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It has more to do with the translators and languages than the bible itself. The word Testament is derived from Latin testamentum-a will. I understand you confuse it with the modern meaning of the word, but Blue Letter Bible tries to explain it as follows: The word "testament" is an old English word that means, "covenant." The Latin term testamentum was ...


7

Honestly, there are a lot of questions there and rather than skip around I'm going to give one really long background on the birthright and blessing. Just be glad I'm not also giving a treatment to the meaning of firstborn. There is a TL;DR Conclusion at the end, where I will revisit each specific question. But first there is a lot of groundwork to lay. ...


6

I think it is as easy as you suspect. Hebrews does focus on the superiority of the New Covenant a little more from the ceremonial perspective than does some of the other Epistles, as this had more meaning to a Jewish audience. However this superiority of the blood of Christ, versus blood of bulls only has meaning as it satisfies the moral demands of the ...


6

Who first developed this concept of a covenant of grace? Much like the doctrine of the trinity, to proponents of the doctrine, the answer is, "It comes from the Bible." But obviously the actual historical development and refinement of definitions is less straight-forward than that. But do keep in mind that to those explicating covenant theology, all they're ...


6

Welcome to the group. I'm new here myself. Do those verses show that the Christian is more able to fulfill God's commands than the old testament believer was? No, they do not, but maybe not in the way you might initially think. Jer 31:33 and Ezek 36:26 are both in the OT, and indicate that they are the only way to fulfill God's commands. Your question ...


5

Since your question focuses on dual covenant theology's biblical basis, I will cite the main points and verses and leave you to research the major proponents' more complex arguments in their writings at your leisure: After the Great Flood, God imposed a set of laws on Noah and his family and their descendants (Genesis 9:3-10), which makes them binding on ...


5

It's not quite right to emphasize commandments. They are the Ten Words (dabar in Hebrew). They express so much more than mere commands. For example, this law that God establishes, these "commandments" and statutes and rules that He gives are founded on the fact that He has already saved His people. We see this in the giving of the law on Sinai. “I am ...


5

Here is a list of the covenants which the Bible explicitly describes God making. It is possible that there are other covenants (such as with Adam), but the Bible does not use covenantal language to talk about them. The Noahic covenant, which God made in Genesis 9:8-10 with all humans and land animals/birds, in which he promised to never again flood the ...


5

The Adamic Covenant is found in Genesis 3:16-19. As a result of Adam’s disobedience sin entered into the world, and death through sin. Death is the inescapable fate of ALL of Adam and Eve’s descendants. In other words, it applies to all humanity. That covenant has not been revoked. The Noahic Covenant, found in Genesis 9:8-17, is the promise that God ...


5

Are any of them everlasting ? There are thirteen references to the 'everlasting covenant' (KJV Old Testament) and one reference to 'the everlasting testament' (KJV New Testament) that I can find: Either these are fourteen different covenants referring to a variety of everlasting matters ... or they are fourteen different aspects of the one New Testament, ...


4

Yes, the New Covenant is a bilateral covenant, and Dan the Man covers many of the salient points. I would also like to add a few points from the book of Hebrews, which gives a beautiful and in-depth description of how the New Covenant is so much better than the Old Covenant (Starting in Heb 7:11 and running through the end of chapter 10). But first, here's ...


4

Yes, it is a bilateral covenant! This is the new covenant, Jeremiah 31:31-34 (NIV) : “The days are coming,” declares the Lord, “when I will make a new covenant with the people of Israel and with the people of Judah. It will not be like the covenant I made with their ancestors when I took them by the hand to lead them out of Egypt, because they broke my ...


4

Reformed theology's view of the "covenants" of scripture is that they are administrations of a single covenant, a covenant of grace. Thus the "new covenant" that Christ talks about is seen as something that in many ways had existed long prior. As Louis Berkhof writes: The covenant of grace, as it is revealed in the New Testament, is ...


4

Article VI of the Articles of Religion of the Church of England, which is accepted by most of the Anglican Communion, provides in part, that HOLY Scripture containeth all things necessary to salvation: so that whatsoever is not read therein, nor may be proved thereby, is not to be required of any man, that it should be believed as an article of the Faith,...


4

Outline from some RCIA material on the Six Covenants This outline is backed up by various Cathechism articles and the Catholic Encyclopedia. I have included some of the scriptural references that I have in the notes. The Catholic Church teaches that there are six covenants. But first ... What is a Covenant? God’s Covenants are ways that he reveals ...


