13

As bradimus has indicated, this is a tricky issue, because projecting the modern debate of cessationism vs. continuationism onto church fathers is anachronistic. That said, some figures in the early church do talk about or infer a decline or end in at least some types supernatural occurrences, sometimes to what are often referred to as "spiritual gifts....


12

To make your syllogism more obvious for the Cessationists's argument, switch: "Satan or his demons" to "Elvis impersonators" "Godly version of X" to "Real Elvis singing 'Love Me Tender'" "deceitful version of X" to "Elvis impersonator singing 'Love Me Tender'" Adding the implied "today" ...


9

I have, a small handful of times, perceived in my mind what presented as vocalized words from God. Whether this came in through my ears I cannot say. Prior to God saving me through Jesus Christ there were other things that I similarly "heard" but I would not assign all of these the same source. Rather than a point of pride I consider it a ...


7

No. Just to be clear, I'm a Continuationist, but I think that argument is totally invalid. You can't derive anything about God from what Satan is doing, because the whole purpose of what Satan does is to lead people away from God. Sure, he can (and does) trick people by mimicking what God does, but he can also trick people by creating entirely new things ...


6

This is from an article in Tabletalk magazine, which is produced by Ligonier Ministries. It is written by Robert Rothwell and supposses to be the voice of Reformed Christianity on the topic of cessationism. There is much in the article describing the purpose of audible contact from the HS to the individual and why those purposes are expired. We ...


6

Apologies for the slightly sarcastic tone of this answer but I suppose the opinion of a Cessationist would lean towards sarcasm. The question in my mind is basically "What do doubters think about collections of stories that people can make?" (I personally never heard of these books). The simple answer is they are stories that the average doubter ...


6

The primary danger in studying the Bible in an overly erudite, scholarly, and academic way is the temptation to skip the all-important process of the application of Scripture to a lived life. All other dangers--apart from gross misinterpretation--pale by comparison. Not that every passage of Scripture is applicable to one's life. Far from it. In the final ...


6

There is nothing wrong with any person being erudite in any chosen field. Let's get that straight, at the outset, for to be erudite is to be able to teach or to write as a learned person who is fit to instruct and to train others. This means that you need to spell out what you mean by "overly erudite". Saying "overly academic" does not ...


5

Cessationists aren't atheists; of course God could perform powerful miraculous signs through his people today. Cessationists teach that even though God could do this, he doesn't as it is not part of his strategy and purpose for the church. Cessationists teach that miracles occur in distinct clusters in the Bible: Moses, the judges, Elijah and Elisha, Jesus ...


5

It is important to distinguish between cessation of spiritual gifts being bestowed on individuals, and cessation of all miraculous events entirely. Cessationists consider the first case (individual bestowment of spiritual gifts) to have ceased, but not all miraculous events entirely. See B. B. Warfield's Counterfeit Miracles, in the section titled Faith ...


5

The real focus here should not be on what Christians "believe", but what real spiritual people "experience". Unfortunately, as modern society has such a loose definition of what is "Christian", the real answer can only be addressed by a person who has actually "heard" from God. So as Stack Exchange has so generously ...


5

Do/which Christians believe they hear from God? Speaking in very general terms, most Christians denominations accept the possibility that God can speak to various individuals in one manner or another. It happens occasionally, here and there. It is true that some seem not to be able to hear the voice of God. But then He may be speaking to us in a way we are ...


5

It would first need to be established what Moses meant by the people prophesying in the wilderness, and then what Paul meant by Christians prophesying in the congregation. Then it would be necessary for modern-day proponents of those claiming the gift of prophesying to say what they mean by that. The question, as it stands, tries to blend all three into one ...


4

Churches associated with Reformed theology actually have a variety of views on the gifts of the spirit – many are in the "continuationist" camp. But among those that are cessationist, their views long precede Pentecostalism. The Westminster Confession of Faith, 1.1, like most varieties of cessationists, rejects the possibility of new Scripture: ...


4

Cessationists do not say that demonic possession has ceased. (Some events referred to by OP are claimed to be a manifestation of demonic possession.) Cessationists say that the gifts of tongues and miracles have ceased. Cessationists do not deny that the gifts of tongues and miracles can be mimicked. Cessationists do not deny that demonic possession can ...


