27

God and Stephen Hawking, by John C. Lennox, is a popular direct reply to The Grand Design. Alister McGrath calls it "a brilliant response," and the book won an Award of Merit in Christianity Today's 2012 Book Awards. Whether it "makes sense," as you say, to Hawking, is perhaps debatable. But Lennox is no slouch: he's a Professor at Oxford University, ...


20

Jesus did not make an explicit statement on the matter, but he did seem to take Genesis as true and historical in some sense. Consider Jesus's words in Mark 10:6ff on divorce: "But from the beginning of creation, ‘God made them male and female.’ ‘Therefore a man shall leave his father and mother and hold fast to his wife, and the two shall become one ...


17

According to mainstream Christianity, the Holy Spirit is a person of the Trinity - loosely speaking a part of God. Therefore he was not created. He is eternal, without beginning and without end. This is best (though not necessarily most understandably) summed up in the Athenasian Creed: Such as the Father is; such is the Son; and such is the Holy Ghost. ...


14

As others noted, icr.org and answersingenesis.com have numerous articles on the subject. The argument is usually boiled down into the following points: 1) Accurate radioactive dating assumes that the decay rate of a radioactive material has not changed over time and is the same today as long in the past. 2) Dating of objects less than about 50,000 years ...


13

I think any question that contains "why does this need to be so" is fundamentally flawed. The truth is nothing needs to be how it is. God could choose do it anyway He wanted to, and He choose to do it this way. Now, We can speculate as to why He wants it that way, but short of scriptural support it's just speculation. That said, Yes i think the Bible ...


13

Those creationist Christians typically place the "extinction event" in Noah's day, thus long after the fall of the historic Adam. An example is from the well-known Young Earth model defender, Institute for Creation Research, who published a rebuttal in their 2001 article Chicxulub and the Demise of the Dinosaurs written by one of their scholars: ...


11

The Bible does recognise the existence of heavenly bodies of some sort, and the fact that they move and come and go during the year: Gen 1 14 And God said, Let there be lights in the firmament of the heaven to divide the day from the night; and let them be for signs, and for seasons, and for days, and years. However it calls them lights, which is how ...


10

There is no reason to limit information about the creation week to Genesis, but... 1) There are a number of good reasons to limit information about the creation week to Scripture. For instance, philosophically, the word of God is truth, and all men are corrupt and limited, which makes the revealed word of God the only reliable source for truth. 2) There is ...


9

The short answer is "yes, sort of". The only sub-group within Christianity that I'm aware of that cares about whether the animals in the Garden of Eden were originally carnivorous or not are the Young Earth Creationists. To other groups, it's simply a non-issue. Only within the young-earth paradigm do you get the idea that there was no physical death ...


9

The official statement on Science and Technology says in part, "We find that science’s descriptions of cosmological, geological, and biological evolution are not in conflict with theology. The Church also opposes introducing theories such as Creationism or Intelligent Design into public school curriculum. http://www.umc.org/what-we-believe/what-is-the-...


9

You're right, creationism, of whatever variety, is not scientifically falsifiable. Creationists do not think this is a problem. In fact, they would say that all alternatives to creationism are equally unfalsifiable. The scientific method cannot test the past; it may be able to tell us what is possible, what is likely and what is unlikely, but it ultimately ...


9

I'm Amish -- sort of.* You are correct that there is a lot of variation within the Amish tradition (and even more if you include Mennonites, another branch of the Anabaptist heritage), so I can't speak for all. However, I think I'd be fairly safe to say that many, if not most, of us believe generally in a young earth and a literal six-day creation. ...


9

There seem to be two basic questions here: In the original Hebrew manuscripts; the writer uses the word Elohim....From my research it seems 'Eloheim' doesn't exist in the Hebrew nor English vocabulary. Of course, in the "original Hebrew" manuscripts, no vowels were written, so technically no distinction could be drawn between these two forms. On the ...


9

John clearly and logically makes four statements : In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. The same was in the beginning with God. [John 1:1,2 KJV] 'In the beginning' states the moment of 'beginning'. If one existed at that moment, then that one has an existence that is independent of time. If independent of time, ...