4

In Covenant Theology, the Noahic Covenant is often called the "covenant of common grace" or the "covenant of nature." Still, it is seen as linked to the Covenant of Grace. This isn't the only place that a "covenant of common grace" or even a "universal covenant" appears in covenant theology. John Frame argues that the "Edenic covenant" (his preferred term ...


3

There are several views of the covenants within the Reformed/Calvinist camp, broadly defined. The traditional view is that the covenants are unified and that the New Covenant is new in the sense of "new and improved" rather than radically new (cf. Rom. 11 for how Gentiles are grafted into the continuing tree started with Abraham and in Gal. 3 how the law ...


3

In this sermon by James Orr, a prominent Presbyterian minister of the 19th century, we have some guidance on this question: http://biblehub.com/sermons/auth/orr/the_ratification_of_the_covenant.htm He makes a few points, here quoted: (1) Moses "builded an altar under the hill, and twelve pillars, according to the twelve tribes of Israel" (ver. 4). ...


3

What's the justification for believing that God interacts with us today the same way He did thousands of years ago? In a word: Experience. Consider the value the following men place on experience: “This grace of God is a very great, strong, mighty and active thing. It does not lie asleep in the soul. Grace hears, leads, drives, draws, changes, works ...


3

The Mosaic Law is best understood from its moral code as a renewed covenant of works first enjoined over Adam and the whole human race. However, it was so renewed with an inlaid ceremony, predicting the promise of a better covenant, according to grace in a future Messiah, that it did not contravene the previous covent of grace given to Abraham, according to ...


3

You have asked a great question and in order to answer it we have to do some reexamining of the Covenants, and what actually each means and with whom they were made. So bear with me this going to be a bit long winded. First Let's take them in the order in which each was made and with whom. Genesis 17:7 KJV And I will establish my covenant between me ...


3

The Heidelberg Catechism says that baptism has replaced circumcision. (Emphasis mine). Q & A 74 Q. Should infants also be baptized? A. Yes. Infants as well as adults are included in God’s covenant and people, and they, no less than adults, are promised deliverance from sin through Christ’s blood and the Holy Spirit who produces faith. Therefore, by ...


3

All the covenants are connected, not replaced or suspended. They work together and show us God's plan for Salvation. 2 Samuel 14:14 The promised "Seed" was the basis for salvation "under Adam". Then covenant with Noah was to remove the curse of the Earth, eventually or in the future in God's kingdom. The covenant "with Abraham" leads us to the promised "...


3

In brief: only some dispensationalists believe that Jews and Gentiles are currently under two completely separate covenants – most instead believe that there is one New Covenant that is applied differently to Jews and Gentiles. However, either way, the "old covenant" of Hebrews 8:13 is seen to be the Mosaic Covenant, as distinguished from the ...


3

A covenant is simply a binding agreement or treaty. A suzerain covenant is a covenant between a sovereign king (suzerain), in effect an emperor, and a vassal king and thus with the vassal nation. The terms of such covenants are decided by the suzerain king, they are not negotiated between the two kings. One of main issues of discussion amongst ...


3

We know that Paul refers to this passage in a spiritual type as circumcising the heart. Rom 2:29 But he is a Jew, which is one inwardly; and circumcision is that of the heart, in the spirit, and not in the letter; whose praise is not of men, but of God. Col 2:11 In whom also ye are circumcised with the circumcision made without hands, in putting off the ...


3

Does God 'replace' his covenant with Abraham ? What relationship does the 'new' covenant bear to the 'everlasting' covenant ? In Genesis 17: 3-14, God is quite clearly expressing two different covenants. One is an everlasting covenant with Abraham and his 'seed' (which is clearly, from hindsight, a spiritual seed). This is made clear in the New Testament ...


3

The angel of the Lord in Judges 2:1 speaks as Deity. Not as a representative of Deity but speaks as Deity, personally. The conclusion of what is laid out, competently, in the above question can only, logically, be that the 'messenger of the Lord' (the word is malak in Hebrew) is the same 'messenger of the Lord' referred to in, for example, Malachi 3:1, which ...


2

Answering from the Reformed perspective: There are essentially two covenants. The first covenant was with Adam, and is called the covenant of works. Adam was bound to obey the command not to eat of the fruit of the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil. If he obeyed, he would live. If he disobeyed, he would die. Adam disobeyed, and his sin, because of Adam'...


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