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Before reading this question, I had never heard of the term "demiurge," nor am I very familiar with philosophical terms, but I'm familiar with the Bible and the beliefs of Jehovah's Witnesses (since I am one), so I can answer based on the brief explanation given on Wikipedia of a Demiurge. Jehovah's Witnesses do not believe Jesus is a (co-)creator. Rather, ...


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In my research, Dyothelitism (union of the two wills from the two minds of the one Christ) is actually explained by Myaphisitism (union of the two natures, the natures did not become one. The nature were one i.e united/in unity). These two were succinctly the Hypostatic Union. Myaphisitism agrees with Chalcedon that the Lord Jesus Christ is consubstantial ...


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Miaphysitism is very similar to the Hypostatic Union. Miaphysitism (sometimes called henophysitism) is the Christology of the Oriental Orthodox Churches. Miaphysitism holds that in the one person of Jesus Christ, Divinity and Humanity are united in one "nature" ("physis"), the two being united without separation, without confusion, and without ...


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Questions like this one concerning the incarnation of God really stretch the limits of what we can comprehend. Over the centuries Christians came to settle on terms like "person" or "hypostasis" as the best ways they could think of to explain and reconcile the many truths taught by the scriptures, even though they can't do justice to the full reality of God. ...


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There is a complex Christological history behind this question. The common ground is that Jesus Christ is of two natures, divine and human. Christ's divine nature is uncreated and pre-existent, while his human nature is given through the Blessed Virgin Mary. This was then taken in two ways: The theologians of Antioch in Syria emphasized the completeness of ...


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