11

This answer is based on the following 3 resources I found: A 2015 article Was Constantine the Great Baptized An Arian? A 2012 paper The Spread Out of Arianism. A Critical Analysis of the Arian Heresy published in the International Journal of Orthodox Theology A 2005 article How Arianism Almost Won by Christopher A. Hall published in Christian History Issue ...


8

Lactantius, in his Divine Institutes, refers to a god named Hesus: The Gauls used to appease Hesus and Teutas with human blood. (Chapter XXI) In addition, Wikipedia has an article on a god named Esus or Hesus which appears to fit the bill. But the name does not appear anywhere in Eusebius; neither do Krishna, Mithra, Zeus, or Horus. Thus, the quote ...


7

It appears that Emperor Constantine the Great is venerated as a saint in the Catholic Church, according to catholic.org: Constantine was the most dominating figure of his lifetime, towering over his contemporaries, including Pope Sylvester I. He presided over the Council of Nicaea, gave extensive grants of land and property to the Church, founded the ...


5

There is so much stupidity in this article I don't know where to even start (I would just trash the whole thing). Constantine returned to the gathering to discover that the presbyters had not agreed on a new deity but had balloted down to a shortlist of five prospects. That alone should be enough to ignore this entire article. Nicea was set up in order ...


5

The records of the 1st Ecumenical Council do not, I believe, include the discourse that preceded the condemnation against Arius and his followers. We do know, however, that Athanasius of Alexandria was key in the condemnation. He had written extensively against Arianism in his Four Discourses Against the Arians. We can assume, I think, that many or all ...


4

Constantine The Great was not an Arian at all. In fact he was quite orthodox in his thought and to further this notion he is considered a saint in both the Catholic and Orthodox Churches. Regarding Eusebius of Nicomedia’s confession of faith prior to the baptism of Constantine and during the First Ecumenical Council of 325, John Karmiris writes: ...


3

As a result of the Battle of the Milvian Bridge on October 28,312, the Chi Rho become a very popular Christian symbol. The Chi Rho is one of the earliest cruciform symbols used by Christians. It is formed by superimposing the first two letters of the word "Christ" in Greek, chi = ch and rho = r. Although not technically a cross, the Chi Rho invokes the ...


3

Despite my comment above, I'm happy to give you a few points that will help you on your way: Constantine's reign was significant to Christianity in (at least) 3 main ways: He was (arguably) the first Christian Emperor. He "legalised" Christianity - His edict of toleration (edict of Milan) gave Christians the freedom to worship without persecution. He ...


3

As regards the OP first question about biblical manuscripts, we need to distinguish between Constantine asking for copies of Scripture, rather than compiling Scripture. The link in the OP asserts the latter (bold mine). It was British-born Flavius Constantinus (Constantine, originally Custennyn or Custennin) (272-337) who authorized the compilation of ...


3

The chief reason that people put off Baptism had to do with the Roman tendency to be almost magical in their thinking about religion. Even when they had converted in their hearts, people who had civic duties, which inevitably involved performing some pagan rites, were extremely reluctant to break with tradition. And Roman society in general didn't tolerate ...


2

There appears to be a misapprehension of what the Trinity actually teaches. So that to answer some of the questions here posed would be to implicity accept as true something never posited for belief. For instance, What proof does anyone have that Christ was the same and identical as the one He called "Father" No trinitarian Christian believes that ...


2

The OP appears to ask about two things. One is biblical manuscript veracity and about historical sources regarding the existence of Christ. This answer is about the latter. There are a number of sources that attest to Christ Jesus as an historical figure. The Old Testament, of course, prophesies of a Messiah, but who? In the New Testament, we know of ...


1

The entry for Helena in a 1911 Dictionary of Christian Christian Biography and Literature to the end of the sixth century [etc] includes a review of "the evidence of the ancient authorities" regarding the story of her finding the true cross. The given summaries of 15 works attributed to authors writing from 333 to 595AD incidentally include several mentions ...


1

No, there is no historical basis. "Jesus" comes from the Hebrew, and "Christ" come from the Greek.


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