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17

There is much debate about this one but I think the Rabbis never understood it, which causes trouble to some Christian commentators as well. It reminds me of this: For it is written in the Law of Moses:“Do not muzzle an ox while it is treading out the grain.” Is it about oxen that God is concerned? (1 Corinthians 9:9, NIV) The Apostle applies this to ...


11

Sacred groves are a common feature of ancient pagan religion. A particularly accessible Western example might be Oedipus at Colonus, which is the middle play in the Theban cycle of Sophocles (following Oedipus Rex and preceding Antigone). A great deal of the action in Oedipus at Colonus takes place in a grove outside Colonus that is consecrated to the "...


10

While not discounting the fact that Jesus in fact fulfills the office of prophet, it is not the only interpretation. Indeed, a common rule of hermeneutics is that a verse cannot mean what the original audience could not have understood it to mean. As the concept of Messiah is exilic and the Deuteronomical law is considered at latest to have been 800BC or so,...


10

For mainstream Christian denominations (including Roman Catholics, Eastern Orthodox, mainline Protestants, and Evangelicals), Resurrection is NOT the key to Jesus's identity. Rather, the resurrection shows the VICTORY of Jesus over the power of death due to His obedience to God the Father. If you read the four Gospels, the speeches in the book of Acts, and ...


9

Because Emmanuel/Immanuel is a nick name. It is like saying Clark Kent, his name is SuperMan, though people also know him as Man of Steel. Which is the same with Jesus, he's name is Jesus of Nazareth, we call him Jesus Christ (Christ means Messiah) but we know him as Emmanuel because he's God in the flesh who walked with us. and the prophecy is Isaiah 7:...


8

As someone else stated in an answer to a similar question of yours, "The Catholic Church does stand behind the verse, but insists that it be read in context, and in the context of the literary genre of the passage." In fact, that would be the answer to any question about whether the Catholic Church "stands behind" a particular verse. There's a similar law ...


7

Opinions abound. One is that the practice was cruel and inhumane, but given the animal sacrifices for sin, that just doesn't make sense to me. Another is that the Jews were lactose intolerant, but if that were true, only common sense would be required, not a law. Perhaps the practice did not fully or properly cook the meat, so the prohibition was actually ...


7

Its hard to understand why you should think for a minute that Jesus taught anyone to follow any other god than the God of the Jewish Tanakh (ie the Old Testament). If you can add to your question to show how Jesus's teaching differs from the Tanakh then that would be helpful. As far as the Christian is concerned nothing Jesus taught contradicts the Tanakh, ...


6

In their publication Reasoning from the Scriptures they address this question. They don't claim to be inspired prophets but faithful students of the scriptures who in their constant efforts to keep on the watch have made errors in regard to their expectations on end times bible prophecy. Below is the pertinent quote from that book: Have not Jehovah’s ...


6

It's a fundamental belief of Christianity that the coming of Jesus fulfils the Old Testament law. In other words that the Law was only ever intended to be until the coming of Messiah. Jesus did not therefore abolish or diminish the law. His coming simply marked the end of its original intended purpose. Jesus says as much in Matthew chapter 5 verse 17. “Do ...


5

The historical answer for this, as it applies to Gentiles, was recorded on the book of Acts. Mosaic Law was given to the nation of Israel (the Jews), not the Church. Early on in Church history, the question of whether adherence to Mosaic Law was to be applied to Gentile believers. Acts 15 New International Version (NIV) The Council at Jerusalem ...


5

Naomi fled from the famine in Judah to live in Moab with her husband and two sons. Her two sons eventually married Moabite wives including Ruth. Naomi’s husband and sons eventually died and she decided to return to her homeland. Ruth clung onto her with a pledge that ‘your people will be my people and your God will be my God.’ (Ruth 1:16). Though she was a ...


4

Yes. The original word Asherah referred to shrines to a fertility goddess, not to forests, groves, or trees in general. There's nothing wrong with having trees around, of course; this is just another example of God's repeated warnings against idolatry. Asherah was the consort of Baal, whose worshipers were always a thorn in the side of Israel, and the two ...


4

The Law of Moses was part of the Mosaic Covenant. This covenant was between God and Israel, but we should not assume that it would never end. In fact, God spoke to the Jewish people of a new covenant that He would establish. “Behold, days are coming,” declares the Lord, “when I will make a new covenant with the house of Israel and with the house of ...


