10

Multiple definitions of Christian Despite meaning "those who belong to Christ" word Christian is often regarded to mean "Christ-like". On some level, this means that any religious movement or group which seeks to be "like Christ" and claims to follow Christ can make a case for being "Christian". While mainstream Protestantism often defines "Christian" in ...


10

Martin Luther had not intended to separate from the Catholic Church. His 95 theses, and his conduct immediately after he posted them, were intended to achieve reform in the Catholic Church. When he was excommunicated by Rome, he had to either give up his quest for reform or continue to pursue it outside the Catholic Church. Bear in mind that there may ...


8

The word church has various meanings. It can be used to refer to an physical building. Witness churches are called Kingdom Halls. It can also be used to refer to a group of believers in a specific area. For sense of the word, Witnesses use congregation, which I believe is quite common for many branches of Christianity. But the word church has another ...


8

1 Corinthians 5:9-13 seems to tell Christians not to use man-made laws to force non-believers to live or behave according to Christian beliefs. Instead, it tells them to disassociate themselves with those WITHIN THE CHURCH who behave immorally, and to leave those outside the church to God's judgment. 1 Corinthians 5:9-13 King James Version (KJV) 9 I ...


6

Rather than answer all the questions I'm going to stick with the main question. Q. What is the Biblical justification for different denominations? A. What is the Biblical justification for one Church? There should never have been different denominations (or branches of belief) but as Paul stated here in Eph 4:1-16. There is only one body of believers, ...


6

And when the scribes and Pharisees saw him eat with publicans and sinners, they said unto his disciples, How is it that he eateth and drinketh with publicans and sinners? When Jesus heard it, he saith unto them, They that are whole have no need of the physician, but they that are sick: I came not to call the righteous, but sinners to repentance. ...


5

I would suggest that all ritual in general did not pass away simply because the edicts of the old law was fulfilled. There is a lot that Tradition speaks to in terms of ritual use within the context of the Church as evidenced by what we know early Christians did, however, since you asked for a biblical reason, I might point you to the passages surrounding ...


4

Greek manuscripts were written in the Greek uncial script from approximately the 3rd century BCE through the 12th century CE, and Latin manuscripts were written in the Roman majuscule script from the 7th century BCE through the 4th century CE. But even after miniscule script began being used, 'catholic church' was still rarely capitalized in the literature ...


4

I don't believe that St Augustine was talking about unity at the cost of scripture. In those times, it was much more difficult to obtain original-language manuscripts, and much more difficult to find people who were competent enough to analyze them (as St Jerome was). Translation necessarily involves at least some change in meaning, and both men recognized ...


4

To understand why religious ritual and ceremony are still important, we must first understand what it means to say that Jesus is the fulfillment of the law. Fulfill does not mean abolish (Matthew 5:17). The purpose of the ceremonial law was to serve as a visible reminder to the Jews of the invisible God they worshipped. For Christians, Jesus serves as that ...


4

As is so often the case with questions such as yours, it's not a matter of "either/or" but "both/and." Let's put it this way: the comparison between the church universal ("the holy catholic Church"--the Apostles' Creed) and a body is both an analogy and a metaphor. The expression of the church as a body is presented perhaps no ...


4

Saint Augustine, an African theologian who was one of the most significant post-Biblical Christian thinkers in the early church, was heavily influenced by Plato. His descriptions of God the Father can be connected directly with Plato's Form of the Good, an immaterial, eternal, perfect entity that is the source of all good within the universe. Given the ...


4

Apart from any claim related to antiquity, does the modern Roman Catholic Church claim to be" The Body of Christ"? The short answer is: Yes. Pope Pius XII's encyclical Mystici Corporis Christi (Mystical Body of Christ) (June 29, 1943) should count as being on topic for this post? And, if so, keep reading. Although Pope Pius XII states in his encyclical ...


3

The question itself is inherently flawed, for several reasons (and thus any attempt at an answer is thus fallacious and mistaken): Off the top of my head: Any claim to be the true Church outside of demonstrating it historically amounts at best to 'good persuasion' (yes, as subjective as it sounds) to your personal (i.e., not historical) interpretation of ...