8

Revelation 21:23 answers this rather directly. In imagining the new heaven and the new earth, it says: The city does not need the sun or the moon to shine on it, for the glory of God gives it light, and the Lamb is its lamp. John 1:5 concurs, saying: This is the message we have heard from him and declare to you: God is light; in him there is no ...


8

According to the Bible, God created no other people besides Adam and Eve. Adam was created from the dust of the earth, while Eve was created from Adam (perhaps his rib). Genesis 5 indicates that Adam and Eve had quite a few children. We have names for Cain, Abel, Seth, other sons (plural) and daughters (plural). So, at a minimum, they had seven ...


8

For Christians that are creationists, and that accept the doctrine of the Trinity, yes. From CARM.org, which believes and advocates both doctrines. The idea that Jesus is Creator is one of the arguments to support that Jesus is God. * CARM is not alone in this belief, but I decided to link to only one reference. To anyone who rejects the idea of ...


8

tl;dr> NO! For Lewis, Pleasure is temporary, Joy reminds us of what is to come First and foremost, I should admit that if the canon ever gets re-opened, The Great Divorce is my vote for book #67. :) That said, C.S. Lewis has a very definite idea in mind when he says "Infinite Joy". In The Weight of Glory he writes: “It would seem that Our ...


8

The answer can actually be found in the very next verse: 35 But only an account of this earth, and the inhabitants thereof, give I unto you. For behold, there are many worlds that have passed away by the word of my power. And there are many that now stand, and innumerable are they unto man; but all things are numbered unto me, for they are mine and I know ...


8

The Church of England has not taken a stand on the simplified 'creation versus evolution' debate. Many people investigating this have reported being unable to find a clear positional statement from the CofE, and there are quotes from church leaders stating that they believe there is no official position. This is an example. The church has made pronouncements ...


8

Doctrine and Covenants 107:53-56 53 Three years previous to the death of Adam, he called Seth, Enos, Cainan, Mahalaleel, Jared, Enoch, and Methuselah, who were all high priests, with the residue of his posterity who were righteous, into the valley of Adam-ondi-Ahman, and there bestowed upon them his last blessing. 54 And the Lord appeared ...


8

I think it's clear that your assumption is wrong, and that figurative interpretations of the Genesis were always common amongst scholarly interpreters, such as for example St. Augustine. At the very least, he thinks that the transgression in the Garden of Eden was in fact of a sexual nature, and therefore the account as it is, is figurative. Further, we are ...


8

As a YEC - I think David Stratton has presented a good overview of our belief regarding animals (and human beings) being herbivorous before the fall, and that we use the Bible as our only canonical writing (though as I commented on his answer, we do not believe that every word in the Bible is meant to be taken literally, there are many figurative and poetic ...


8

You appear to be slightly misunderstanding Zacharias's argument. Here are his four options: No world Amoral world (no such thing as good and evil) Constrained world (no possibility of choosing evil) Free world (possibility of choosing evil) Out of these options, he says that the fourth option, the actual Creation, is the only one in which love is possible....


8

The position of the Catholic Church is necessarily consistent with the position espoused by the pope, which position can also be described as having evolved since the middle of the twentieth century as: Pope Pius XII stated in his encyclical Humani Generis (1950) that there was no opposition between evolution and the doctrine of the faith and that he ...


8

In Trinitarian thought, God has one will and one action. Everything is accomplished by the Three Persons of the Trinity acting in unity. This applies to creation as well. The typical language is along the lines of 'The Father created through the Son in the Spirit', but there is always an emphasis that the Three Persons act in unity. Concerning creation St ...


8

To expand on GratefulDisciple's answer... ...the short version is that a lot of them don't. There are, as I see it, three-and-a-half options. GratefulDisciple already explained the "young-Earth Creationist" approach, which is to "reconcile" the two views by rejecting the Uniformitarianist worldview outright. There are many excellent ...


8

The literal answer is that YECs "account" for no such thing. They reject the accuracy of such dates, based on an alternate interpretation of the available evidence. However, that isn't very satisfying, so let's address the question you really want to ask, which is "how do YECs account for such supposed ages?". The short version is that ...


7

If you look over the account, God pronounced all of the things that he created "good," after he was finished creating them. But look at what it says about the darkness: the earth was without form and void, and darkness covered everything... and then God said "Let there be light" and Creation began. This implies that darkness wasn't something that God ...


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