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The most notable position of the Adventist is the degree of Biblical Literalism. Generally, if the verses can have a literal meaning then that is the belief that they take. The outsider will notice some or all of these if they spend a short time with an Adventist: Worship on Saturday (after all, it is in their name. I will expand on this later). Not eating ...


25

The branches come from difference in opinion. Here is a diagram showing where Christianity diverged. Image source From the beginning Christianity diverged from Judaism1: where Christianity emphasizes correct belief (or orthodoxy), focusing on the New Covenant as mediated through Jesus Christ, as recorded in the New Testament. Judaism places emphasis on ...


20

From Catholic Answers article Does "no salvation outside the Church" include non-Catholic Christians?, non-Catholic Christians are specifically addressed in the Catechism: The Church knows that she is joined in many ways to the baptized who are honored by the name of Christian, but do not profess the Catholic faith in its entirety or have not ...


17

Not to be flip, but it sort of goes like this: Find some theological point on which you find your existing denomination to be so heretical as to be in grave danger of going to hell. Assume this point is not aidaphora. Find a bunch of other people who agree, and start meeting together. Possibly, ordain yourself (as in the case of Joseph Smith - the founder ...


17

Such a simple question, and so difficult to provide a simple answer! Probably the main reasons for Christianity dividing into branches and sects are: (a) issues of dogma: disagreements about points of doctrine some of which seem with hindsight to be incredibly hair-splitting, such as the precise relationship between Jesus' physical nature as a man and his ...


16

The differences are almost too great to list in an answer like this! The real problem in answering your question is that it isn't just a list of "things Roman Catholics believe" and "things Greek Orthodox believe". (NB that "Greek" Orthodox probably isn't accurate here: it's more accurate to talk in terms of "Eastern" Orthodox.) The problems are much more ...


15

This is a quick rundown, keeping in mind that not every individual parish fully subscribes to everything their parent organization does (don't judge a book by its cover, but be aware of the connotations each cover generally carries): Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS) The Bible is inspired and inerrant, the Confessions are a clear and accurate ...


14

I want to preface this by saying that I have never been a Freemason, and this answer, necessarily will include items that are likely to be disputed by those within Freemasonry. This can't be avoided if I'm to answer the actual question. The question is "Why do Evangelicals consider it to be incompatible". It's not asking if it really is, just why they ...


14

A Christian denomination is simply a group of churches which have agreed to work together (in over-simplified terms). Some denominations have very rigid structures, others not so much. They tend to share some degree of theological beliefs, but even within a denomination there may be a wide variance. A non-denominational church, by contrast, simply does ...


14

As a non-denominational Protestant myself, I will admit that our independent-mindedness makes it more or less impossible to predict what a particular individual will believe. However, if you would like to know what the hypothetical "average" non-denominational Protestant believes, then that is totally possible. The Hartford Institute for Religion Research ...


13

I think the incompatibility between the two philosophies is obvious from their names: Human-ism Christ-ianity Each tells us right in its name the value it considers most central and important. However, looking at the list, I think there is enough common ground for someone to be a Christian Humanist (just as some claim to be Christian Pacifists or ...


12

Before I can answer, I must clarify several terms that you are using incorrectly/ambiguously and define how I will approach this question. I also must begin with the disclaimer that I will be answering from an Eastern Orthodox perspective. Eastern Orthodox vs. Oriental 'Orthodox' vs. Nestorianism Nestorianism was condemned at the third and fourth ...


12

I am a Seventh Day Adventist. I was a Catholic for 55 years, and converted 10 years ago. I would like to respond to your question here. Sunday Worship as the mark of the beast. Ellen White specifically said that it is not now the mark of the beast. Some time in the future, laws will come into place requiring Sunday worship. (With the strength of Evangelical ...


12

CARM has said a few things about Joyce Meyer and has called some of her teachings heresy. [CARM was] glad to see an affirmation [in Meyer's teachings] of the Trinity, that man is a sinner, that without Jesus we can have no relationship with God, that salvation is a free gift, and eternal hell of conscious damnation. Some things Meyer has said that CARM ...


11

Yes. Every significant Christian tradition affirms the return of Jesus. The Nicene Creed, adopted by the Universal manifestation of the assembled church in 325AD and accepted by just about every mainline Protestant, Catholic, and Orthodox church with which the average Westerner will most readily identify affirms: He will come again in glory to judge the ...


