4

Christianity has long been debating the relationship between God's will and human wills in our salvation, probably all the way back to the very early church. The debate between Reformed and Arminian Protestants is only one part of this broader debate. Augustine vs the Pelagians Pelagianism is a position, now considered heretical by all major Christian groups,...


2

Calvinism did not exist before the 16th century. In the context of the Reformation, Huldrych Zwingli began the Reformed tradition in 1519 in the city of Zürich. His followers were instantly labeled Zwinglians, consistent with the Catholic practice of naming heresy after its founder. Very soon, Zwingli was joined by Martin Bucer, Wolfgang Capito, William ...


2

The Catholic concept we're talking about is dulia: a theological term signifying the honour paid to the saints, while latria means worship given to God alone, and hyperdulia the veneration offered to the Blessed Virgin Mary With respect to Augustine, there are a couple of possible sources here: We regard the martyrs with the same affectionate intimacy ...


2

When God created Adam and Eve they were without sin. Although it is true that sin entered into the world because Adam and Eve disobeyed God, and that we are all sinners, God did not create man in order to sin. Indeed, after Adam and Eve sinned God provided the permanent solution to sin - Christ Jesus. We are all sinners, and we continue to struggle with sin ...


2

If spiritual healing, being translated from death to life, is acceptable within the scope of OP's question parameter regarding healing crusades then I would say that Peter's first sermon in Acts 2, in which 3,000 were saved, should qualify as the earliest example of an open air evangelism campaign: Now there were dwelling in Jerusalem Jews, devout men from ...


1

What are the origins and history of the practice of holding massive healing crusades in large stadiums or arenas? First of all, John Mee’s response to this question seems to be on the right track. In our modern are this whole idea of holding any sort of religious rally, crusade, mission or healing services in large stadium actually was influenced by no other ...


1

"Revival" is perhaps the starting point for researching the modern-day crusades. Or research "Awakenings" for examples from recent centuries. For example the First_Great_Awakening of the 1700s. The Wikipedia "Revival" page has some ideas to get you started. The Billy Graham Crusades is perhaps what springs to mind first for ...


1

Yes. I can recall two instances in my own life as a Baptist. Returning from Christmas caroling cold and tired, before I lay down for a nap, I asked God in prayer if He had anything for me to do. Twenty minutes later I awoke, refreshed. I heard a voice say, "Help!" I asked, "Who?" Then I heard the name of a friend spoken. I called her on ...


1

Are there any accounts of “words of knowledge” taking place outside of Pentecostal and Charismatic denominations? The short answer is yes. In Christianity, the word of knowledge is a spiritual gift listed in 1 Corinthians 12:8. It has been associated with the ability to teach the faith, but also with forms of revelation similar to prophecy. It is closely ...


1

OP: How did the practice of holding massive healing crusades in large stadiums, arenas or similar spaces begin? How has it evolved over the course of history? What are the denominations most frequently involved in this practice? In America, there have been a noted four great awakenings. It appears the physical healing revivals only began during the Third ...


1

I realise you asked this question five years ago, and an answer may no longer be needed, but I was curious, so here is a summary of what I found, starting with an introduction: The Presbyterian Church of Korea (PCK) is based in Seoul, South Korea. However, its inception took place in Hwanghae Province, current North Korea. There, Sang-Ryun Suh founded the ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible