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One analogy I have heard goes something like this: The founder and owner of a large manufacturing firm, desiring to "stay in touch" with the operation of his plant, disguises himself as a newly hired and lowly line worker at his own company. There, without ever abdicating his ownership and ultimate sovereignty over the whole thing, he punches the ...


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Jesus “made himself nothing” (Philippians 2:7 NIV). When He came to earth “he gave up his divine privileges” (NLT). Jesus had to enter this world incognito, "his glory veiled". There were brief occasions when the disciples were enabled to glimpse that glory, as at his transfiguration. He veiled His glory, and He chose to occupy the position of a ...


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I came across this documentary called, "The Secret Family of Jesus", by a British Academic Theologian named Dr. Robert Beckford. Among the topics discussed was Christ's divinity in the eyes of those close to him (his siblings). Though not stated explicitly or openly, the Documentary argues that because due to certain vernacular and language not ...


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I don't have time for a long answer, but here are three passages that show that Jesus pre-existed eternally: Hebrews chapter 7 - draws an analogy to Melchizedek, who it says was without beginning of days or end of life (figuratively for Melchizedek; literally for Jesus--his birth into human flesh wasn't his beginning of days), and also calls Jesus' life ...


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John clearly and logically makes four statements : In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. The same was in the beginning with God. [John 1:1,2 KJV] 'In the beginning' states the moment of 'beginning'. If one existed at that moment, then that one has an existence that is independent of time. If independent of time, ...


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I have practically answered this question here with this argument: We can reformulate the question as: what is the Biblical basis for the Nicene interpretation of the Pre-existence of Christ doctrine? NT can be interpreted in a non-Trinitarian way, but the Nicene early church party interpreted NT according to the apostolic tradition, i.e. according to how ...


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Ancient Jewish culture had a concept of notional pre-existence. See Jesus’ Pre-Existence – Literal or Ideal? Something could exist in the mind of God (God's plan), and be talked about as existing but in a different sense from how we normally talk about existence - it exists or existed notionally. So, the question is if Jesus had notional pre-existence but ...


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The following are quotes from Bishops and apologists of the early church and a few were first or second generation disciples of the Apostles themselves. As such it is very easy to deduce that, not only did they have a large audience and impact, but they represent the teachings of the church at that time and of the Apostles themselves regarding the Deity of ...


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Outside of the New Testament canon itself, one of the earliest pieces of extra-Biblical evidence is the Alexamenos graffito. This shows a young man worshipping a donkey-headed figure on a cross. This likely comes from around 200AD. It seems most likely to me that worshipping of Jesus as God must have been widespread among Christians for there to be graffiti ...


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Earliest NT epistles (written circa A.D. 50-60) teaches Jesus is "not a man" (Gal 1:1, 1:11-12), but has "preexistence in the form of God and equality with God" (Phil 2:6) before/prior to "being born in the likeness of humans" (Phil 2:7) by being "born of a woman" (Gal 4:4). This incarnatoion is necessary because ...


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Iglesia ni Cristo (Church of Christ) has ~2.3 million adherents and is the 3rd largest religious group in the Philippines. "But we do not subscribe to the belief that Christ is a God-Man or both God and man. He is man in nature according to His own testimony (John 8:40) and the teachings of His Apostles (I Tim. 2:5; Matt. 1:18)." The Lord Jesus ...


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Caveat: this is a difficult sentence in general and there is no settled translation. However it's translated, it's easy to make a subtle assumption about the text that isn't actually there (although a straightforward inference coming from a trinitarian position). In the article Philippians 2:6-8 the authors conclude "The verse is not speaking either of ...


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Jehovah's Witnesses believe that only Jehovah God should be worshipped. It would not be appropriate to worship any of Jehovah's creations, including Jesus or the angels. (Luke 4:8) However, the matter is complicated by the fact that the Hebrew and Greek words that denote worship can also be applied to acts other than worship. This means that when translating ...


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The Biblical Unitarian view on this is fairly straightforward. Although Jesus can and ought to be worshipped as King, God is a larger ultimate object of worship. So the angel mentioned God and not Jesus. See Should we "worship" Jesus Christ? which lays out the issue of worship and Jesus from a Biblical Unitarian perspective.


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Will Christ at the second coming be made of flesh? Yes. This is what the Bible says: It is true that “the Word became flesh and dwelt among us” (John 1:14). The Word gave up the glory he had in heaven and became a little lower than the angels in order to do the will of his Father in heaven. But we see Jesus, who was made a little lower than the angels, ...


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Will Christ at the second coming be made of flesh? According to most Christian denominations the answer is yes. I assume that you are questioning whether Christ will appear at the Second Coming according to the flesh? To start of with, at the resurrection of Jesus, he rose from the dead, in body and soul! On one occasion, St. Thomas actually put his finger ...


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