12

The churches of the Anglican Communion recognize the validity of Holy orders conferred by the Roman Catholic Church, so that a Bishop, Priest or Deacon who converted from Catholicism to Anglicanism, would remain a Bishop, Priest or Deacon, and could serve in the appropriate roles in the Anglican Church, subject to the relevant canon(s) of the various ...


9

The Church of England has not taken a stand on the simplified 'creation versus evolution' debate. Many people investigating this have reported being unable to find a clear positional statement from the CofE, and there are quotes from church leaders stating that they believe there is no official position. This is an example. The church has made pronouncements ...


8

Archbishops in the Church of England, as a rule, must retire on or before their seventieth birthdays. However, in special circumstances, the Queen can grant an extension of up to one year. Archbishop Sentamu will be 70 on June 10th 2019. In the ordinary course of events therefore he was scheduled to retire on June 10th, 2019, unless he announced he wished ...


7

This comes under Canon B15A. The only essential prerequisite is baptism. Other than that: If you're a member of the C of E, you should be confirmed (or at least want to be confirmed) to take communion. Any baptised person who can take communion in their own church can take communion in the C of E. (Assuming their own church believes in the Trinity.) If you'...


6

Here is a list of all the official Anglican statements of belief that talk about hell: The 39 Articles of Religion Contrary to what you say, the 39 Articles do mention hell, in Article 3: As Christ died for us, and was buried; so also it is to be believed, that he went down into Hell. The Book of Common Prayer The word "hell" appears in two ...


6

In the Roman Catholic Church canon law forbids marriage between first cousins. The same applied in England before the Reformation, but since then the Church of England has allowed marriage between first cousins. Even within the Catholic Church it is possible for a dispensation to be granted allowing marriage to occur in specific cases even when forbidden by ...


6

At the end of the Holy Communion service in the Church of England Book of Common Prayer are 9 rubrics (i.e. rules or notes) the seventh of which begins: And note, that every Parishioner shall communicate at the least three times in the year, of which Easter to be one. Prior to the Reformation, constitution 21 of the Fourth Lateran Council, 1215, ...


5

According to Sir Thomas More: Biography, Facts and Information and according to The last letter of Sir Thomas More, 1535 the Act of Succession was that which began the events leading to More's execution. It was the Act of Succession, passed the following month, that sealed his fate. It stated that all who were called upon must take an oath acknowledging ...


4

The original question was whether a member of the C of E can marry a Roman Catholic in an Anglican ceremony, in a C of E church, according to C of E precepts. As it transpires Meghan is not RC so the example is irrelevant to the basic question. Purely according to C of E rules, so ignoring any RC precepts, the answer is yes. A Protestant and a Roman Catholic ...


4

This is just to add slightly to Nigel's excellent and informative answer, specifically on the "loophole" allowing More's family to "remain Catholic" (as referred to in the question). At that time no change had been made to the services of the English Church. Loyalty to the pope did not require an English person to stop going to his or her parish church, or ...


4

The page linked to in the question shows two versions of the Prayer over the Water which were introduced in 2015. These are alternatives, in "accessible language", to the main Prayer over the Water in the Common Worship baptism liturgy. The Common Worship baptism liturgy is itself an alternative to the Book of Common Prayer baptism liturgy which, alone, is ...


4

The Church of England cannot and does not of itself regulate the behaviour of the general British population. Church laws apply only to clergy and to members of the church, and sanctions against ordinary church members are limited to church matters. In other words an ordinary member can be punished only by things like expulsion from the church. Even then ...


3

The Canon Law of the Church of England, in point A2, states: The Thirty-nine Articles are agreeable to the Word of God and may be assented unto with a good conscience by all members of the Church of England. These articles are actually printed at the back of the Book of Common Prayer, the official prayer book of the CoE. Finally, whenever a bishop is ...


3

The survey in question was commissioned by a group called "Cost of Conscience". This is, or was, a group within the Church of England which was originally opposed to the ordination of women priests, and later to lady bishops. It also aimed to protect the interests of persons opposed to women priests, for example by campaigning for the right of parishes to ...


3

Michael Nazir-Ali, former Anglican Bishop of Rochester, published a Comment on page 16 in today's Daily Telegraph regarding the Queen's speech. He made a plea for Churches to reopen for Easter in order to give people hope and to allow Holy Week processions. With regard to prayer, he said this: Numerous studies have shown the importance of the spiritual ...


