27

As science suggests, the physical universe of time, space, and matter is not eternal. It had a beginning. Thus it was created. It was not arranged or mixed or reassembled, but created out of nothing. Genesis 1 repeatedly uses the phrase, "God said, 'Let there be...', and there was...". God spoke, and what previously did not exist began to exist. So, ...


27

God and Stephen Hawking, by John C. Lennox, is a popular direct reply to The Grand Design. Alister McGrath calls it "a brilliant response," and the book won an Award of Merit in Christianity Today's 2012 Book Awards. Whether it "makes sense," as you say, to Hawking, is perhaps debatable. But Lennox is no slouch: he's a Professor at Oxford University, ...


20

Ratzinger writes at such length as to obscure the point, in my opinion. If you read the Catechism of the Catholic Church, 283 (2nd ed.), the reasoning is spelled out in a brief and clear form: The question about the origins of the world and of man has been the object of many scientific studies which have splendidly enriched our knowledge of the age ...


20

Jesus did not make an explicit statement on the matter, but he did seem to take Genesis as true and historical in some sense. Consider Jesus's words in Mark 10:6ff on divorce: "But from the beginning of creation, ‘God made them male and female.’ ‘Therefore a man shall leave his father and mother and hold fast to his wife, and the two shall become one ...


18

Mormons do not believe in creation ex nihilo, as traditional Christian doctrine does. So to ask who created the universe in Mormonism is asking the wrong question. Rather, Mormons believe that god arranged pre-existing matter in creation. The matter always existed; creation was an act of organizing the matter. From Ancient Views of Creation and Doctrine ...


17

According to mainstream Christianity, the Holy Spirit is a person of the Trinity - loosely speaking a part of God. Therefore he was not created. He is eternal, without beginning and without end. This is best (though not necessarily most understandably) summed up in the Athenasian Creed: Such as the Father is; such is the Son; and such is the Holy Ghost. ...


15

No. The age of the earth is not clearly stated in the Bible. However, according to young-earth creationists (like myself), it can be derived, assuming that the word "Day" in Genesis means a literal day, and that the genealogies are accurate. Adding up the genealogies can give an age of about 6,000 years, but there are some gaps in the genealogies, and ...


15

God created the heavens and the earth as an expression of His glory. The heavens are telling of the glory of God; And their expanse is declaring the work of His hands. (Psalms 19:1 NASB) and The heavens declare His righteousness, And all the peoples have seen His glory. (Psalms 97:6 NASB) I think John Piper explains it nicely in Desiring God, ...


15

From the Westminister Shorter Catechism Question 1: Man's chief end is to glorify God, and to enjoy him for ever. Supporting verses: Psalm 86:9 (ESV) All the nations you have made shall come and worship before you, O Lord, and shall glorify your name. Isaiah 60:21 (ESV) Your people shall all be righteous; they shall possess ...


14

No textual reason for interpreting Genesis figuratively Whenever we ask why we should take something in the Bible as literal, we must start by asking ask why we should not take it as literal. Does the text give us any reason to interpret it as being figurative? In the book of Revelation, and other places where mortal man is given a glimpse of eternity, ...


14

Quite frankly, there are several viewpoints on this. There is no one answer to your question. Some Christians see evolution as a complete non-issue (but you asked specifically about creationists, so this group is outside of the scope of our desired answer). Some hold what are sometimes called "compromise positions" by young-earth creationists, such as the ...


14

Death through Sin The idea of "death through sin" in Romans 5:12 refers to Genesis 2:17, where God warns Adam not to eat the fruit of the tree of knowledge of good and evil. The NIV translation of Genesis 2:17 is questionable, so I'm offering four other translations, because the wording is important for understanding the passage: but of the tree of the ...


14

Based on the wording of your question, I assume you want a literalist/young earth creationist perspective. This isn't the only perspective in Christianity. Plenty believe in evolution, or one form of Old Earth Creationism or another. The last portion of this answer, on particular, will likely be jumped on by the OEC and Evolutionist crowds, as it's ...


13

Carbon-14 dating does give ages that are incompatible with a literal interpretation of the Bible. The question, then, is whether or not Carbon-14 is giving us valid data. There are quite a few assumptions used in Carbon-14 dating: The rate of C-14 decay (half-life) has always been the same. The C-14/C-12 ratio in the Biosphere (equilibrium) has ...


