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45

Why do most Christians eat pork? Initially, the prohibition against pork was part of the Law giving to Moses as Deuteronomy 14:7, 8 states. However, you must not eat the following animals that chew the cud or that have split hooves: the camel, the hare, and the rock badger, because they chew the cud but do not have split hooves. They are unclean for you. 8 ...


25

Dietary rules among Christians vary from sect to sect. The starting point for understanding the Christian views on food regulation is in the book of Acts, chapter 10, when Peter has a vision and is told that he may eat any kind of food, even unclean food that does not meet Jewish regulations, such as pork. This is symbolic: Peter was told that Gentiles who ...


20

There are a number of verses that talk about what you should or can eat and a few of them do concern vegetarian eating. There are a number of Christian sects that even have a "health message," where they prescribe a vegetarian diet. I think the most notable one is Seventh Day Adventists, but note that the diet is a suggestion in their mind, not Biblical law. ...


19

This is part of a larger question about whether/how the Old Testament Law still applies to Christians of today. What does it mean that Jesus fulfilled the law but did not abolish it? When Christ came, he "fulfilled the Law". Referring specifically to food, Paul the Apostle explained to early Christians that it was their choice whether or not to eat ...


16

God's Endorsement of Eating Meat Actually, God specifically ordained that man could eat meat, starting after the flood. The only prohibition in this was to drain the blood: Every moving thing that lives shall be food for you. And as I gave you the green plants, I give you everything. But you shall not eat flesh with its life, that is, its blood. ...


15

Protestantism and Tradition I'm coming at this answer from a Protestant perspective. Since I've seen a variety of folk in my branch of Christianity hold hands during prayer, I'll assume you've been observing my people. We've inherited from Paul a suspicion of traditional rites and practices. When we do observe some custom, we are very likely to either: ...


13

The answer which focuses on Acts 10 is excellent, but this statement from the Jerusalem Council, also recorded in the book of Acts, is also pertinent: It is my judgment, therefore, that we should not make it difficult for the Gentiles who are turning to God. Instead we should write to them, telling them to abstain from food polluted by idols, from sexual ...


13

There are two primary, though related reasons for why Daniel would not eat the king's food and drink. Daniel was an Israelite (Dan 1:3) of the tribe of Judah (Dan 1:6). He would be bound by the dietary laws regarding clean and unclean foods (see commands for example at Lev 11:46-47). As well, there was preparation and cooking instructions to be followed. ...


11

"Meat" in this sense means, and has historically meant, what used to be called "flesh meat", which St. Thomas Aquinas described as "the flesh of animals that take their rest on the earth" [including birds, who rest in trees on the earth] (Summa Theologica, Second Part of the Second Part, Question 147, Article 8). Exceptions to the rule of "no meat on ...


10

Why do most Christians eat pork, in light of Deuteronomy 14:8? Is this a contradiction? Looking at Christianity from the outside, one could see that the eating of pork is a contradiction, but in reality it is not. First of all, the prohibition of abstaining from the flesh of pigs is not part of the Decalogue. The Ancient People of Israel, the Jews, were and ...


9

Well, the word "manna" itself means "What is it?" so I'm not sure you're going to find a perfectly satisfactory answer to your question. :-) In addition, it was created supernaturally by God, and He didn't share the recipe. :-) Since it was a single miracle, and not something that people still eat today, no one really knows personally what it tastes like. ...


9

Since you did not state which denomination you'd like to find out from, I will provide you an answer from a purely sola scriptura point of view. All verse emphasis mine. Taken wholly, the NKJV Bible does not contain the word vegetarian. However, there are a ton of verses about eating, the virtue of eating, what to eat and what not to eat. Let me give you ...


8

There are two really clear indications about eating meat in the bible: 7 And I heard a voice saying unto me, Arise, Peter; slay and eat.   8 But I said, Not so, Lord: for nothing common or unclean hath at any time entered into my mouth.  9 But the voice answered me again from heaven, What God hath cleansed, that call not thou common.   10 And this ...


8

It seems that the Catholic tradition of eating lamb at Easter was first documented in the 7th century: “The oldest prayer for the blessing of lambs can be found in the seventh-century sacramentary (ritual book) of the Benedictine monastery, Bobbio in Italy. Two hundred years later Rome had adopted it, and thereafter the main feature of the Pope's Easter ...


