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John Calvin wrote in 1542 about the duty he felt he had to minister to those in the plague hospital outside the city, should the minister who had volunteered before him, Peter Blanchet, not survive. The pestilence also begins to rage here with greater violence, and few who are at all affected by it escape its ravages. One of our colleagues was to be set ...


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Pope St. Gregory the Great started liturgical processions to combat the plague at Rome! At the end of the 6th century, a severe plague ravaged the city of Rome, even claiming the life of Pope Pelagius II. It was a difficult time for the people of the city, and when Pope Gregory I was elected to lead the Church, he immediately set out to call upon the mercy ...


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Cyprian wrote the following during the plague of 250 AD to remind his diocese that Christians are not to expect special protection from disease: It disturbs some believers that the power of this Disease attacks our people equally with the unbelievers, as if the Christian believed for this purpose - that he might have the enjoyment of the world and this ...


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Martin Luther writing to Johann Hass: Use medicine; take potions which can help you; fumigate house, yard, and street; shun persons and places wherever your neighbor does not need your presence or has recovered, and act like a man who wants to help put out the burning city. What else is the epidemic but a fire which instead of consuming wood and ...


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Introduction: The Gospel Standard is a Strict Baptist magazine first published in 1835 by William Gadsby. Churches which align themselves with the magazine are known as "Gospel Standard Baptists" or "Gospel Standard Strict Baptists". https://www.gospelstandard.org.uk/Magazines/Overview Here is an extract from an article about the ‘English Strict Baptists’ ...


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You're not the only one. My interest was piqued by reading Simone Weil who was an admirer of Catharism and although they are described as dualists, wikipedia writes: The idea of two gods or deistic principles, one good and the other evil, was central to Cathar beliefs. This was antithetical to the monotheistic Catholic Church, whose fundamental principle ...


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The Carolingian Renaissance produced much reforms, including in the church, as well as much learning, patronized by Emperor Charlemagne and his grandson Charles the Bald. See Ken Graham's answer for more details. But in the area of Ethics, the area the OP was focusing, the period "did not give rise to innovation in moral thought", according to a 1992 book ...


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What innovations in ethics occurred within Christendom during the 9th Century? To start with, Charlemagne banned work on Sundays in 789. In the West, Emperor Charlemagne in 789 banned work on Sunday as a violation of the third commandment of God. In 1234, under Pope Gregory ІХ, the law of Sunday rest became a universal practice in the Latin Church. - ...


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The surviving church fathers's writings contained the still-united Church's defense against one of the earliest heresies: Gnosticism. But we only read the church's side of the argument. Not until the Nag Hammadi discovery 75 years ago that we are now able to learn the Gnostic's own voice through their own writings. St. Irenaeus (c. 130 - c. 202) wrote ...


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Prior to Lateran II, clerics could contract valid marriages,* but they were illicit (illegal). Lateran II made such marriages also invalid: *although they could not legally be consummated, because clerics have always been required to be 100% continent (perpetually refrain from sexual intercourse) Adhering to the path trod by our predecessors, the ...


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Looking at the whole new testament just as it is and looking at the state of Christians of our time, it is very clear and without a doubt that the word "Christianity"` which also means "follower of Christ" or "Christlike" was used by others to mock the believers. In John 19, we see how even Jesus was beaten and called names to mock Him. he had a sign on his ...


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Dr. Robert Dean Luginbill, a Christian Professor of Classics outlined a plausible theory for the origin of the word "Christian" with extra-Biblical and manuscript support. As many suspected (the OP, guest37, Ray Butterworth, and some commentaries I consulted), Dr. Luginbill also believed that it's the outsider who started the name "Chrēstian" (χρηστιανος, ...


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