28

In Amos 8, the prophet declares (NIV trans.): 11 “The days are coming,” declares the Sovereign Lord, “when I will send a famine through the land— not a famine of food or a thirst for water, but a famine of hearing the words of the Lord. 12 People will stagger from sea to sea and wander from north to east, searching for the word of the Lord, but ...


18

When Jesus said that the scribes and Pharisees would be charged for the murder of all the prophets, that is, from Abel to Zechariah, he indicated what he considered to be the Hebrew canon. He was speaking according to the traditional Jewish canon, in which Chronicles is listed as the last book and in which Zechariah is killed at 2 Chronicles 24:20, 21. Luke ...


9

Revelation 22:19 (NIV) And if anyone takes words away from this scroll of prophecy, God will take away from that person any share in the tree of life and in the Holy City, which are described in this scroll. "THIS SCROLL" Literally, "this scroll" refers to the scroll which Apostle John was writing. John was a prisoner in Patmos Island and on the ...


8

The Protestant view has been taken from the Jews. It was the Jews who did not recognise the apocryphal writings as inspired. A personal view is that the 62 weeks in Daniel 9:25 is 434 years of prophetic silence from the end of the OT (with the completion of Nehemiah) in 408 BC, to the start of the ministry of John the Baptist. This is based on a crucifixion ...


7

It is true that the Jews ultimately did not accept the apocryphal books you listed in their canon, in a gradual process over several centuries at least spanning 1st century BC and 1st century AD. There was no definitive answer, but a lot of pointers showing the development, shown in the BIBLE CANON article of the 1906 Jewish Encyclopedia. Especially after ...


6

The Deuterocanon quoted (or referred to) in the New Testament Other answers give lists, but here's a quick one with the cross-references in the Protestant King James Bible (1611). Matthew 6:14-15 and Sirach 7:14 Matthew 27:43 and Wisdom 2:15,16 Luke 6:31 and Tobit 4:15 Luke 14:13 and Tobit 4:7 John 10:22 and 1 Maccabees 4:59 Romans and Wisdom, clay and the ...


6

The 39 articles of religion in the back of the Book of Common Prayer, used by Anglicans and Episcopalians, says concerning these books (part of Article 6): And the other Books (as Hierome saith) the Church doth read for example of life and instruction of manners; but yet doth it not apply them to establish any doctrine; such are these following: It then ...


6

There are two considerations. One is to establish the fact of roughly 400 years of silence based on writings of that time area. In other words, this is in fact how those of that time understood that there was silence. Two is to then establish if this is shown in Scripture and specifically the Old Testament. In other words, since we know they believed ...


5

The question has several underlying premises. The Catholic Church considers the Book of Wisdom to be canonical, i.e. it belongs to the Scripture. For Catholicism, infallibility of Scripture means "every part of Scripture is literally true". In Wisdom 9:8 (or else) the author claims to be Solomon. Premise 1 is of course true. Yet, notice that ...


5

What's missing in the above answers I think is perhaps a couple of concepts that we Orthodox take for granted, but may not be readily apparent to Westerners. First is the attitude towards Canon Law. In the West a law is a minimum, absolute standard. For example, if the speed limit is 55 and you drive 56, you're breaking the law. For the Orthodox the Canons ...


5

The 85th Apostolic Canon, ratified at the Quinisext Council in Trullo in 692, enumerated the list of Old Testament books: Let the following books be counted venerable and sacred by all of you, both clergy and Laity. Of the Old Testament, five books of Moses, Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy; of Joshua the Son of Nun, one; of the ...


5

Undoubtedly we can say that Jesus' divine nature is omniscient, but your confusion could result from identifying Wisdom too closely with Jesus. In Luke 11:31-35, Jesus speaks of John the Baptist, himself and then Wisdom, but only in the third person and such terms that it would be difficult for us to think of her as his divine nature: Luke 11:31-35: "Then ...


5

Matt. 6:19-20 - Jesus' statement about laying up for yourselves treasure in heaven follows Sirach 29:11 - lay up your treasure. Matt.. 7:12 - Jesus' golden rule "do unto others" is the converse of Tobit 4:15 - what you hate, do not do to others. Matt. 7:16,20 - Jesus' statement "you will know them by their fruits" follows Sirach 27:6 - the fruit discloses ...


5

The Protestants rejection of the deuterocanonical books being equal to Holy Scripture is based primarily on Jerome's Helmeted Preface: Jerome, in his Prologue to the Books of the Kings This preface to the Scriptures may serve as a helmeted [i.e. defensive] introduction to all the books which we turn from Hebrew into Latin, so that we may be assured ...


4

Source: Royalty Jr., R. M. (2004). Don't Touch This Book!: Revelation 22:18-19 And the Rhetoric of Reading (in) The Apocalypse of John. Biblical Interpretation, 12(3), 282-299. Someone has done a thesis on this topic. The author's thesis is that: ...how Revelation reads from the scriptures and how it attempts to con(trol) its audience functions as part ...


