19

While this is easy enough to answer from a Reformed point of view, I'd like to start by pointing out that the felt need for extra-Biblical statements on matters of faith is not limited to Reformed circles or even Protestantism. In fact they are common to all traditions and sects in Christendom.1 Even your most run-of-the-mill non-denominational half-baked-...


14

The "prophet" Muhammad stated that the angel Gabriel visited him with revelation and he put great importance upon Gabriel. This is not true. Not if you are talking about the Koran, which never says this. This information comes from the Hadiths. If you were to base your understanding of Mohammed purely on his writings (i.e. the Koran) and not on the ...


12

I like this question because it forces us to read the Westminster Confession in its context, and not just as a settled statement of belief. In summary, the two confessions are in continuity, but the earlier Scots Confession was more permissive. Especially, it did not exclude the option of episcopal polity, or of royal power over the Church. The Westminster ...


12

Latter-day Saints reject the doctrines of the Trinity as taught by most Christian churches today. These creeds were canonized in the fourth and fifth centuries A.D. and do not reflect the thinking or beliefs of the New Testament church.1 That said there isn't too much with the Apostles Creed(in bold) that LDS beliefs differ from. I believe in God, the ...


11

Is an English translation of the letter publicly available, and where can I find it? If you are talking about finding it online, you aren't going to have any luck. These letters, as far as I know, are not available to read online. However, if you are willing to spend some money, an English book compilation of the letters by George Mastrantonis can be ...


10

An important note. This topic is surely filled with material that is horribly offensive. In the text below, I am trying to describe various beliefs which I do not personally hold, and to which my denomination (regrettably, only since 1986) no longer subscribes. One Antichrist or many? The cited passage from 1 John does indeed talk about many antichrists; ...


10

I generally write from a reformed perspective, but I don't think there's anything in this post that other Christians (Oriental Orthodox and Church of the East aside) would disagree with. The doctrine was first formulated clearly by the Council of Chalcedon: One and the same Son, the Self-same Perfect in Godhead, the Self-same Perfect in Manhood; truly ...


10

Jehovah’s Witnesses beliefs kind of line up with the text of the Apostle’s Creed, but their interpretation of it largely diverges from common trinitarian interpretations. Here is the ELLC translation of the Apostles’ Creed, phrase by phrase: I believe in God, the Father almighty, Watchtower teaches that God is omnipotent and omniscient​, but not ...


9

In fact, Baptists do have a catchecism. As John Piper writes here: Written in 1677, "The Baptist Catechism" was patterned after the Heidelberg and Westminster catechisms to teach Reformed doctrine from a Baptist perspective. The problem isn't the existence, but rather how many Baptists are willing to "cede my author-ITAY" (imagine your best Cartman ...


9

A satisfactory answer requires that we examine the development of the Apostles' Creed through history. We'll deal with the question in three parts: Does today's version match that of the apostles? Does any version come from the apostles? When did today's version first appear? Does the current form of the creed come from the apostles? The strongest ...


9

It was a creed that was developed by the early church. It came into existence after the age of the apostles. However, it finds its biblical basis in the apostles. The Theopedia article says "its current form" is "more likely post-Nicene Creed in the early 4th Century AD." The Wikipedia article indicates it was a later form of the Old Roman Creed. The ...


9

Baptists*, in particular, are fond saying "We have no creed but the Bible." As this wonderful video shows, that is a creed, but it gets to the heart of your question - why do Baptists view creeds negatively? [Really - go watch the video. It does a better job than I will of explaining the reasoning, and debunking it!] There is one scriptural reason and ...


8

Let's start with the end of this sentence—the list of heresies. These can actually be classified under one or another of the descriptions you've highlighted. A greater or a less Arianism used the text of John 14:28, "The Father is greater than I", to argue that the Son of God was not truly God, but a lesser being who was begotten after God the Father....


8

Swedenborg himself had no problems with the Apostles' Creed and he did address it in his writings. It is to be observed, that in the Apostles’ Creed it is said, “I believe in God the Father, in Jesus Christ, and in the Holy Spirit”; in the Nicene Creed, “I believe in one God, the Father, in one Lord Jesus Christ, and in the Holy Spirit,” thus only ...


