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In 1843, a British tract published 1917 as a possible date for the end of the Gentile Times. In 1844, a British clergyman, E. B. Elliott, drew attention to 1914 as a possible date for the end of the “seven times” of Daniel chapter 4. In 1849, Robert Seeley, of London, dealt with the subject in like manner. Joseph Seiss, of the United States, pointed to 1914 ...


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The prophecy of the great image in Dan 2:31-35 is one of the few Bible prophecies about which there is broad agreement, largely because it is explicitly interpreted in Dan 2:37-45. In outline, there are five kingdoms depicted: The head of gold is Babylon, Dan 2:37, 38. This is agreed by Ellicott, Barnes, Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Bible Commentary, Gill, ...


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OP: Which of the above is the official decree that fulfills the explanation of the prophecy by the angel Gabriel in Daniel 9:25? The first decree given to build the Temple by Cyrus in 539 B.C and overseen by Zerubbabel (Cryus lived 600-530 B.C) the second decree given by Darius the Great 522-486 B.C (what year was this decree given... 521 B.C?) The ...


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@Dottard answered the first part of the question, the widespread agreement on the identification of the kingdoms with the parts of the statue. I will tackle the second part: a partial refutation of postdiction. Antiquity. I do not believe that there is sufficient archeological evidence to prove that Daniel was written before the Medo-Persian and Greek ...


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Up until about the time of John Darby circa 1850, Christians believed the 70 weeks of Daniel had been fully completed. There was no "gap" theory. Introductioin In looking for an answer, it often helps to review what others who came before the current time thought about the 70 weeks or 490 years of Daniel 9:24-27. This is not to say whether or not ...


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It is often claimed that there is no evidence of Darius the Mede outside the Bible in the book of Daniel. Those who claim this tend to accept the testimony of Josephus, writing in the first century ad, and tend to dismiss the testimony of earlier writers. It is obviously true that the currently available evidence is sketchy; had there been no destruction of ...


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