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While it is not an absolute requirement that Catholics be confirmed before they are married in the Church, confirmation before marriage is something the Church strongly urges. The Code of Canon Law states: Catholics who have not yet received the sacrament of confirmation are to receive it before being admitted to marriage if this can be done without ...


6

This comes under Canon B15A. The only essential prerequisite is baptism. Other than that: If you're a member of the C of E, you should be confirmed (or at least want to be confirmed) to take communion. Any baptised person who can take communion in their own church can take communion in the C of E. (Assuming their own church believes in the Trinity.) If you'...


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It's not even the fullest part of the suggested course at most churches. The fullest part of what is normally suggested is that one either picks the name of a saint or a virtue (e.g. Patience, Chastity, Hope, Faith, Courage, Wisdom, etc.). A common and very-much-encouraged divergence from this is to choose someone in your life (typically a dead relative) ...


5

According to the Catholic Encyclopedia, the sacrament of Confirmation comes directly from the beginning of the Church, as performed by the Apostles, and thus, it is part of the Oral Revelation (or Tradition, Living Magisterium), and partly seen in the Written Revelation (i.e. the Scriptures). The Encyclopedia states: The Sacrament of Confirmation is a ...


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This answer attempts to give an overview of the processes for gaining a Christian education in the Church. Depending on the denomination, this may be called catechism, confirmation, or discipleship. Throughout Christian groups, all encourage new converts to begin familiarizing themselves with the Bible by reading it and listening to it. In this answer, we ...


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The Catholic canon law 889 §1 says that those eligible to be confirmed are: "Every baptized person not yet confirmed and only such a person is capable of receiving confirmation" (My emphasis).


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Confirmation cannot be administered more than once. In the Catechism we read: 1304 Like Baptism which it completes, Confirmation is given only once, for it too imprints on the soul an indelible spiritual mark, the “character,” which is the sign that Jesus Christ has marked a Christian with the seal of his Spirit by clothing him with power from on high so ...


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Short answer: Yes, that is incorrect, because baptism in the Catholic Church makes you Catholic CCC 1213 Holy Baptism is the basis of the whole Christian life, the gateway to life in the Spirit (vitae spiritualis ianua), and the door which gives access to the other sacraments. Through Baptism we are freed from sin and reborn as sons of God; we ...


4

Confirmation as a sacrament in the Catholic Church was instituted by Our Lord Jesus Christ himself. As luchonacho points out this sacrament is well treated in the Catholic Encyclopedia. The Sacrament has definitely not always been conferred to those around 14 years of age, but is in reality a rather late development. Historical Development To ...


3

What does Western Catholic infant baptism and confirmation involve, especially with regard to being identified as a Catholic? Children baptized as infants are recognized as being Catholics, regardless if the parent really bring the child up in the Catholic Faith or not. All children who die and are baptized in the Church may be buried in the Church. Even ...


3

The Catholic Church is asking for proof that your husband is a baptised Christian, baptism being the "gateway to the sacraments." Can. 849 Baptism, the gateway to the sacraments and necessary for salvation by actual reception or at least by desire, is validly conferred only by a washing of true water with the proper form of words. Through baptism ...


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Technically, one does not absolutely need to be confirmed in order to be married. Canon 1065 section 1 of the Code of Canon Law reads Catholics who have not yet received the sacrament of confirmation are to receive it before they are admitted to marriage if it can be done without grave inconvenience. (emphasis added) What constitutes "grave ...


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Both the new and the old Catechisms have something to say in this respect, and approach the subject from slightly different angles. The Roman Catechism states in its article on Confirmation: We now come to treat of the component parts of the Sacrament, and first of its matter. This is called chrism, a word ... appropriated by common usage among ...


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Most(?) Anglican churches probably run confirmation classes. If anyone had solid reasons to not want to be confirmed those reasons would arise during the classes, so if they changed their mind right before the confirmation itself then that would be an impulsive decision, so I don't think there's much point looking for any regularities about that. What about ...


2

It is part of the Anglican service of confirmation that the Bishop lays hands on the candidate and says "receive the Holy Spirit". This has been true for a long time and is still true today. So no, this is not an outdated or unusual idea at all, and is widely believed by modern Anglicans. Different denominations do mean different things by "Baptism of the ...


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Your instincts are good. I found this answer here: The custom of adopting a saint’s name at confirmation was done in order to adopt the saint as a special heavenly patron or to honor a saint to whom one had a special devotion. In short, the purpose was to give the confirmand the opportunity to develop his understanding of and reliance on the ...


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By St Thomas's time, infant baptism would have been the norm for many centuries. However, confirmation has always had to fight for survival, in that it is not necessary for salvation and therefore once it was separated from baptism it was hard to get people to bring their children of any age to receive it on the rare occasions when the bishop happened to be ...


2

In some cultures, notably the UK but also others, the term 'Christian name' simply means (or used to mean) someone's first name. So David Cameron's Christian name is 'David'. The logic behind this is that babies were typically 'named' at their baptism, which typically occurred shortly after their birth. Going back thirty or forty years you would find ...


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In the Lutheran faith confirmation is not a sacrament as it is for Catholics. According to the book of Concord Article XIII(VII) confirmation does not meet the criteria which make a sacrament as it is not required by Gods direct command nor is there a clear promise of grace associated with it. I would say the caveat exists that it is at conformation where ...


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The Canadian and American Rites of Christian Initiation differ because it is basically permitted by Rome. ADAPTATIONS BY THE CONFERENCES OF BISHOPS IN THE USE OF THE ROMAN RITUAL In addition to the adaptations envisioned in Christian Initiation, General Introduction (nos.30-33), the rite of Christian initiation of adults allows for other ...


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If the Sacrament of Confirmation gives the gift of fortitude, why are we still afraid to do the right thing? The short answer is that our human nature is still damaged because of sin, both original sin and actual sins. Before getting into more details of this question, let us see what the Catechism of the Catholic Church has to say on the effects of ...


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To start out with: I agree with Nigel J that in my life-long experience as a protestant, water-baptism has not generally been made out to be a necessary act to receive the Holy Spirit. On the contrary, most messages I have heard specifically on baptism tend to emphasize that baptism is not necessary for salvation, although it is both beneficial and commanded ...


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Since then, I have wondered if baptised infants of Catholic parents are identified as being a member of the Catholic Church. Well, identified by whom? "Being a Catholic" is not, as far as I'm aware, any sort of metaphysical state in Catholicism in and of itself. We just have sacraments of initiation, and what they each represent and accomplish. Baptism is ...


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A bishop has the power to confirm, but this power can be delegated to a priest. See the Catechism of the Council of Trent's section on Confirmation: Minister of Confirmation Pastors should also teach to whom especially has been committed the administration of this Sacrament; for as, according to the Prophet, there are many who run without being ...


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There is no contradiction to the claims Joseph Smith made. The Holy Ghost is the convincing power of God unto [them] of the truth of the Gospel (from Joseph Smith quote) Cornelius and other's in the house felt the Holy Ghost witness to them of the truth. Verse 47 tells us that they felt the convincing power of God and Peter feels like there should now ...


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As far as the use of Christian name in the protestant faith seems to be a carry over from the Jewish tradition of giving the baby a name at circumcision. Luke 1:59 KJV And it came to pass, that on the eighth day they came to circumcise the child; and they called him Zacharias, after the name of his father. Exactly when and how this tradition began I ...


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