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The terms substance and person are (in the context of Trinitarian theology and Christology) Latin translations of the Greek terms ousia and hypostasis. The background from Greek philosophy. Plato and Aristotle were the ones who first formulated the terms ousia (substance or essence) and hypostasis (individual substance) in a philosophical sense. Plato did ...


5

The ubiquity doctrine is problematic to Catholics in that it does not acknowledge a "real" (substantial) change. Second, Lutherans reject Rome's identification of the bread and wine as the corporal body and blood of the Lord. At the Lord's Table, the bread remains bread; the wine remains wine. Luther, however, argued that there was a communication of ...


5

From what you've quoted of Ott, it sounds like this "Ubiquity* Doctrine" holds that Christ's human nature is His divine nature. This is the heresy of monophysitism,** which says that Christ only has one nature, not both human and divine natures. *(ubi- = Latin for "where" or "in what place")**(mono- = one; phys- = nature) It is not necessary, for ...


4

The Book of Concord condemns the adoration of the elements, though without specifically calling it idolatry: On the other hand, we unanimously reject and condemn all the following erroneous articles, which are opposed and contrary to the doctrine presented above, the simple faith, and the [pure] confession concerning the Lord's Supper; That the external ...


3

In the The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints the Eucharist is generally called "the Sacrament." Though priesthood authority is required to administer it, there is no concept of transubstantiation or cosubstantiation. The act of taking the bread and water is a token of rememberance of Christ and a renewal of baptismal and other covenants necessary ...


3

Impanation is the opposite of Transubstantiation. Transubstantiation: No Bread. Only Christ. Consubstantiation: Christ is present along with the bread Impanation: Christ is present as the substance of bread. That is "Christ has become bread". The following table might help you understand: Substance of | Bread | Christ | End Result -----...


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Why Calvin Errs Jesus' miraculously makes enough food for everyone, from a limited amount. The simple answer is the miracle Jesus performed prior to instituting the Eucharist: the miracle of superabundance. Jesus can take normal bread and normal fish (which are both examples of matter, body, flesh) of a limited amount and measure, and make it as abundant as ...


3

Here is a quote from a Lutheran theologian, Rev Paul T. McCain: The Lord gave it to us to eat and to drink, not to tuck away somewhere to “adore” it outside of its instituted use However, here is discussion of people attesting to adoration happening in their Lutheran churches. So it would seem there is confusion and debate about this among Lutherans ...


2

What is wrong with Luther's doctrine of ubiquity is that it flatly contradicts the Christological definition of the Ecumenical Council of Chalcedon: one and the same Christ, Son, Lord, only begotten, to be acknowledged in two natures, inconfusedly, unchangeably, indivisibly, inseparably; (ἐν δύο φύσεσιν ἀσυγχύτως, ἀτρέπτως, ἀδιαιρέτως, ἀχωρίστως – ...


2

Unlike perishable food that sustains the body, Christ's body in the Eucharist cannot be broken down and assimilated because His glorified body is incapable of harm. As St. Thomas Aquinas writes (Summa Theologica III q. 77 a. 7 co.): it cannot be said that Christ's true body is broken because it is incorruptible and impassible entire under every ...


1

This talk by LDS Apostle David A. Bednar entitled 'Always Retain a Remission of Your Sins' is a great compilation of LDS scripture showing how the sacrament ties into the essential saving ordinances of being baptized and receiving the Holy Ghost, and the continual need for repentance. It states that there's nothing metaphysical happening with the physical ...


1

As a former Lutheran, I was taught that the belief is that the sacramental union only persists through the liturgy, although the elements are still treated with respect afterwards. Wikipedia's description of Lutheran Eucharistic beliefs seems to confirm this: In most Lutheran congregations, the administration of private communion of the sick and "shut-in"...


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