We’re rewarding the question askers & reputations are being recalculated! Read more.
37

Luther originally condemned the Church being involved in military conquests and advocated non-violence against Muslims Martin Luther first wrote about the Crusades, and general armed conflict against Muslims (whom he often refers to as "Turks" given that the Ottoman Empire was the primary military force of the day), in his Explanation of the 95 Theses in ...


7

Well, only the Catholic and Orthodox churches existed during the times of the crusade. So, most major Protestant groups tend to wash their hands of the whole matter since they didn't exist at the time. The Catholic church specifically, has apologized for the Crusades (back in 2000) and seems to carry a sense of shame about the whole event. The event ...


6

The era of the Crusades certainly coincides with a dramatic increase in the authority of the Pope, both in practical terms and in the development of doctrine. It is a bit hard to untangle how much of this is due to the Crusades themselves. First, a word of warning! It is very easy to slip into anachronistic habits when thinking about the medieval papacy. It ...


6

It is true that in the Ten Commandments we read that it is not permitted to kill. But we do have a duty to protect ourselves and our neighbors in times of war or persecution. The helpless needed to be defended in Palestine and the Holy Sites liberated from oppression. We must not forget that the Greek Emperor Alexius Comnenus had sent letters to Pope Urban ...


5

It doesn't appear that there was a formal "commissioning" of any sort. Most of the information that follows is actually summarized from articles on Wikipedia (on Louis VII of France, Bernard of Clairvaux, and Pope Eugene III). The story apparently begins in 1144, when Louis VII of France was successfully fighting Theobald II of Champagne. At the very end of ...


5

In the history of indulgences, the "Crusade Indulgence" is known as the first official plenary indulgence. Dan Brown's novel The Da Vinci Code certainly stated several untruths about the teachings of the Catholic Church. It is only true to admit that some Crusaders did in fact commit some horrendous crimes, but indulgences were instituted by the Church to ...


4

(TL;DR): Well, the Catholic Church didn't call a stop to the Crusades. It is the crusaders themselves who gave up after the failure of the siege of Tunis. As user13992 said, Crusades "stopping," we are not talking of an ongoing Crusade being called off, but of a new Crusade not being convoked, but, furthermore, the Catholic Church didn't call to stop the ...


4

Professor Petrus Johannes Blok was Professor of Dutch History at Leiden University, the Netherlands oldest university, in the late 19th and early 20th century. In 1907 he identified that the decree sentencing almost all Netherlands inhabitants to death, and depriving them of their property, said to have been promulgated in Spain in 1568, was actually a ...


3

St. Thomas Aquinas's view on "Whether heretics ought to be tolerated?" St. Thomas Aquinas's Summa Theologica II-II q. 11 a. 3 c., his answer to the question "Whether heretics ought to be tolerated?," shows that although heretics deserve death, the Church must show them mercy, and if they are stubborn, apply disciplinary means like excommunication, only ...


2

They helped to break down feudalism by increasing the authority of kings. Some nobles died in battle without leaving an heir. Their lands passed to the king. Some nobles sold their land in an effort to raise money to pay the special tax levied by the king to offset the cost of the crusades. Some nobles gave their serfs a chance to buy their freedom in an ...


1

This is a highly controversial topic as there are many people that have a high view of Augustine. However, what He introduced in to the Church is nothing less than Gnosticism. The more I read the ante-Nicean (prior to the council) church writings, the more I see our view of scripture is not nearly as literal as there's was. Augustine spent years as a ...


1

No, it would not be considered in any historical sense a crusade. There hadn't been a crusade (i.e. 1-7) for 300 years at that point. Catholic historians consider the fight against the Albigensians and the struggle to reclaim Andalusia "crusades" 1. But this struggle doesn't have the hallmarks of a crusade. Namely, a concerted force of Christian soldiers, ...


1

As happened frequently in Muslim countries, stronger and less tolerant Muslims took over control of the lands and "The whole of Asia Minor up to the Bosporus soon fell under Turkish Muslim Control". So That was really coming right up to the borders of Byzantium. Which, even though there were theological discrepancies, had not yet ceased to be friends with ...


1

I have recently taken few lesson of Gregorian Chant and we sung something from the Ninth Mass to Virgin Mary. Unfortunately, we stopped at Kyrie and I've heard its Sanctus just once or twice, so I can't tell whether some part of it is similar to that Aleinu record or not. I have notes for the Sanctus, so at the first opportunity I can scan the notes and link ...


1

About "doing crazy thing as risking in battle" - do you think Israelites were crazy for risking the Ark of the Covenant in battle? About the history of finding of the Precious and Livegiving Cross - look here for the narration about Saint Helen http://www.goarch.org/special/listen_learn_share/exaltholycross


1

When it comes to Christianity, we know that all the denominations hold one single view in terms of character of Jesus of Nazareth, him being the risen Christ and his teachings of love and many other things. So, irrespective of who is responsible of the crusades, it does leave a "dark mark" in the history of Christianity as a whole, which whether we like it ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible