21

No, the conclusions are not correct. The line of reasoning underlying this homily amounts to a conflation of metaphors. We are Christ This one is tolerably permissible. It's a truncation of "We are the body of Christ" (e.g "Now you are the body of Christ, and members of member." 1 Corinthians 12:27). This would have to be understood as ...


14

The "archangel" Michael is named in only three books in the Bible: in Daniel, Revelation, and Jude. While what Daniel and Revelation say about Michael is compatible with the idea that Michael is another name for Jesus, I cannot see how this can be the case for Jude: Jude 8-9 (NIV): In the very same way, on the strength of their dreams these ...


8

"God the Son" as the 2nd person of the Trinity The construct "God the Son" is the name for the 2nd person of the Trinity, referring to Jesus. The concept of Trinity itself grew in the early church father era after the last book of the New Testament was written, and therefore the construct doesn't appear in the NT. But since the bishops of the early church ...


7

Right expectation of reason & practical use of the Trinity Aquinas's 5 ways is like a lens for reason to apprehend God as much as we are allowed to see with our reason alone. The Chesterton's essay you mentioned is a great defense of Catholicism as a collective mind guarding the truth, which goes beyond reason to produce wisdom for believers, which he ...


7

No, of course Jehovah's Witnesses do not consider themselves to be polytheists. That is because they make sure they do not give any worship to Jesus Christ. It is strictly 'taboo' for any JW to pray to Jesus (as prayer is an act of worship), or to bow down on one's knees or to prostrate themselves in the name of Jesus (which is an act of worship). They speak ...


7

Original Answer You quote Wallace as follows: For a genitive in simple apposition the two nouns are equivalent to a convertible proposition. Thus, “Paul the apostle” could be unpacked as “Paul is the apostle” or “the apostle is Paul.” What Wallace is doing is making an argument from the Greek grammar. Your own logic is flawed because it takes his ...


6

Reluctance to identify Michael with Jesus may stem from the Biblical distinction between the Son and the angels. For this, see Hebrews 1-2, Colossians 1:15-20, Revelation 22:9, etc. Human beings are "lower" than the angels, the Son is "higher", and through the incarnation he "elevates" humans to a position of superiority over the angels (Hebrews 2:8, 1 ...


6

Do Jehovah’s Witnesses consider themselves to be polytheists? No, because they do not worship Jesus. They worship only Jehovah God. Jesus is not the Almighty God, but is merely “a god” who was created by Jehovah as a mighty spirit creature. He is divine but he is inferior to Jehovah God. Here is the official Jehovah’s Witness view from the February 2006 ...


6

There are several denominations who believe that Jesus is a created being. Jehovah’s Witnesses are probably the most vocal in their belief that Jesus, in his pre-mortal existence, was created by Jehovah God as the mighty spirit creature known in heaven as Michael the archangel. It was the spirit of Michael who entered into the child born to Mary and who ...


5

Although you specifically ask about the designation ‘First and Last’, there is a clear biblical link to that and the oft-concurrent designation ‘Alpha and Omega’, which is abundantly clear in the book of Revelation, and in JW literature. See https://www.jw.org/en/bible-teachings/questions/alpha-omega/ Who or What Is “the Alpha and the Omega”? “The Alpha ...


5

Calvin has this to say about Hebrews 5:9, using the word 'sanctified' for 'perfect' : Sanctified suits the passage better than "made perfect." The Greek word teleiotheis means both; but as he speaks here of the priesthood, he fitly and suitably mentions sanctification. And so Christ himself speaks in another place, "For their sakes I sanctify myself." (...


5

I would start with Deuteronomy 6:4-9 as the ground upon which to build your thesis Hear, O Israel: The LORD our God, the LORD is one. You shall love the LORD your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your might. And these words that I command you today shall be on your heart. You shall teach them diligently to your children, and shall ...


4

I was raised Catholic but no longer am in that tradition, if that qualifies me to answer. All I will offer though is the current understanding I hold regarding the Trinity which has, to this point, best satisfied the ravenous beast of my reason. I will also add that I did not come to faith in Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior because of reasoning this out ...


4

“Christian deist” is a contradiction in terms. Christians believe in the pre-incarnate existence of Jesus as the eternal and uncreated Word of God who was with God in the beginning and who is God. “The Word became flesh and dwelt with us” (John 1:1-3; 14). Deists reject any notion that Jesus pre-existed before he was born. Christians also believe in the ...


4

There is a complex Christological history behind this question. The common ground is that Jesus Christ is of two natures, divine and human. Christ's divine nature is uncreated and pre-existent, while his human nature is given through the Blessed Virgin Mary. This was then taken in two ways: The theologians of Antioch in Syria emphasized the completeness of ...