13

Job 38:4-7 “Where were you when I laid the foundations of the earth? ... When the morning stars sang together, And all the sons of God shouted for joy?" "Morning stars" and "sons of God" appear to be references to angels. (One could debate this, of course.) If they sang and shouted when the Earth was created, and according to Genesis 1 the Earth was created ...


13

Asking this question against all of "Christianity" turns this into an overview question of a very broad scope. In order to answer such a broad question, one must paint with broad strokes. There are two basic approaches taken. Deny the validity or applicability of any scientific claims that directly conflict with the origin of man being God's direct creation....


13

I think any question that contains "why does this need to be so" is fundamentally flawed. The truth is nothing needs to be how it is. God could choose do it anyway He wanted to, and He choose to do it this way. Now, We can speculate as to why He wants it that way, but short of scriptural support it's just speculation. That said, Yes i think the Bible ...


13

As others noted, icr.org and answersingenesis.com have numerous articles on the subject. The argument is usually boiled down into the following points: 1) Accurate radioactive dating assumes that the decay rate of a radioactive material has not changed over time and is the same today as long in the past. 2) Dating of objects less than about 50,000 years ...


12

There is nothing in the Bible that pins down the date. Just to give an alternative view to the speculation that exists in YEC (the existing answer), the (Roman) Catholic church has an official position that is in acceptance of the scientific age of about 4.5 billion years. I won't bother copying it all, but see Wikipedia under the heading "Pope Benedict XVI ...


12

It has something to do with God loving us. I think to understand it any better than that requires an understanding of the nature of the Trinity, not something that is possible from our point of view. I think the best way to look at it is using the metaphor Jesus used. He called God His Father, saw Himself as God's Son. And Jesus made it clear that God ...


12

John, I am providing a fairly 'long answer' as you seem genuinely interested. You have tapped into a long historical theme in the Bible with your question. The first occurrence of the actual words ‘new earth’ occurs here at around 700 BC: "Behold, I will create new heavens and a new earth. The former things will not be remembered, nor will they come to ...


11

In order to understand the meaning of any text, you must understand it's purpose. If you don't understand why a bit of text was written, you are quite likely to come away with a bad understanding of what it means. In this case your question assumes a mis-understanding of the purpose of the two texts in question. If you correct that understanding, it becomes ...


11

This can only be answered from a literalist Young-Earth Creationist (YEC) perspective, because to all other perspectives it's a moot point, so I'll answer from that viewpoint. I might as well throw in my usual disclaimer that I'm not debating whether the YEC view is true, this is just explaining the YEC view. Such debates in comments are off-topic and ...


11

The Bible does recognise the existence of heavenly bodies of some sort, and the fact that they move and come and go during the year: Gen 1 14 And God said, Let there be lights in the firmament of the heaven to divide the day from the night; and let them be for signs, and for seasons, and for days, and years. However it calls them lights, which is how ...


10

There is no reason to limit information about the creation week to Genesis, but... 1) There are a number of good reasons to limit information about the creation week to Scripture. For instance, philosophically, the word of God is truth, and all men are corrupt and limited, which makes the revealed word of God the only reliable source for truth. 2) There is ...


9

The reason God created anything at all is for His glory. (Isaiah 43:1-7 (esp v.7), Rev. 4:11, Col 1:15-16)This is a hard concept to grasp for anyone, even for a committed Christians. So the answer is that sin is there to glorify God. You may ask, "How does sin glorify God?" Sin glorifies God's attributes of justice and wrath, not His most popular ...


9

With all due respect to Mark Hausam, the logic just doesn't hold water. That sounds like a category error. Category Errors These fallacies occur because the author mistakenly assumes that the whole is nothing more than the sum of its parts. However, things joined together may have different properties as a whole than any of them do separately....


9

The bible is rather emphatic on the point actually. The universe we live in was not only created at God's command but it is sustained constantly through his active will. This sustainer is Jesus Christ: Colossians 1:15-17 (ESV) 15  He is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn of all creation. 16  For by him all things were created, in ...


9

The short answer is "yes, sort of". The only sub-group within Christianity that I'm aware of that cares about whether the animals in the Garden of Eden were originally carnivorous or not are the Young Earth Creationists. To other groups, it's simply a non-issue. Only within the young-earth paradigm do you get the idea that there was no physical death ...


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