4

The Catholic Church considers the Bible to be the inspired word of God: God is the author of Sacred Scripture. "The divinely revealed realities, which are contained and presented in the text of Sacred Scripture, have been written down under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit." (Catechism of the Catholic Church, paragraph 105; the quote is taken from the ...


3

Jesus answered, “I am the way and the truth and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me. (John 14:6, NIV) Know that a person is not justified by the works of the law, but by faith in Jesus Christ. So we, too, have put our faith in Christ Jesus that we may be justified by faith in Christ and not by the works of the law, because by ...


3

Numbers 20:25–29 says (NABRE) Take Aaron and Eleazar his son and bring them up on Mount Hor. Then strip Aaron of his garments and put them on Eleazar, his son; but there Aaron shall be gathered up in death. Moses did as the LORD commanded. When they had climbed Mount Hor in view of the whole community, Moses stripped Aaron of his garments and put ...


3

Moses is saying that the covenant must be kept intact - today we'd say that if they change the terms of the contract they break the contract! Gentile Christians however were never part of the Old Mosaic covenant, and so they are not bound by it. To use the analogy of an employment contract, imagine there are two workers at a company. One has a contract, and ...


3

Boiling a young goat in the very thing that is intended to bring life to the goat would be abhorrent. A goat in the Old Testament was killed for one of two reasons, for food or for atonement for sins. In both instances, the goat is giving up it's life for the good of the people. Not only has the goat's life been taken, but now we're taking something that ...


3

Footnote from the NLT: As in Dead Sea Scrolls, which read "the number of the sons of God", and Greek version, which reads "the number of the angels of God"; Masoretic Text reads "the number of the sons of Israel".


3

The word, "'elohiym" in Hebrew can properly be seen as meaning, "God", "gods", "divine beings". So, you might say that the meaning was that he was keeping house of Jacob apart from the rest of the world and marking it as, "his" in the chosen sense of the word. This reinforces the idea that being "holy", in Hebrew, really means being separate, set apart (see ...


3

Various creeds and confessions can be utilized in answering a question like this one. A general view has been that Jesus is denouncing or correcting actions that were abusing oaths and the inherent trust meant to be attached to them. We should also take note of James's teaching in James 5:12 (ESV): But above all, my brothers, do not swear, either by ...


2

I'm curious which translation you're using? This should probably be a comment rather than an answer, but I wanted to include some common translations for comparison. It looks like it's more commonly translated as "sons/children of God/Israel" Deuteronomy 32:8-9 (YLT) 8  In the Most High causing nations to inherit, In His separating sons of Adam --...


2

De 18:15–19. CHRIST THE PROPHET IS TO BE HEARD. The Lord thy God will raise up unto thee a prophet—The insertion of this promise, in connection with the preceding prohibition, might warrant the application (which some make of it) to that order of true prophets whom God commissioned in unbroken succession to instruct, to direct, and warn His people; and in ...


2

Depending on the translation, it could be rendered "in the side" or "by the side" or "beside". The tablets given to Moses were kept inside the Ark, as was the rod that budded, and manna (Heb 9:4).


2

Immanuel means "god with us." Christ means "messiah" which we know means savior. As Christians we believe that Jesus is the only person who walked and never sinned. God descending to Earth in human flesh.(while the father still exists in heaven also. Father, son, Holy Spirit) And the Word became flesh, and dwelt among us, and we saw His glory, glory as ...


2

The Law, given to Moses on Mt. Sinai, was God's second work intended to make A People for Himself. The first work we know as God's creating man in His image, according to His likeness, in which thus the Word of God was in his heart as it was certainly of God's own heart. For Moses writes in Deuteronomy 30:14, But the word is very near you, in your mouth, ...


2

Paul the Apostle was a Jew who converted to the Christian faith, and he taught strongly in his epistles that following the law will get the Jew nowhere. He worked tirelessly to convert the Jew to Christ and deliver them from the law, going from synagogue to synagogue in Acts. He wanted them to forsake Moses (Acts 21:21). He himself as a Jews put aside the ...


2

If I'm understanding you, you are wondering about how some laws in the Old Testament differ, since Jesus seems to upend some, yet uphold others. And you also asked about how to know if they are binding. This answer hopefully will provide clarity to those points. In the New Testament a distinction is made between commandments and the statutes (letter) of the ...


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