11

Generally denominations form over church splits or mergers, rather than just appearing from scratch. The denomination I am a part of the PCA formed in the 70s after the mainline Presbyterian church (PCUSA) took a more liberal leaning than many of the southern Presbyterian churches were willing to go along with. They left and formed their own denomination. ...


11

At the most fundamental level, Roman Catholics subscribe to the Nicene Creed, Jehovah's Witnesses do not. (JWs would call the Creed itself heresy, so this is not a slam.) This means that unlike 98% of the world's Christians, Jehovah's Witnesses deny such things as: The Trinity The Divinity of Jesus The Nature of Salvation The Communion of Saints / The Role ...


11

The other answers here are good, but I'll try to directly address some questions with more detail. And this is the sort of question where a lot of answers are "it's complicated, and no one perspective is correct." As you stated, there are three "main branches" of Christianity, with most branches and sub-branches claiming to be the one, holy, catholic, and ...


10

Background Although Calvinism and Arminianism are often presented as polar opposites, they have a common heritage. Jacobus Arminius studied under Calvinist teachers and was himself a Calvinist when he began his ministry. So it's not a surprise that the two systems share a common framework. But Arminius eventually questioned some of the tenets of Calvinism, ...


10

To answer the question directly: The important point in the 4th item is "this one life": meaning - we shouldn't be looking to some reward/punishment in some promised afterlife (or: staus in reincarnation, for some religions) to justify or rationalise our actions in this life. Rather, we should do things because they are reasonable/ethical things to do, and ...


10

Evangelicals stem from fundamentalists, but have diverged since the 1950s. Theologically, they hold much in common, but primarily differ in their approach to dealing with society at large. It should be noted that neither is a "denomination" but rather a reforming trend that is cross-denominational, but bound by common purpose to reform the church, stripping ...


9

According to Wikipedia, the Amish (aka Amish Mennonites) are a group that broke off from the Mennonites in Switzerland in 1693, led by Jakob Ammann, from which the name comes.1 While Amish reject many modern technological advancements, Mennonites have a broader range of acceptance of such things. Some Mennonites are quite similar to the Amish, while others ...


9

The short version is that they are not related at all. In fact, in many major ways they are quite opposite to each other. The Jehovah Witnesses are a "reconstructionist" sect that began in the late 1800's. They do claim to be Christian, but the reason I use the label reconstructionist sect is that they believe they are the only true Christian church, and ...


9

The 39 Articles are the foundational document of Anglicanism (though not all Anglicans accept them now). The major points of difference with Catholicism which are explained in the Articles are: Anglicanism does not accept the books of the Apocrypha as inspired. (Article 6) Anglicanism says that our righteousness before God is based only on the merit of ...


9

Two significant groups at least loosely associated with Protestantism that don't observe communion are The Salvation Army and the Quakers. The rationale for the Salvation Army's position is more fully explained here: Why does the Salvation Army not administer the sacraments of baptism and the Lord's Supper? But the short version is that they don't observe ...


8

That's funny to see that we all lack of information (see my answer which asked exactly the opposite, that is to say if some protestant church believed that Catholics were pagans). In any case, reading the already mentioned CCC 838 and also other paragraphs, it's quite clear that Catholic church believes that everybody can find salvation if their heart ...


8

While I am not familiar with any denomination that practices footwashing as part of communion celebrations, I can address an issue that is implicit in the questions. Descriptive is not the same a prescriptive In other words, just because the Bible describes some people as doing something that doesn't mean all Christians should always do that too. As an ...


8

On the whole, yes, virtually all traditions expect his return. The only exceptions I know of are theological liberals, who don't regard the Bible or its foretellings (even on the lips of Jesus) to be reliable, and some few preterists (viz., sometimes called full preterists or hyper-preterists, in distinction from partial preterists, who do expect a final ...


8

Basically, a lot. Jehovah's Witnesses are not really related to Pentecostalism For one thing, Jehovah's Witnesses teach that the Watchtower literature is the most accurate interpretation of scripture, while Pentecostals believe in scripture being relevant to modern life without having to rely on the leadership of a church to lead them; the Jehovah's ...


7

Just as a note (and I, personally, find it the most problematic of the humanist position), but this quote cannot, in any way, be reconciled with Christian thought: To be ethical, acting in a way that puts human welfare at the centre of morality As a Christian, human welfare cannot be at the center of your morality. The first and greatest commandment, the ...


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