4

tl;dr: There is no record of the Council of Nicaea defining the Canon of Scripture. It is not clear what Jerome meant. The Catholic Encyclopedia's entry for the Book of Judith summarizes what we know, stating St. Jerome, while rejecting in theory those books which he did not find in his Hebrew manuscript, yet consented to translate Judith because "the ...


4

Because Protestants do not believe that the Holy Spirit and Jesus Christ have borne witness to them that those texts are inspired scripture. The Westminster Confession (1646) has a fascinating paragraph where it lists off many of the characteristics that set scripture apart from other writings, before dismissing them all to say that the ultimate reason we ...


3

I don't think there are any denominations outside of Catholicism accept deuterocanonical books. This is because of the testimony of Jewish Priest Josephus. Jewish historian Josephus wrote about the canon used in the first century Israel. Against Apion, Book 1, Paragraph 8. For we have not an innumerable multitude of books among us, disagreeing from and ...


3

Nobody knows who the original author of the Book of Jasher was, although it is mentioned in Joshua 10:12-13 and in 2 Samuel 1:18-27. Neither has the original manuscript survived. What we do know is that it was also known as the “Book of the Upright One” in the Greek Septuagint and the “Book of the Just Ones” in the Latin Vulgate. The Book of Jasher was ...


3

Here is the list of Catholic Deuterocanonical books. For each book, I researched the most accepted dating by scholars, consulting mostly the Dictionary of New Testament Background, IVP Press, 2000 edited by Craig A. Evans and Stanley E. Porter, Jr. (indicated by DNTB) and Wikipedia. Tobit: Story is set in 8th century BC, currently accepted dating is 225-...


3

How much of the deuterocanonical books are true? All deuterocanonical books are considered inspired biblical texts by the Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox Church, the Oriental Orthodox Churches and the Assyrian Church of the East to be canonical books of the Old Testament but which are considered non-canonical by Protestant denominations and thus ...


2

The major problem with this question is the fact that the idea of "canon" is anachronistic to the first century. Even within the Christian tradition the "final" form of the canon didn't exist until the 4th century (see Athanasius' Festal Letter). Within Judaism, it was commonly held that the "canonization" of the Hebrew Bible took place at Jamnia (Javneh) in ...


2

Dead Sea Scrolls haven't changed the Protestant Canon. This is because Jewish Priest Josephus clearly explains about the Old Testament Canon used in first century AD. Against Apion, Book 1, Paragraph 8. "For we have not an innumerable multitude of books among us, disagreeing from and contradicting one another, [as the Greeks have,] but only twenty-two ...


2

The Deuterocanon, both Catholic and Orthodox, was written before the time of John's revelation, so that verse clearly does not condemn them; generally, the phrase "the book of this prophecy" seems to refer solely to the Revelation and not to any of the other writings later combined with it (some more dynamic translations have a variant of "this book of ...


2

Biblical Apocrypha was not part of Old Testament Canon used by Jews in First century Israel. Let me give evidence from Jewish Priest Josephus. Jewish Priest Josephus clearly explains about the Old Testament Canon used in first century AD. Against Apion, Book 1, Paragraph 8. "For we have not an innumerable multitude of books among us, disagreeing from and ...


2

One interpretation; many applications. That is a good mantra for all students of biblical interpretation, I believe. It applies not only to verses of relevance to the practical, day-to-day issues and the steps we need to take to get our beliefs to agree with our behaviors, our attitudes to jibe with our actions, but it also applies to certain prophetic ...


2

The records from the Nicene Council that survived to the modern day make no mention of setting a canon. Jerome's preface to Judith, less than 100 years after the council, says that the Nicene Council included Judith (one of the Deuterocanon) among the Sacred Scriptures. Jerome's Preface to Judith Among the Hebrews the Book of Judith is found among ...


2

First of all, there are several Bibles in Arabic available online at www.archive.org. As I do not know Arabic, you might need to check whether they include the Deuterocanonical books or not. According to Wikipedia, there has been three versions of the bible in Arabic done by Catholics. The first one, in 1671, published in Rome. I doubt this is sold online ...


2

Pseudonymity wasn't considered deceptive in that day. Daniel, 2nd Peter and Jude are also considered pseudonymous works. http://www.oxfordbiblicalstudies.com/article/opr/t94/e1551 Even though scripture is inspired by the Holy Spirit, it is still delivered by by human agents and as such reflects the customs of the time. There is some evidence that ...


2

This period of 'silence' may correspond to the seventy weeks prophecy of Daniel. There is a hint in the seventy weeks vision to a coming absence of visions and prophecy: Seventy weeks are decreed for your people and your holy city: to finish the transgression, to put an end to sin, and to atone for iniquity, to bring in everlasting righteousness, to seal ...


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