7

As broad as it may appear, here is how we can summarize it. Matthew 22:35-40 (NIV) One of them, an expert in the law, tested him with this question: “Teacher, which is the greatest commandment in the Law?” Jesus replied: “‘Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind.’ This is the first and ...


7

The "good work" that one can do by eating fish on Fridays is penance. Perhaps it's hard to understand if you love fish and abhor meat, but that's not the case for most people. The following lines contain an excerpt of Keeping Friday, from the Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops: Jesus invited to carry the Cross and do penance for the good of the Church ...


7

I find no reference to Leviticus 11:6 on the websites of the Vatican or the U.S. Council of Catholic Bishops (USCCB). The USCCB does maintain on its website the text of the New American Bible (Revised Edition), or NABRE, which is the only translation approved for public liturgical use in the United States. The NABRE translates Leviticus 11:4–6: 4 ...


7

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints teaches that our bodies are temples where the Holy Ghost can dwell (1 Corinthians 6:19–20) and that they were given to us as a gift from God, therefore we are expected to take care of them. The Word of Wisdom was originally given in 1833 as a word of counsel and is found in Doctrine and Covenants 89. Later ...


7

We Seventh Day Adventists distinguish between three different kinds of laws in the Bible: Moral laws. Ceremonial laws. We also believe that there were laws in the OT specific to Israel as a nation. Something like their "civil code". (Strictly speaking, there are also a few descriptions of other nations' laws in some books, like Persian laws in Daniel, or ...


7

Christianity is broad in its beliefs of what may be eaten and what may not be eaten (see Acts 15, 1Co 8, and Gal 2:11-14 for a peek at early church debates on what foods may or may not be eaten). Many Christians will point to Mark 7:19 or Acts 10:1-11:18 to indicate that God has declared all foods clean. Others recognize that Jesus did not abolish the law (...


7

Daniel 1:3-5 explains how some of the young men from Judah’s royal family and the nobility were taken captive and were to be trained for three years then they would enter into the service of King Nebuchadnezzar. They were assigned a daily amount of food and wine from the king’s table. The reason why Daniel refused to eat this food and drink this wine is ...


7

What kinds of liquids can Catholics have while fasting? First of all let us look at the rules for fasting and abstinence in the Roman Catholic Church. Here is what Pope St. Paul VI has to say in his Apostolic Constitution Paenitemini. The Code of Canon Law (1983) in the Latin Rite reflects this completely. II. 1. The time of Lent preserves its penitential ...


7

Because most Christians are Gentiles (non-Jews). A lot of people want to make the Mosaic Law an all-or-nothing proposition. That was the view of some of the early Jewish Christians, who demanded that Christians all become Jews first. This group is more commonly known as Judaizers Judaizers are Christians who teach it is necessary to adopt Jewish customs and ...


6

Presumably there is purpose to food other than just maintaining life. Revelation describes the New Jerusalem, which is generally equated with Heaven, the place where the saved will spend eternity. And according to Revelation 22:2, in this city, "In the middle of its street, and on either side of the river, was the tree of life, which bore twelve fruits, ...


6

The Catechism of the Catholic Church has useful information on how we should treat the animals. [2416] Animals are God's creatures. He surrounds them with his providential care. By their mere existence they bless him and give him glory. Thus men owe them kindness. We should recall the gentleness with which saints like St. Francis of Assisi or St. ...


6

There might be some confusion here, because killing animals in the church would probably not be done by most Christians. If, however, you mean "why to Christians kill and eat animals, in general?" then I can answer that. Christianity inherited its beliefs about food and animals from Judaism. Animals are perceived differently to Christians. They are not ...


5

There seem to be two different questions addressed by the New Testament relevant to this issue: Does eating certain foods defile a man? Should certain people abstain from certain foods? I don’t think the New Testament teachings contradict. Jesus’ teaching in Mark 7 declares that the first question is answered ‘no’: there is nothing inherent in certain ...


5

The actual question is : Are there any specific rules at all in any denomination of Christianity? I am Roman Catholic and can answer for my denomination. Rules about prayer, meditation, and devotion ... The laity are expected to attend Mass each Sunday and on other specified Holy Days of Obligation, and to faithfully pray and meditate the various ...


5

Perhaps it is because of this confusion that you describe that your title and body do not really seem to match. I will try to clear up this confusion and answer your underlying question. The question seems to be: "Why are Christians not more concerned with ritual and seem so divided on what they should do as Christians? Why are they so different from ...


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