4

Actually the majority of Protestant Evangelicals hold this view that you describe - the view that is in the middle. This is because the view that all the gifts have ceased is patently absurd at every level, and if this were true- then there could not be pastors. There is no mention anywhere that there is some special exception for pastors and evangelists. ...


4

There is no reference to tongues/healings/miracles in the pastoral epistles nor the later writings of John. References to Pentecost are about the utterance of foreign, earthly, languages. Then no mention of such things, generally, until about 1905. Then an explosion of claims during the past hundred years. This looks like a modern movement with no ...


4

Probably the most basic proof is that the Apostles, were directly chosen by God personally by a physical call when he was on earth, through a blinding appearance and voice and extraordinary power as he called Paul, or in the case of Matthias in a very odd yet still direct way. Secondly as in a more common sense way, as a special group was needed with ...


4

The prophets (inspired preachers) spoke to groups, for general attitudes and ideas, making them accountable to the gospel through Spirit inspired authority and conviction. In most old commentaries and theology there are two aspects of prophecy 'predicting the future' or 'declaring the mind of God' generally. Both when referring to them as a gift, to be a ...


3

1 Corinthians 14:1 reads : διωκετε την αγαπην ζηλουτε δε τα πνευματικα μαλλον δε ινα προφητευητε [TR undisputed] The word 'gifts' is not there in the Greek text and the KJV faithfully puts italics for the missing word which is a conjecture. Follow after charity, and desire spiritual gifts, but rather that ye may prophesy. [1 Corinthians 14:1 KJV] ... be ...


3

The purpose of sensational events is to distract from the gospel itself : the godly, sensible, sounding forth - by real preaching - of the truth of the gospel once delivered to the saints. The 'reality' is the gospel itself, not (supposedly real) sensational events. Therefore the argument, that the existence of sensational events (of any kind) pre-supposes ...


3

What kind of logically consistent epistemology can simultaneously consider (1) limited 2000-year-old testimonial evidence reliable and (2) abundant, recent and accessible testimonial evidence unreliable? Short answer It has never been about epistemology, but about authoritative interpretation of what the miracles mean. NT testimony of Jesus & Apostles's ...


3

Speaking as one who might be, myself, described as a 'Cessationist' I would say the question is attempting to deal with two very different things. A prophecy such as the Apocalypse, which definitively (and apostolically) describes end-times and the coming of Christ (and which is part of the canon of scripture) is one thing. A prophet (who is a member of a ...


3

Richard Gaffin, who provided the cessationist perspective in Are Miraculous Gifts for Today?, says in his book Perspectives on Pentecost (pg. 114) that individual endowments of healing were "foundational gifts" which have "passed out of the life of the church." But he says more: At the same time, however, the sovereign will and power of ...


3

The principle of ex falso quodlibet applies here: as a false premise can be used to "prove" anything, if the premise of the argument is shown to be invalid, the entire argument falls. So let's examine the premises point-by-point: P1: God only gives special revelations to His servants/apostles with the purpose of revealing information that is ...


3

For a list of which gifts have generally ceased one would have to turn to a Cessationist. The only work I know that thoroughly delves into all the gifts and offices and delineates what he considers obviously ceased and which ones are not, is John Owen. He basically considers any first century office not normal in all churches in history as temporary for the ...


3

Most Cessationists that I know of of have a more nuanced understanding. They believe Jesus is speaking generally about unbelievers who think they have performed miracles but also may include an unbeliever who was in a ministry that actually may have performed real ones, such as Judas. For the fake miracles - these are to be expected and I suppose even many ...


3

No, they don't wish all God's people to prophesy. But Cessationist Christians appreciate prophecies as much as Moses and Paul since they appreciate hearing the authentic voice of God expressed in the prophetic books of the Bible. Just because they don't expect modern day prophets doesn't make them appreciate prophecies less. They just have a different ...


2

Tom Pennington provides a variety of arguments on this here. There are three arguments I found particularly compelling: The purpose of miracles is, biblically, to establish credibility for a spokesman who gives new revelation from God. Few charismatics today claim that they are giving new, infallible, divine revelation from God. But if they aren't, then it'...


2

What is the basis for Cessationism? The supernatural gifts of the Holy Spirit were first observed at Pentecost; Acts 2:16-18 But this is that which was spoken by the prophet Joel; And it shall come to pass in the last days, saith God, I will pour out of my Spirit upon all flesh: and your sons and your daughters shall prophesy, and your young men shall ...


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