3

The altar and the sacrifice of the Mass are Sacred tradition, but the sacrifice of the Mass is not a guilt offering or a sin offering, but a thanksgiving offering and a thanksgiving offering is one that can still be offered even in these last days, after God Himself came to save us from our sins. The first possible day for the Apostles to worship God in the ...


2

In Jehovah's Witness theology, "the Church" is restricted to 144,001 humans who form the heavenly government, with the risen Jesus Christ as its head. The others (the 144,000) are humans from earth who are selected to go to heaven and reign with Christ in the heavenly aspect of God's kingdom, over the earthly aspect. In their "Insight on the Scriptures" ...


2

Revelation 21:2 personified the New Jerusalem as a bride. 2 And I saw the holy city, New Jerusalem, coming down out of heaven from God, prepared as a bride adorned for her husband. As we know through Scripture, New Jerusalem will be the city those in Christ will call home. With this description, the marriage would be between the Lord and the New ...


2

Certain numbers had symbolic significance to the people of that era. Numbers like 7 and 12 had connotations of wholeness or completeness. (Not completely unlike modern-ish phrases like going the "whole 9 yards"). Bible numbers The 12 tribes were established from the 12 sons of Israel/Jacob, who was himself the son of Isaac, who was the promised son of ...


2

Besides antiquity, and continuity, the Roman Catholic Claims of being the Universal Church is also under-girded by an ancient Ecclesiology that is found in scripture, namely that "the Church is One". When you take this principle together with the notions of antiquity and continuity you have something of a three fold knot (Ecclesiastes 4:12). There are many ...


2

Here's how Luther describes his break from Rome taken from his Table Talk: The chief cause that I fell out with the pope was this: the pope boasted that he was the head of the church, and condemned all that would not be under his power and authority; for he said, although Christ be the Head of the church, yet, notwithstanding, there must be a ...


1

The Papacy. St Ambrose in the fourth century said: Ubi Petrus ibi ergo Ecclesia which means Where Peter is, there, consequently, is the Church. The Church of Rome believes a) Jesus entrusted to St. Peter primacy over the other apostles and b) that St Peter became the first Bishop of Rome and c) that subsequent Bishops of Rome have inherited that ...


1

Twelve = Abundant Completeness of God's Blessings The number twelve is suggestive of abundant completeness, particularly in terms of blessings (as opposed to the number 40, which is usually associated with complete punishment or adversity, e.g. the flood, Moses' exile from Egypt, years wandering in the wilderness, Jesus' fasting in the wilderness, Jewish "...


1

Jesus told several parables about weddings and feasts, such as the parable of the ten bridesmaids/virgins. These parables are about the Jews who should have been prepared for Jesus' coming to earth, but instead refused him. So one common interpretation is that it will be the faithful Old Testament Jewish saints who will be the guests - those who had faith in ...


1

I don't know that you could term it a "justification", but a Biblical basis for understanding why so many different denominations exist can be found in the same letter to the Corinthians that you cite (11:19): For there must be also heresies among you, that they which are approved may be made manifest among you. The NASB (from which I think you are ...


1

My answer is from a Seventh Day Adventist perspective, a subset of the protestant view: The church is not yet the kingdom In Daniel 2, prophecy depicts a succession of kingdoms, ending with a stone that breaks into pieces all the other kingdoms of the world and rules forever. God's kingdom will not be established until the kingdoms of the world are done ...


1

There is only one kingdom because there is only one king. The kingdom was offered to Israel and not accepted at that time. The kingdom will come and a remnant of Israel will glady receive her king. Gentiles were being added to the kingdom during the period of Acts. This was a mystery that Paul describes had been hidden. The end of Mark describes a little ...


1

I am one who considers himself a "follower of Jesus", while generally avoiding the "Christian" label. That is because I believe in ACTIVE SUBSTANTIAL obedience to the sayings of Jesus of Nazareth, first and foremost. I hold these sayings as sacred above ALL OTHER sayings and scripture, and I reject any and all interpretations of scriptures which might tend ...


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