3

Wikipedia says Though she attended Catholic school as a child, Markle identified as a Protestant prior to her engagement to Prince Harry. Following her engagement, it was announced that she would be baptised and confirmed into the Church of England before the wedding. She will also become a British citizen. Despite Markle's status as an American divorcee, ...


3

I'm no expert, but will attempt a partial answer - first, the educational qualifications refer to:- BA - Bachelor of Arts MA - Master of Arts (traditionally awarded automatically to Oxford graduates one year after graduating) BD - Bachelor of Divinity AM - I think another description on of MA. A clerk would probably refer to a clerk in holy orders - ...


3

There are three things which are necessary for a sacrament to be valid. The form, the matter, and the intent. I once heard a priest say that he could come riding into the Church naked, on an elephant, and so long as he had unleavened bread and wine, said the mass using the right words, and intended for the Mass to be valid, it would be. Having read the Book ...


3

In the Church of England you need to be able to answer the questions asked of godparents truthfully and sincerely: Parents and godparents, the Church receives these children with joy. Today we are trusting God for their growth in faith. Will you pray for them, draw them by your example into the community of faith and walk with them in the way of ...


3

The Church of England website has several prayers composed with regard to the current pandemic. https://www.churchofengland.org/more/media-centre/coronavirus-covid-19-guidance-parishes/coronavirus-covid-19-liturgy-and-prayer Many of these follow the typical Church of England practice with regard to the direction of prayer. That is they are addressed to God ...


2

The Church of England doesn't generally have a published doctrinal stance on this sort of thing. However, there is a passage in the Catechism which might be relevant. What is thy duty towards God? My duty towards God is to believe in him, to fear him, and to love him, with all my heart, with all my mind, with all my soul, and with all my strength; to ...


2

The Act of Supremacy made no alterations to the services, worship or doctrine of the Church of England apart from rejecting Papal authority. It was initially what today we might call a very soft Brexit. Throughout Henry VIIi's reign the requirement for auricular confession (one-to-one with a priest) at least once per year. remained in force. This had ...


2

It was not prescribed in the Act of Supremacy, which occurred in 1534 (see that info further below). It looks like the rights to confession were first included in the "39 Articles of Religion," a small book with revisions throughout the years. Several sources confirm that these articles were drawn up in 1563 but I managed to find "An Essay on the 39 Articles ...


2

The answer to your question looks like "yes" based on interfaith dialogue The Anglican and Catholic Churches issued a joint position on "mixed marriages" in 1975. The contracting parties are the ministers of Holy Matrimony. When one party is Anglican it seems to us entirely reasonable that the parties should decide between themselves whether they ...


2

I am sure we shall all rest easier in our beds tonight knowing that the Church of England regards itself as responsible only for the behaviour of their clergy. The statement they issued (for which they are now apologising) was not directed at every person in Britain. ITV News, 31 January 2020: Church Apology after Guidance Declares Sex Only for Married ...


2

This is just to add a little to luchonacho's answer. It first describes the legal position of the 39 Articles which is that they are definitive doctrine. It then looks at the level of Commitment to the Articles required from clergy, describing how this is now much weaker than once it was. It next considers the breadth in which they can be interpreted and ...


2

I will add to brasshat’s answer the perspective of the Catholic Church. As brasshat mentioned, the Catholic Church does not, in general, recognize the validity of Anglican Holy Orders (see Apostolicae curae, especially number 36), hence—unless a particular cleric can prove that he has obtained valid Holy Orders, say, from an Orthodox bishop—it must conclude ...


2

The list is not exclusive - curates are ordained. (Did you mean, ordinand - someone who is training for ordination?). Also there are several statuses for lay people who are not ordained: licensed lay minister - someone who's not ordained but has a leadership role in a church. recognised authorised Depending on what your purpose is, you could simply ask ...


1

Christening and Baptism are the same, and the Church of England doctrine is that it can be administered only once to any child. The usual arrangement was for the baby and godparents to go to church. The godparents, speaking on behalf of the baby, renounced the devil, declared belief in the Christian creed and expressed the intention to obey God's will and ...


1

The Church of England is an extremely diverse church in terms of doctrines and practices. Much of Anglican liturgy and doctrine is deliberately designed to be inclusive. Anglo-Catholic Anglicans will, as you say, understand the prayer to be a priestly blessing, specifically through the water, that will be effective on the child. They will probably choose ...


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