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37

From this discussion, if "three days and three nights" is taken idiomatically, it means 3 days as the Jewish people of the day would have understood it. Now lets take a look at Jesus time in the sepulchre: Part of Friday = one dayspan. All of Saturday = one dayspan. Part of Sunday = one dayspan. Literally three days and three nights? ...


32

The "AD/BC" way of counting dates that you want dates to 525 AD by Dionysius Exiguus. Prior to that, people kept time in "regnal" time, meaning that they would count the Xth year of the reign of Y. Since the Old Testament was pretty much complete by 400BC (nearly a milennia earlier) and the New Testament by 95 AD, it would be every bit as odd to see an "AD/...


27

Of course this is more of a historical-archeological question as the Bible does not directly answer but I have stumbled across a fairly convincing argument that would place Thutmose II as the Pharaoh at the time of the Exodus. I first came across the argument in Alfred Edersheim’s Bible History. He typically pays attention to ancient monuments and secular ...


22

This is a fairly common question, and there is a very good answer. A detailed answer can be found here and here. These are some of the highlights. It is important to note that Luke mentions that the census to which he is referring is the first census taken while Quirinius was governing. This seems to indicate that at the time of writing, the readers ...


17

Job 1:15 and 1:17 refer to raids by the Sabeans and Chaldeans respectively. The Sabeans are a bit tricky to identify, but the Chaldeans (Hebrew kasdim) are definitely a Babylonian tribe. They were one of the groups to sack Nineveh after the death of Ashurbanipal. The Chaldeans were around for quite a while before that - Genesis 11:28, 11:31 has "Ur of the ...


17

The phrasing of Matthew 12:40 is an anomaly. The bulk of the New Testament testimony is that Jesus was resurrected, not after three days but on the third day: Matthew 16:21 ...and on the third day be raised. Matthew 17:32 ...and on the third day he will be raised. Luke 9:22 ...and on the third day be raised. Luke 18:33 ...and on the third ...


16

This issue will be debated for a long time. However, Henry H. Halley addresses this issue with great clarity. In his book, Halley's Bible Handbook, Zondervan Publishing House, Grand Rapids, Michigan, 113, "There are two leading opinions: Amenhotep II (1450-1420 B.C.), or Merneptah (1250-1220 B.C.). Merneptah was the son of Rameses II, who was a master ...


15

One theory: It's not the easiest thing to follow, but The Star of Bethlehem has a very interesting hypothesis on the subject. The information is all there, especially in footnotes, but unfortunately it's not presented very clearly on the site itself... they want you to get the video.* The upshot is that the date is most likely 3BC, and maybe 2BC. You get ...


13

Typically, Jonah is dated to the period of Jeroboam, i.e 780 - 750s BC, whereas Nahum is dated to either shortly before (615BC) or after (612BC) the fall of Assyria (and its capital, Nineveh). Thus, Nahum is at least 150 years after Jonah. So, to answer the question directly, No - Nahum is not the promised vengeance of God against Nineveh promised by God in ...


13

But there are dates in the Bible, and as all dates, they are relative to something. In this case, relative to the reign of a king: Nehemia 2:1 1 And it came to pass in the month Nisan, in the twentieth year of Artaxerxes the king [...] Jeremiah 1:2 2 To whom the word of the Lord came in the days of Josiah the son of Amon king of Judah, in the ...


12

My new understanding of the Last Supper is mostly based on the information at http://www.therefinersfire.org/celebrating_passover.htm. The key verses which indicate that Christ was actually crucified on the day before the Passover feast are John 18:28 and John 19:14. John 18:28 NIV Then the Jewish leaders took Jesus from Caiaphas to the palace of the ...


12

No, the Bible does not. This is the last mention of the ark in the Old Testament: 2 Chronicles 35:3 And said unto the Levites that taught all Israel, which were holy unto the LORD, Put the holy ark in the house which Solomon the son of David king of Israel did build; it shall not be a burden upon your shoulders: serve now the LORD your God, and his ...


11

In order to understand the meaning of any text, you must understand it's purpose. If you don't understand why a bit of text was written, you are quite likely to come away with a bad understanding of what it means. In this case your question assumes a mis-understanding of the purpose of the two texts in question. If you correct that understanding, it becomes ...


