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11

It is indeed about the Pharisees. Here's what Shmuel Safrai's paper “Religion in Everyday Life" says: Mondays and Thursdays, which were synagogue days, when country-folk came to town and the courts sat and the Torah was read, were the favoured days for public and private fasts. People would assemble for prayer, mention the reason for the fast, as follows ...


8

Background The wild dates assigned to the Didache are most likely a result of the the several developments it seems to have gone under. Some scholars have even attempted to remove the "additions" to the original Didache in order to uncover the original text1. It is difficult to determine just how late the last development occurred, so for this reason, I ...


7

Lee McDonald says in The Biblical Canon that the most common criteria in identifying what was and wasn't canonical for the early church was apostolicity, orthodoxy, antiquity, and use, and adaptability and inspiration were also used to a lesser extent. David King, a UMC pastor, utilized McDonald's categories in a 2012 paper on the pericanonicity of the ...


6

Since the Didache was discovered in the late 19th century, scholars have provided a number of rationales, ranging from the typical standards of canonicity (late age, mysterious authorship, poor quality) to its association with an early heresy. Age The simplest explanation that many scholars have provided, either directly or indirectly, is that the work was ...


6

Why do I need to explain the reason Jesus Christ is not mentioned or noted as God in the "Roman Creed" and the Didache? ONE is arguing from silence any time you point to specific data that is not present. In this case, Jesus is not mentioned as God in these two documents. A rational inquiry would seek to understand the data (the words) that ARE ...


5

Arguments from Silence This is an articulate example of employing the argument from silence. Arguments from silence always rely on an unstated premise (think about it, it's actually pretty funny). This does not mean the conclusion of an argument from silence is always false. It means the argument is not logically valid. For example: P1: They didn't say it C: ...


4

The Encyclopedia of Ancient Christianity on this topic points us to The Shepherd of Hermas. This work is dated to about the same time as the Didache (last first or early second century) and bears some similarities with it, and describes more specifically how a Christian is to fast: First of all, be on your guard against every evil word, and every evil ...


4

The Wikipedia article on the Didache states (under the heading 'Fasting'), the following : Chapter 8 suggests that fasts are not to be on Monday and Thursday "with the hypocrites" — presumably non-Christian Jews, such as the Pharisees — but on Wednesday and Friday. Fasting Wednesday and Friday plus worshiping on Sunday constituted the Christian week. Nor ...


3

Dr. J. Carl Gregg stated: In the first century knowledge was decidedly more local. For example, scholars tell us that the Gospel of Luke can claim with presumed honesty to have “gathered [all available] primary sources as background research for writing his Gospel, but “these sources apparently did not include even a single copy of any of Paul’s letters, ...


2

Regardless of the dating of the Didache, its formula for baptism is this. baptize into the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit,2443 in living water. Didache Chapter 7 That, of course, is a Trinitarian formula found also in Matthew. Go ye therefore, and teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and ...


1

"Didst create all things for thy Name's sake" This is a phrase which means "for thy glory" Psalm 23 (DRB) A psalm for David. The Lord ruleth me: and I shall want nothing. 2 He hath set me in a place of pasture. He hath brought me up, on the water of refreshment: 3 he hath converted my soul. He hath led me on the paths of justice, for his own name'...


1

I'm not sure how directly relevant this is, but in 1 Chronicles 29:10-11 are found the phrases "our father", "for ever and ever", "the power and the glory", and "thine is the kingdom". Matthew must surely be telling us that our Lord Jesus took these phrases from David's prayer to make the Lord's Prayer. At least, that ...


1

The earliest known Scriptural manuscript in which it appears is the Codex Washingtonianus (third-oldest Bible), dated to the late 4th/early 5th century. Interestingly enough Jerome would have been working on the Vulgate at a similar time to this; the Vulgate does not contain the doxology. The King James Bible and a small selection of other translations use ...


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