42

From your comments you are asking about the case where governments have made regulations in response to a pandemic (Covid19) preventing in-person meetings, or limited their size, and not given churches specific exemptions from those regulations. Many church leaders have explained their response to Covid19 regulations, and most are very similar so I will ...


16

I found an article from the Jehovah’s Witness official web site that indirectly answers your question. It uses the example of governments using income taxes to pay for wars and points out that it is the responsibility of governments to decide how tax payers’ contributions are spent: Watchtower 1 April 1975 – Are you guided by a sensitive Christian ...


8

I found a quote I like from an online news source called The Week (emphasis mine). Like everything else in this world, Romans 13 makes sense within its broader context. And in the New Testament, this broader context is a big, raised middle finger at the government of the day, the Roman Empire. After all, Rome killed Jesus. And Paul is not short of contempt ...


8

Jehovah's Witnesses believe that according to Romans 13, we must pay taxes even if they are used to fund something that we disagree with, such as war, abortions, or blood transfusions. At first this might seem to be offensive to a person's conscience, but we try to see God's perspective, that these governments are temporarily allowed to operate only by his ...


6

The Bible tells Christians to pray for those in positions of authority. Such authorities include government officials (international, national, and local) and pastors, church elders, school boards, school principals, employers, and the like. There is an underlying principle behind this: Let everyone be subject to the governing authorities, for there is ...


5

According to this source The tradition of using the Bible in oath-taking likely comes from ninth-century England, where, without dedicated governmental centers, the altar of a church often served as the courtroom for oaths and contracts. Gospels began to be used in the contractual ceremonies, and, eventually, the tradition migrated into English courtrooms ...


5

Jehovah’s Witnesses take seriously the direction in the scripture to “pay back Caesar’s things to Caesar.” We are obliged to pay the taxes that are demanded by the governments under which we live. Much of these funds go to beneficial things and much goes toward things we may object to on a personal level. For example the funding of military expenses that ...


5

It is easy to make decisions when one chooses between two paths, one of which is obviously right and one which is obviously wrong. One puts aside any inclinations of greed or other fleshly motivation and one does the right, because it is right and one accepts the consequences, come what may. But what is more of a conflict is when one must choose between two ...


4

But what about situations where government law prevents Christians from worshiping, praying and singing in church? There is no Christian requirement to gather together in a church, or to pray or sing aloud, as should be clear from the tradition of hermits living in holy isolation. (One could even make an argument that effectively turning your house into a ...


4

Christians around the world have been forced to meet in secret at various times and places throughout history, and even today there are many countries where Christians must hide to avoid persecution. Different countries have different levels of religious freedom. In the United States, we have a constitutional guarantee that the federal government will not ...


3

The instruction not to swear an oath using God's name, throne, altar, etc. from the text is an injunction against invoking Him in order to add more gravity or credibility to what is being said. It comes in the context of Jesus taking many of the commandments of God (no murder, no adultery,...) and stripping away outward obedience to reveal that conformity at ...


2

Where in Holy Scriptures does it say that he who cannot govern himself cannot govern others? As @curiousdannii & @NigelJ pointed out, 1 Tim 3:5 is probably the closest NT single-verse match (Douay-Rheims translation): But if a man know not how to rule his own house, how shall he take care of the church of God? Since you are looking for OT Wisdom ...


2

This issue affects all Christians where the state has issued restrictions on worship due to the Coronavirus pandemic. A non-denominational group that serves all Christians on legal issues sent out their newsletter ( http://www.christian.org.uk ) which pointed out that “the clear aim of the central and devolved governments has been to save lives. This is a ...


1

Q: Is there any biblical support for the Church to allow Government to close its doors and prevent public worship? Unfortunately, the way this is phrased is a "bad reason" fallacy or worse a "red herring" fallacy. For Christians, there is no Church building per se. Believers are the church. Now ye are the body of Christ, and members in ...


1

Every Christian must surely be keen to support their government in its unenviable task of trying to contain and then to (hopefully) eradicate this awful pandemic. An immense amount of prayer is going up to God, that governments get the knowledge and help they need to deal with this killer virus. In harmony with those prayers, Christians are strenuously ...


1

The key to understanding the passage is in the words: "Let your yes be yes, and your no, no." "Swear not at all," isn't a abolishment of all forms of oaths or swearing, but rather a command for Christians to be honest, and to create a society in which 'I swear!' should not be necessary. Say the truth; say what you mean.


1

Do Christians foresee contradicting Government requirements in prolonged 'lockdown' conditions? It is obvious that some individuals will contradict government requirements in prolonged lockdown situations and that will more than likely involve a few Christians of various creeds. One thing is for sure. For Catholics, it is frowned upon, as Pope Francis has ...


1

Why did the Bishop of Rome accept (and retains until today) the title “Pontifex Maximus” and how were the rights and duties transferred/transformed? Your source states that the Emperor Gratian gave up the title of Pontifex Maximus in 382 AD and then transferred it to Pope Damasus I. Indeed, it was not until the Empire split in two, with the Western Empire ...


1

It is worth to describe in some detail that the title "Pontifex" pre-dates Christianity. According to Livius, the title was originally for (elected) high priests of the Roman religion, as mentioned in the Lex Ogulnia (300/299 BCE). The pontifex maximus was 'the greatest' or chairman of the college of the pontifices, 'priests'. They were responsible ...


1

Denominations with a liturgical tradition often have prayers specifically for the government, and there is no assumption that such a government will be godly. For example here are two prayers from the Anglican Church of Canada: for Elizabeth our Queen and all the Royal Family, for N the Prime Minister and for the government of this country, for N ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible