New answers tagged

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The anti-Catholic Eurasians in the 1920s. Archpriest Georges Florovsky (1893-1979) was an Orthodox priest from (Imperial) Russia, who was associated with what theologian Paul Gavrilyuk calls the Eurasian movement. See Gavrilyuk's essay "Florovsky's Neopatristic Synthesis and the Future Ways of Orthodox Theology", collected in Orthodox Constructions of the ...


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In the New Testament, Jesus never prescribes or approves of any particular canon Jesus doesn't anywhere speak of the canon,1 except to refer to common ways of dividing them: "the Law and the Prophets" (Matthew 5:17), "the Law, the Prophets, and the Psalms" (Luke 24:44; cf. 24:27). This latter one is significant for our purpose becaues among the Jews, the ...


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Did Jesus reject the apocrypha? Nowhere in Sacred Scripture has Our Lord rejected the Apocrypha. Who has the authority to declare what is Apocrypha and what is not? The comment of Lucian is quite revealing to say the least. If such a rejection would indeed have existed, then the presence of references to pious pseudepigraphical works on an even lower ...


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What liturgical languages were used in the worldwide church/broad christiandom around 500 AD? The liturgical languages around the year 500 AD where as follows: Aramaic (Syriac) Armenian Old Georgian Latin Koine Greek Geʽez referred to in some scholarly literature as Classical Ethiopic. Coptic Egyptian Christian rites, rituals, and ceremonies are not ...


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I think we get the negative aspects of "religion" directly from Jesus as He addressed the religious leaders and their hypocrisy. According to the verse in James, pure and undefiled religion is all about relationships. The greatest commandment, love the Lord your God with all of your heart, mind, soul and strength, and love your neighbor as yourself is all ...


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Summary The dichotomy started when some Christians (notably, evangelicals) began to define "religion" along the lines of this one: Religion is a set of rules that people must follow in order to obtain God’s blessing. Since Christians are saved by grace (and not by works), Christianity would not be a religion according to this definition. Source: ...


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Was there a time when bishops were not appointed to other sees and did not generally ever relocate? The simple answer is yes. In the Early Church, the bishop of a diocese was chosen by the local clergy and not appointed to the diocese by the pope. Thus transfers to other articles sees was extremely rare, if not non-existent. It was however not unheard of ...


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Was Eastern-Orthodox liturgical music influenced by Islam? The short answer is: It is seriously doubtful. It is seriously doubtful considering that the Prophet Mohammad (c. 570 AD – 8 June 632 AD) only came on to the world scene in the late 6th to early 7th centuries. It may in fact be that the opposite could be true. The Pre-Byzantium Era In the ...


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Constantine The Great was not an Arian at all. In fact he was quite orthodox in his thought and to further this notion he is considered a saint in both the Catholic and Orthodox Churches. Regarding Eusebius of Nicomedia’s confession of faith prior to the baptism of Constantine and during the First Ecumenical Council of 325, John Karmiris writes: ...


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This answer is based on the following 3 resources I found: A 2015 article Was Constantine the Great Baptized An Arian? A 2012 paper The Spread Out of Arianism. A Critical Analysis of the Arian Heresy published in the International Journal of Orthodox Theology A 2005 article How Arianism Almost Won by Christopher A. Hall published in Christian History Issue ...


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While I know nothing about how the Church perceived the stories concerning the Holy Grail (this answer claims that the Catholic Church has no official opinion), the answer is a solid no, simply because the Holy Grail was not invented by the Church in the first place. The first appearance of such thing as the Grail was in the romance Perceval, by Chretien de ...


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This question already has a lot of answers, but I feel like the most basic answer is missing! The answer is yes, and we need look no further than the Bible. Titus himself was a gentile convert. We learn this in Galatians 2 Galatians 2:3 nkjv - Yet not even Titus who was with me, being a Greek, was compelled to be circumcised. For the sake of being ...


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Whilst doing my own research I found two articles that touch on the subject. I simply want to post these in addition to the other two useful answers already given: Cornelius (Greek: Κορνήλιος) was a Roman centurion who is considered by Christians to be the first Gentile to convert to the faith, as related in Acts of the Apostles. The baptism of ...


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The earliest list of Gentile bishops in Christianity would be those after the first 15 bishops. The first 15 were of Jewish descent who served as bishops of Jerusalem from the time of Christ's death until the second major persecution under Roman Emperor Hadrian during the Bar Kockba Revolt about 135 CE. The first Jewish bishop was James the brother (same ...


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Were any of the early church leaders Gentile converts to Christianity? The short answer seems to be yes. But a secondary question comes into play here. What sources is one willing to accept? According to Catholicism, there are some examples of Gentile converts who went on to become Church leaders such as Bishop and others positions of authority. Let’s ...


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