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If Williams had erred with his previous belief that the formula comes from St Augustine, its source may be a "Dogmatic Poem" of St Gregory of Nazianzus (ca. 329-390): ... Thou art the purpose of every creature. Thou art unique. Thou art each one and art not any. Thou art not a single creature nor art thou the sum of creatures. ... (Gregory ...


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I cannot say where in St. Augustine the phrase may be found, but there's a reference in Spenser's Images of Life to an essay by Victor de Waal, "The History of Doctrine", Life of the Spirit, xviii (1964), 533. This may give the answer. I do not have the essay (for I have no access to the JSTOR materials), but here's a link: https://www.jstor.org/...


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How much authority does Pseudo-Dionysus still have in today's Catholic Church? The works of Dionysius were readily accepted by the medieval Scholastics. His works were not so highly valued during the the period of the Renaissance and thus broke with the time-honoured tradition of holding them in high esteem. There is too much uncertainty surrounding ...


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It seems that the Catholic Answers website misattributed the quote to Pope Clement I. The quote appears in Chapter 11 of the Epistle to Diognetus (AD 80-130), which can be read at the New Advent website: The Epistle of Mathetes to Diognetus. The entirety of Chapter 11 with your quote highlighted: I do not speak of things strange to me, nor do I aim at ...


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I think this question is something about the wisdom and God’s Devine plan and the Virgin Mary is the handmade of God included in His wisdom and Devine plan. Regarless whether Adam had sinned, Christ still would have incarnated according to St. Thomas Aquinas. St. Thomas Aquinas (in his Summa Theologica) states that God’s power is not limited and therefore ...


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