13

Not really sure it is enough for an answer, but feels too long for a comment; as with here, it primarily seems to be people who feel that the label "Christian", regardless of it's origin and literal meaning, has too many associations (perhaps more in the people they interact with than themselves). As an example, there are phrases often used in media and ...


10

Martin Luther had not intended to separate from the Catholic Church. His 95 theses, and his conduct immediately after he posted them, were intended to achieve reform in the Catholic Church. When he was excommunicated by Rome, he had to either give up his quest for reform or continue to pursue it outside the Catholic Church. Bear in mind that there may ...


9

To some extent the trend stems from the 2007 book unChristian. The authors surveyed young American adults (late teens to early 30s) and found that the words this group most commonly associated with "Christian" were: judgmental antihomosexual hypocritical too political sheltered The book challenges Christians to move away from behaviors and activities that ...


9

Multiple definitions of Christian Despite meaning "those who belong to Christ" word Christian is often regarded to mean "Christ-like". On some level, this means that any religious movement or group which seeks to be "like Christ" and claims to follow Christ can make a case for being "Christian". While mainstream Protestantism often defines "Christian" in ...


8

The word church has various meanings. It can be used to refer to an physical building. Witness churches are called Kingdom Halls. It can also be used to refer to a group of believers in a specific area. For sense of the word, Witnesses use congregation, which I believe is quite common for many branches of Christianity. But the word church has another ...


8

None. Every time the Bible presents the belivers it presents them in a context of a group. The biblical christian (believer in the Bible) always get together in houses, underground. Here are a few passages tackling this subject: Romans 12.3-8 1 Corianthians 12.12-31 1 Peter 2.4-5 Heb 10.25 The argument advanced by the non-church goer is all over the place, ...


7

In the words of Jesus: Matthew 18:15-17 (NIV) 15 “If your brother or sister sins, go and point out their fault, just between the two of you. If they listen to you, you have won them over. 16 But if they will not listen, take one or two others along, so that ‘every matter may be established by the testimony of two or three witnesses.’ 17 If they still ...


7

It seems the definition of Christian, at least in America, has become so broad as to include so many disparate teachings that it really fails to distinguish a devoted Christian from one who rejects the Bible and most of its teachings. "Follower of Jesus" is, perhaps, a way to make this distinction. "Followers of Jesus" are not Christian in name only, but ...


7

1 Corinthians 5:9-13 seems to tell Christians not to use man-made laws to force non-believers to live or behave according to Christian beliefs. Instead, it tells them to disassociate themselves with those WITHIN THE CHURCH who behave immorally, and to leave those outside the church to God's judgment. 1 Corinthians 5:9-13 King James Version (KJV) 9 I ...


6

Rather than answer all the questions I'm going to stick with the main question. Q. What is the Biblical justification for different denominations? A. What is the Biblical justification for one Church? There should never have been different denominations (or branches of belief) but as Paul stated here in Eph 4:1-16. There is only one body of believers, ...


6

And when the scribes and Pharisees saw him eat with publicans and sinners, they said unto his disciples, How is it that he eateth and drinketh with publicans and sinners? When Jesus heard it, he saith unto them, They that are whole have no need of the physician, but they that are sick: I came not to call the righteous, but sinners to repentance. ...


5

I spent a long time as a non-church going christian. My reasoning was based in tradition/culture. I looked into several churches and one of the few things they all agreed on was that if I picked the wrong church I was going to hell. So to not pick the wrong church I picked no church. I didn't have the time to look into over 40,000 (or however many there ...


5

I would suggest that all ritual in general did not pass away simply because the edicts of the old law was fulfilled. There is a lot that Tradition speaks to in terms of ritual use within the context of the Church as evidenced by what we know early Christians did, however, since you asked for a biblical reason, I might point you to the passages surrounding ...


4

Leviticus 19:18: Thou shalt not avenge, nor bear any grudge against the children of thy people, but thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself: I am the LORD. It would appear that this pastor may be an example of this quote: Matthew 7:15: “Watch out for false prophets. They come to you in sheep’s clothing, but inwardly they are ferocious ...


4

Richard's answer isn't really teaching for separation of church and state, but rather evidence against fighting it. It shows we are to obey the authorities, but it doesn't say the government cannot be a specific religion. Jesus never taught to keep it separated (that is recorded at least), so it cannot be taken as doctrine. At the same time, he also never ...