7

There is a fundamental misunderstanding here. The original word which is translated "church" in the English scriptures did not refer to a building. It referred to the community of believers. In New Testament times there were no buildings dedicated to Christian worship so the word could not have referred to it. The English word 'church' did not always refer ...


6

It is not clear that Mary made the decision entirely by herself; at the time, she was in France with her husband King Francis II, and they were both young (in August of 1560, she was 17 and he was 16). Mary's regent, her mother Mary of Guise, had only just died, and their court was dominated by the "Guise faction". The official reply to Parliament was in the ...


6

The 3 major creeds that every good Catholic knows about are The Apostles Creed The Nicene Creed (aka the Nicene-Constantinopolitan Creed) The Athanasian Creed There are definitely others, but if you want the 3 most oft repeated ones, you can see the rest of them here seems to me that wiki article is lacking a few creeds. Now, to find their meaning ...


6

When framed in terms of what can't be found in the Bible: Almost nothing can't be found in the Bible / You can find almost anything in the Bible. A wide variety of established beliefs are "Biblical" because, like most any non-technical document, it's vastly multi-interpretable. (And even technical language is multi-interpretable.) The creeds primarily ...


6

The official Orthodox answer to this question can be seen most clearly in the answers to two questions in the Revised Catechism: 094 What difference is there between the Persons of the Holy Trinity? God the Father is neither begotten nor proceeds from any other Person, he is the cause, source and principle. This is called the Monarchy of the Father. ...


6

The short answer is, they don't. They teach Sunday School. If you ask a Baptist, they'll probably tell you, we don't have a catechism. (Technically, they're wrong, but in practice, most haven't heard of it.) Furthermore, if asked to decribe what a catechism is, they will focus on the fact that it is a "rehearsed" set of formulaic questions and answers - ...


6

CreedThis word comes from the Latin verb credo, which means "I believe." A creed is a collection of articles of the faith* which are necessary to believe for salvation; "creed" can also refer to an individual article of faith. A Sovereign Pontiff can draw up a symbol of faith, and he must do so if the faith is endangered by errors; e.g., the Arian heresy ...


6

Like many other non-trinitarian groups, Oneness Pentecostals tend to be hesitant to align themselves too closely with any ancient creed, even one like the Apostles' Creed that is less clearly trinitarian than others (like the Nicene or Athanasian creeds). Still, some, like Steve Joel Moffett, apparently find trinitarianism within the creed: [The] common ...


5

The short answer is that The Bible itself claims to be God's authoritative Word, and as such, it is sufficient for teaching and preparing us to do God's will. (2 Timothy 3:16,17) Along with that, Scripture warn against following any "gospel" other than the one preached in the Bible, and that false doctrines/teachings would arise. (Galatians 1, 2 John 1:9-...


5

Although Caleb's answer is far better than this, I think you are asking something more philosophical that is hard to express.   First, I think the simple answer is that the Bible is not written as a system of theology, which a statemt of faith summarizes. It does not make precise general assertions with clearly defined logical deductions into a system of ...


5

The paramilitary organisations did not hold particular theological positions and members were not, in general, especially pious. They were, for the most part, members or adherents of their respective churches. For Protestants this was mainly Presbyterian and Anglican. Religious background, as a proof of allegiance and a guard against infiltration, was ...


5

Christadelphian beliefs impact on their view of the Apostle’s Creed, though that Creed is not something mentioned much (if at all) in their literature. Their literature does make it clear how antagonistic they are towards all the fundamental doctrines of what they call ‘Christendom’, so that we can conclude they would never subscribe to that Creed. To ...


5

On the contrary, the word "church" does appear in the Scriptures, and in a meaning completely congruent with the idea of "the church universal". Initially, it appears that congregations of "followers of the Way" - as Christians were called early on - gathered in individual houses; it wasn't until perhaps the early third century that buildings began to be ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible