15

It's from The Screwtape Letters, letter XVIII. The truth is that wherever a man lies with a woman, there, whether they like it or not, a transcendental relation is set up between them which must be eternally enjoyed or eternally endured. In context, Screwtape is telling Wormwood that the "one flesh" analogy in the Bible refers not to some romantic notion ...


15

C. S. Lewis is well-known for not calling himself a theologian. Rather than seeking a systematic theological perspective, he understood the story of Christ as a "true myth." As he explains: It is true, not in the sense of being a 'description' of God (that no finite mind could take in) but in the sense of being the way in which God chooses to (...


8

tl;dr> NO! For Lewis, Pleasure is temporary, Joy reminds us of what is to come First and foremost, I should admit that if the canon ever gets re-opened, The Great Divorce is my vote for book #67. :) That said, C.S. Lewis has a very definite idea in mind when he says "Infinite Joy". In The Weight of Glory he writes: “It would seem that Our ...


8

If you check out "The Abolition of Man" you'll get an understanding of what he means. He's basically saying that modern education has a tendency to move our eyes from the joy that is set before us in heaven, to the created things of this world. In Lewis' time (think mid-1940's) the "modern education" system which he decries was more or less about a century ...


8

Because some things cannot be accomplished by the application of power. Suppose I asked you to draw a 4-sided triangle. You would presumably reply that this is impossible, because a triangle by definition has only 3 sides. Suppose I then say, Well, what if you had 10 really strong men to help? Then could you do it? Of course the logical reply is that it ...


7

There's a very common teaching on what's called "soul ties". The idea is that there are various things that can tie two human souls together. One of those is sex. The Biblical support for this is 1 Corinthians 6:16 6 Do you not know that he who unites himself with a prostitute is one with her in body? For it is said, “The two will become one flesh.” ...


7

There's this passage on page 76 of Present Concerns: You can't, except in the lowest animal sense, be in love with a girl if you know (and keep on remembering) that all the beauties both of her person and of her character are a momentary and accidental pattern produced by the collision of atoms, and that your own response to them is only a sort of psychic ...


7

This brief addendum is intended only to corroborate OP's considered conclusion that Lewis does not see any need to settle on a particular theory of the atonement, considering it to be something beyond human understanding. In a letter written to a "Mr. Young" (otherwise unidentified) dated 31 October 1963 -- so less than a month before he died -- Lewis is ...


7

The most obvious reference I see comes from St. Catherine of Siena, one of the Doctors of the Catholic Church. St. Catherine wrote a work known as the Dialogue, representing a discussion between a soul and God. In Section 22 of the Dialogue, God says this to the soul: "[The] vision of the Devil is the third pain [of four pains suffered by those in Hell]...


7

Perhaps reading the context of the quote will help make more sense of it. It is from The Abolition of Man: No emotion is, in itself, a judgement; in that sense all emotions and sentiments are alogical. But they can be reasonable or unreasonable as they conform to Reason or fail to conform. The heart never takes the place of the head; but it can, and ...


6

This answer is my personal opinion, no more, but it is the personal opinion of an aging man who has read almost every word Lewis ever wrote, most more than once. When Lewis returned to the faith, he was doing what many do, looking for a spiritual home that was also a social orthodoxy. This can be seen if you read his memoirs, Surprised by Joy. Shortly ...


6

Here is a more full context: May we not, by a reasonable analogy, suppose likewise that there is no experience of the spirit so transcendent and supernatural, no vision of Deity Himself so close and so far beyond all images and emotions, that to it also there cannot be an appropriate correspondence on the sensory level? Not by a new sense but by ...


6

I am not sure, but it may be a reference to Hebrews 11: 13 All these people were still living by faith when they died. They did not receive the things promised; they only saw them and welcomed them from a distance, admitting that they were foreigners and strangers on earth. 14 People who say such things show that they are looking for a country of ...


5

The quote is from C.S.Lewis in "Mere christianity", book 4, chapter 3 "Time And Beyond Time".


5

Indeed, in chapter 6 ("Human Pain") of The Problem of Pain, Lewis explicitly connects the idea to Aristotle: Kant thought that no action had moral value unless it were done out of pure reverence for the moral law, that is, without inclination, and he has been accused of a 'morbid frame of mind' which measures the value of an act by its ...


5

I also found it in Mere Christianity under "7. Let's Pretend": Why? What is the good of pretending to be what you are not? Well, even on the human level, you know, there are two kinds of pretending. There is a bad kind, where the pretence is there instead of the real thing; as when a man pretends he is going to help you instead of really helping ...


5

G.K. Chesterton in his seminal work Orthodoxy: Those countries in Europe which are still influenced by priests, are exactly the countries where there is still singing and dancing and coloured dresses and art in the open-air. Catholic doctrine and discipline may be walls; but they are the walls of a playground. Christianity is the only frame which has ...


5

The first one is from a sermon called The Father's Appeal, preached in Westminster Chapel: “Though Jesus Christ is very hard to satisfy, He is very easy to please. Think of that and it will help you a little. He is very easy to please, but very hard to satisfy. If you will but let Him in, and you have not much to put on the table. You cannot share much of ...


4

Arminians and other varieties of non-Calvinists reconcile the all-powerful nature of God with His allowance of free will to men, within the limits of physics he has given them, as God constrains Himself to His own purpose and character. In so keeping, it is God's character and not His power that is the 'limiting factor' in why, though it is His desire that ...


4

I think your friend either misunderstands you or Lewis. You will find a nice essay by David Allred, comparing C.S. Lewis and Plato, at "Into the Wardrobe". Things in themselves It is perfectly Christian to reflect that all things in themselves are good. Indeed, Paul asserted the idea just as clearly: "I am convinced, being fully persuaded in the Lord Jesus,...


4

A quick Google search produced this: Now the story of Christ is simply a true myth: a myth working on us the same way as the others, but with this tremendous difference that it really happened: and one must be content to accept it in the same way, remembering that it is God’s myth where the others are men’s myths: i.e., the Pagan stories are God ...


4

From my notes on chapter 2 of Miracles: Miracle: “An interference with nature by supernatural power.” Naturalists: “Those who believe that nothing exists except nature.” Supernaturalists: “Those who believe that, besides nature, there exists something else.” Nature: Defined by naturalists as “everything there is.” More rigorously, the natural is “what ...


4

Section One deals with Lewis’s initial reaction to the death of his wife. He asks this about God: Why is He so present a commander in our time of prosperity and so very absent a help in time of trouble? I tried to put some of these thoughts to C. this afternoon. He reminded me that the same thing seems to have happened to Christ: “Why hast thou ...


3

Significant events that occurred roughly 100yrs before he wrote this quote: On the Origin of Species was published on 24 November 1859. Not only did this work by Darwin directly influenced State Atheism, it also drastically changed how scientists and schools perceived the world. The transition from the Industrial Revolution ended in about 1830-40. ...


3

But in general, we like him, so why didn't he like us? In addition to the quotes from the obvious books to consult C. S. Lewis and the Catholic Church and C.S. Lewis and the Church of Rome, an National Catholic Register article in 2017 titled Why C.S. Lewis Never Became a Catholic cited several more references and interviews with Peter Kreeft, George Sayer (...


3

I've read several of Lewis's works (Narnia series, Great Divorce, Mere Christianity, pieces of a few others), and I'm not aware of any of his writings that suggest what that author describes. Certainly, Lewis had some very interesting views about what life will be like after we die (or after the return of Christ). In The Last Battle, "heaven" is depicted ...


3

Lewis is pointing out that if the object of hope can never be attained as a better state (i.e., it is better to seek with anticipation than to find), then true hope is impossible (with the exclusion of false perception, i.e., "and known to be true"). One cannot hope for a worse state. One could say that in the glorified state hope is no longer significant. "...


3

A man focused on loving others instead of himself will see the many rules shrink to but one. As Romans 13 says: 8 Let no debt remain outstanding, except the continuing debt to love one another, for whoever loves others has fulfilled the law. 9 The commandments, “You shall not commit adultery,” “You shall not murder,” “You shall not steal,” “You ...


3

A search on quite a few of Lewis' works did not yield anything with the phrase "chemical reaction" in it. Additionally, searches for "love" and "chemical" revealed nothing as well. However, Lewis is quoted this, which is along the same vein: We can be certain that, in this life at any rate, thought is intimately connected to the brain. The theory that ...


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