4

As is so often the case with questions such as yours, it's not a matter of "either/or" but "both/and." Let's put it this way: the comparison between the church universal ("the holy catholic Church"--the Apostles' Creed) and a body is both an analogy and a metaphor. The expression of the church as a body is presented perhaps no more clearly than in 1 ...


4

Saint Augustine, an African theologian who was one of the most significant post-Biblical Christian thinkers in the early church, was heavily influenced by Plato. His descriptions of God the Father can be connected directly with Plato's Form of the Good, an immaterial, eternal, perfect entity that is the source of all good within the universe. Given the ...


4

Greek manuscripts were written in the Greek uncial script from approximately the 3rd century BCE through the 12th century CE, and Latin manuscripts were written in the Roman majuscule script from the 7th century BCE through the 4th century CE. But even after miniscule script began being used, 'catholic church' was still rarely capitalized in the literature ...


4

I don't believe that St Augustine was talking about unity at the cost of scripture. In those times, it was much more difficult to obtain original-language manuscripts, and much more difficult to find people who were competent enough to analyze them (as St Jerome was). Translation necessarily involves at least some change in meaning, and both men recognized ...


4

To understand why religious ritual and ceremony are still important, we must first understand what it means to say that Jesus is the fulfillment of the law. Fulfill does not mean abolish (Matthew 5:17). The purpose of the ceremonial law was to serve as a visible reminder to the Jews of the invisible God they worshipped. For Christians, Jesus serves as that ...


4

Apart from any claim related to antiquity, does the modern Roman Catholic Church claim to be" The Body of Christ"? The short answer is: Yes. Pope Pius XII's encyclical Mystici Corporis Christi (Mystical Body of Christ) (June 29, 1943) should count as being on topic for this post? And, if so, keep reading. Although Pope Pius XII states in his encyclical ...


3

The altar and the sacrifice of the Mass are Sacred tradition, but the sacrifice of the Mass is not a guilt offering or a sin offering, but a thanksgiving offering and a thanksgiving offering is one that can still be offered even in these last days, after God Himself came to save us from our sins. The first possible day for the Apostles to worship God in the ...


3

As an Augustinian monk himself who tried desparately not to leave the church, but rather only to reform it, I think this would be a hard claim for someone to make of Luther. That said, the "invisible church" or what we moderns would probably call "real Christians" is always a subjective term. I'm sure he thought many clergy weren't truly Christian, but I ...


3

The question itself is inherently flawed, for several reasons (and thus any attempt at an answer is thus fallacious and mistaken): Off the top of my head: Any claim to be the true Church outside of demonstrating it historically amounts at best to 'good persuasion' (yes, as subjective as it sounds) to your personal (i.e., not historical) interpretation of ...


2

Interpretation of @Richard's previous answer aside I know of nothing in the New Testament that either endorses or condemns the concept of the separation of church and state. However, in Romans Paul instructs Christians to submit to the authorities that we are subject to. Let every person be subject to the governing authorities. For there is no authority ...


2

Revelation 21:2 personified the New Jerusalem as a bride. 2 And I saw the holy city, New Jerusalem, coming down out of heaven from God, prepared as a bride adorned for her husband. As we know through Scripture, New Jerusalem will be the city those in Christ will call home. With this description, the marriage would be between the Lord and the New ...


2

In Jehovah's Witness theology, "the Church" is restricted to 144,001 humans who form the heavenly government, with the risen Jesus Christ as its head. The others (the 144,000) are humans from earth who are selected to go to heaven and reign with Christ in the heavenly aspect of God's kingdom, over the earthly aspect. In their "Insight on the Scriptures" ...


2

Certain numbers had symbolic significance to the people of that era. Numbers like 7 and 12 had connotations of wholeness or completeness. (Not completely unlike modern-ish phrases like going the "whole 9 yards"). Bible numbers The 12 tribes were established from the 12 sons of Israel/Jacob, who was himself the son of Isaac, who was the promised son of ...


2

Here's how Luther describes his break from Rome taken from his Table Talk: The chief cause that I fell out with the pope was this: the pope boasted that he was the head of the church, and condemned all that would not be under his power and authority; for he said, although Christ be the Head of the church, yet, notwithstanding, there must be a ...


2

Besides antiquity, and continuity, the Roman Catholic Claims of being the Universal Church is also under-girded by an ancient Ecclesiology that is found in scripture, namely that "the Church is One". When you take this principle together with the notions of antiquity and continuity you have something of a three fold knot (Ecclesiastes 4:12). There are many ...


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