11

This is sort of a combination and customization of several commentaries I perused on the subject, being curious myself. As I am not directly copying any one of them I am not adding individual quotes. The two that most influenced my opinion here is Edersheim and someone called Arthur Sloman. If you read the verses carefully you will notice Luke does not ...


10

I think that Biblically the Good Friday tradition doesn't stand up to scrutiny. The traditional view tends to forget that since it was Passover there would be an additional Sabbath in the chronology. We can see a hint of this in the difference between Mark 16:1 and Luke 23:55 regarding the purchasing of spices by the women. See this website for a detailed ...


10

Two things are clear from scripture: The "last supper" was in fact a passover meal. Multiple references in Mark 14, Matthew 26 and Luke 22 make it clear that the disciples prepared a passover meal. In Matthew Jesus says "I am going to celebrate the Passover with my disciples at your house." In Luke it reads "So they prepared the Passover. When the hour came,...


10

70 years David was thirty years old when he became king, and he reigned forty years. 2 Samuel 5:4


9

Genesis 5:3 says: When Adam had lived 130 years, he had a son in his own likeness, in his own image; and he named him Seth. By virtue of this, we know that Cain killed Abel within 130 years of Adam being born, because Seth was not born until after that occurred. This means that the Fall had to occur within that time. Other than that, the Bible is silent.


9

As much as the Jubilee is important in Scripture, there is no evidence that one was ever actually declared in Israel's history. This is noted as such by Jeffrey Fager and D.P. O'Brien in unrelated papers. As such, there is no base from which to calculate the 50th year. More to the point for this question, there is no archeological or historical evidence ...


8

The best way to find this estimate is to take known historical dates and work backwards from there using dates and durations in the Bible. The Mesha Stele has been dated to about 840-850 BCE, and seems to pretty clearly describe the time of Omri. If we assume it was written when the events happened, not long afterwards, we can use it to work backwards. ...


8

Christ died during Passover, which is around Spring in Israel, which is in the Northern Hemisphere. I think it's still cold early in the morning during that time, right? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Passover#Date_and_duration


8

Chronology is certainly one really good way to organize the books of the Bible, and some people may prefer this. There certainly are editions of the Bible in chronological order that are available. It should be noted that the order of the books of the Bible is not inspired, so you are really free to organize them however you want. One of the problems with ...


7

The method of deducing each date, along with the difficulties associated with each method, are documented at cresourcei.org In short: The older date (1440 BC) is primarily based on the assumption that the Bible is a reliable historical document, with the passage of time based solely upon dates and time periods given from within Scripture. Example: 1) ...


7

The last book of the Old Testament, Malachi, was written about 443 B.C. The first book of the New Testament, Matthew, was written about 40 A.D. leaving a 500 year gap between the Old and New Testament books. Second would be Joshua (~1450 BC) and Judges (written by Samuel ~1100 BC)


7

Because both the Gospel of Mathew and Luke agree that the birth took place before the death of Herod (who died in 4 BC), historians generally assume Jesus was born around 5 BC or slightly before. Source: WikiPedia


7

The short answer is: No one knows. You might think it would be a simple matter of saying, "The Exodus occurred in such-and-such a year, look up who was Pharaoh in that year, problem solved." But in practice scholars debate just when the various Pharaohs ruled, and they debate even more when the Exodus happened. I've seen theories that range from Pepi II, ...


7

Good Friday is the traditional day of Jesus crucifixion. It takes place on the Friday afternoon before the Passover. Passover Timing The Passover was one of the most important holy days to the Jews. It is one of the Spring Feasts. But that doesn't really say enough. The Passover was the first feast of the year. The year was ordained to start at this ...


7

The Bible does not say on which day of the week Jesus was crucified. There are therefore three views of crucifixion day held currently: Wednesday, Thursday and Friday with Friday being the most commonly held view. Some Christians believe Wednesday was the day of Jesus crucifixion , and a few held the Thursday view. That said, beside United Church of ...


6

"Three Days and Three Nights" on amazingfacts.org (an SDA resource site) says being in the heart of the earth doesn't mean being dead in the grave, but rather being controlled by the world, so the three days and three nights began when the Son of Man was betrayed into the hands of sinners. The Heart of the Earth So the phrase “in the heart of the earth” ...


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