4

Warning: These are not my own beliefs, but I also don’t believe in straw-manning so this is only my best attempt to describe in their strongest form, what I might believe if were an Arian. I think the argument could be made that Arianism and semi-Arianism try to grapple with just these texts. Taking their cue from Colossians 1:15, Arians and semi-Arians ...


4

It's important to remember that the phrase "God the Son" is a man made theological construct coined with the intention of summarizing biblical truth much like the phrases "trinity", "vicarious atonement", or "plenary inspiration". The importance is not in the finding of these phrases within the canon of scripture but in determining how well they represent ...


4

It is true that very often Harmartia is used to mean sin or offence in the new testament. It could be exactly what Paul means in 2 Corinthians 5:21 as well, even though this has caused no small difficulty in understanding down through the centuries for individuals as much as for entire theologies. There are so many references to Jesus taking away sin, ...


3

The basis for my answer is founded on what I understand to be a fundamentally accepted belief by all Christians. I am mindful of what curiousdannii said here: Answers don't have to provide references or quotes to authoritative sources if they think it's common knowledge that denomination X teaches doctrine Y, but authors should be ready to provide them if ...


3

St. Paul is saying that Jesus is not "man" in the sense he here refers to: "a mere man." Rather, Jesus, "who, being in the form of God, deemed not equality with God robbery, but humbled himself, taking the form of a servant: being made in the likeness of men, and in habit also found as man." (Phil. 2:6-7) From (apo) means "apostle sent from" and by (dia) ...


3

Does original sin have an impact on Jesus? Like any coin worth it weight in gold, this question has two sides of an equation, just like a coin of great value. The question is both yes and no! Let me try to explain this. On one side of the coin, Jesus was conceived without original sin and as such was spared from all stain of sin inherited from Adam’s ...


3

The interpretation of the Old Testament in the New is an extremely complex subject and I recommend the book referenced in this summary article about the perspectives involved. However, there is significant support from Jewish sources for reading at least a some, but not all, of the Psalms as Messianic apart from the New Testament and according to Jewish (non-...


3

God the Son? To say the Father is God, is equal to saying "God the Father." In like manner, to say the "Son is God," is equal to saying "God the Son." Does the Bible use the exact words, "God the Father," yes. Does the Bible use the exact words, "God the Son," no. Does the Bible teach and clearly say that Jesus Christ is God, yes. John 1:1-14. At John 1:1, "...


3

Absolutely not. The "Logos/Word" eternally existed according to John 1:1-3. Moreover, both John 1:1 and Genesis 1:1 start out with the same three words, "in the beginning." The main thought of Genesis 1:1 is on "WHAT HAPPENED" in the beginning, and at John 1:1 the main thought or emphasis is on WHO EXISTED "in the beginning." Why do you think John 1:1 says ...


3

Question: Based on Hebrews 1:5 and 13 you ask how Jehovah's Witnesses can say that Jesus is the archangel Michael. You also ask, what is the distinction between the Son of God and the angels? In order to find an answer it is necessary to first understand what Jehovah’s Witnesses believe regarding the relationship between Jesus Christ, the Son of God, and ...


3

Jehovah’s Witnesses believe that the body of Jesus was disposed of by Jehovah God, dissolved into its constituent elements or atoms, and what came out of the tomb was a spirit creature. JESUS’ FLESHLEY BODY DISSOLVED: What happened to the perfect fleshly body of Jesus after his death? Was it preserved so that in time men will look upon it in worship? or ...


3

Is there any biblical basis for Churches in the West (Catholic, Orthodox, Anglican or Protestant) to depict Jesus as European or some other ethnic race? It seems to a certain point that men tend to maintain different depictions of Jesus, sometimes reflecting local racial characteristics, as do the Catholic and Orthodox depictions. As to whether there is any ...


3

The Definition produced by the Council of Chalcedon in 451 is an interesting text because it wasn't intended to stand alone; it was produced by people who knew well that they were part of a series of church councils stretching back over a century. So the Chalcedonian Definition endorses the 325 Nicene Creed, and it's 381 Constantinopolitan revision, as well ...


3

My understanding is that Divine nature and human nature cannot 'merge' but are united in the Person of Christ. The union is in his Person, not in an attribute : 'nature'. I assume that I would be referred to as a 'Chalcedonian'. From my own point of view, therefore, as a Chalcedonian, the situation is not reconcilible. The concept of Divine nature and human ...


3

The name Im·manʹu·el means "With Us Is God", and Jehovahs Witneses (JWs) believe that is the translation of that name it-1 pp. 1187-1189. Not necessarily everyone with that name is a god, but we also consider the meaning of the name to be true in the case of Jesus. Jesus is a God, but we do not consider him to be equal or the same as Jehovah or ...


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