18

That is because Jesus gave Peter the keys to heaven and earth (Matthew 16:19). Not keys to hell. In other words, Peter (and his successors) can bind and loose on earth and heaven (Matthew 18:18) not in hell. They do not have authority on beings outside of the church. And people in hell are outside of the Church. P.S: Christ alone has the keys to hell (...


9

The Catholic Church honors the Apostle St Paul as a Pillar of the Church and as a martyr. The Church celebrates two major events in the life of the Apostle. On January 25, Catholics celebrate the Conversion of St Paul. The martyrdoms of both Saints Peter and Paul is commemorated on the Feast of Saints Peter and Paul, June 29. The moment that changed the ...


6

Veneration of martyrs (such as Saint Stephen) as Saints among the Christian faithful long predated the formal process (to include miracles) which later became a standard and evolved into canonization. Martyrs were prominent among the early saints venerated by Christians. Among other things, persecution sparked the devotion of the saints, facilitated ...


6

Yes, Louis (1823-1894) & Zélie Martin (1831-1877), parents of St. Thérèse of Lisieux, were jointly canonized in October 2015.


5

Saint Seraphim of Sarov (1754-1833) seems to fit the bill here. Saint Seraphim of Sarov (Russian: Серафим Саровский) (1 August [O.S. 19 July] 1754 (or 1759) – 14 January [O.S. 2 January] 1833), born Prokhor Moshnin (Прохор Мошнин), is one of the most renowned Russian monks and mystics in the Eastern Orthodox Church. He is generally considered the greatest ...


5

Canonization does not change an individual's status in the eyes of God—nothing can change that. What it does is make a declaration about what the Church thinks of them: By canonizing some of the faithful, i.e., by solemnly proclaiming that they practiced heroic virtue and lived in fidelity to God's grace, the Church recognizes the power of the Spirit of ...


5

Yes. Miracles for beatification or canonisation do not have to be medical. The Congregation for the Causes of Saints, the Vatican investigative body, only retain, on a general basis, medical experts, but can consult other technical expertise, as well as medical specialists, when needed. Another stage in the process of validating a miracle is considering ...


5

The short answer is no. Not every saint is expected to have an incorruptible corpse. Although incorruptibility is recognized as supernatural, it is no longer counted as a miracle in the recognition of a saint (The Incorruptibles). Embalmed bodies were not recognized as incorruptibles. For example, although the body of Pope John XXIII remained in a ...


5

There are two additional reasons for More's canonization. The first reason is that the Vatican wished to support English Roman Catholics over against the Church of England. Anglican-RC relations at this time were very frosty; and because More had defended papal (as against royal) supremacy in the church, and died for his conviction, he qualified as a martyr. ...


5

No, such a thing would not be possible. The Pope cannot unilaterally canonize anyone. That would completely miss the point of declaring someone a saint, which is to present their lives as a public example of heroic virtue for Catholics to imitate. By canonizing some of the faithful, i.e., by solemnly proclaiming that they practiced heroic virtue and ...


5

Saint Stephen was the first martyr, at whose stoning Saul/Paul was present. He doesn't get the honour of "first saint". The rules have almost certainly changed since antiquity, and are now fairly rigid (two miracles are required, at least).


4

The catholic church, especially through JPII and Pope Francis, stress that there are many saints, even the "regular" saints. Catholic church recognizes, in this way, only a tiny fraction of the saints. Saints are witnesses to the faith, to the truth. This world badly needs it, so the answer to this, is to "expose" more of those witnesses of faith. It is ...


4

St Stephen is considered a saint and a martyr in many Christian denominations. Because St Stephen is the very first martyr of the newly founded Church of Jesus Christ, he is given the title of Protomartyr or first martyr of the Early Church. Many consider the first Saint of the Early Church to be the Thief on the Cross after all did not Jesus himself ...


4

Only one other antipope than Hippolytus of Rome is considered a saint in the Catholic Church. The antipope Felix II has been given the status of a saint in the Roman Martyrology with a feast day of July 29. According to the "Liber Pontificalis", which may be registering here a reliable tradition, Felix built a church on the via Aurelia. It is well known ...


3

The process, if one can term it that, by which Orthodox recognize certain people as "saints" is radically different from the practice followed in the Roman Catholic Church. Recognition of saints among the Orthodox begins first with the local faithful who recognize that person who has reposed as someone who had cooperated with God's grace to the extent that ...


3

St. Rita of Cascia: Saint of the Impossible: Wife, Mother, Widow, Nun (1381-1457) by Joseph Sicardo, O.S.A., ch. 30: On the 27th of April, in the year 1652, a house belonging to Signora Clara Calderini, wife of Giovanni Polidoro, a resident of Narni, took fire accidentally. Owing to the scarcity of water, all hope of saving the building was abandoned. The ...


3

Canonization, beatification, etc., do not change one's merit. Fr. John Hardon, S.J., defines "merit" in his Catholic Dictionary: Divine reward for the practice of virtue. It is a Catholic doctrine that by his good works a person in the state of grace really acquires a claim to supernatural reward from God. "The reward given for good works is not ...


3

We can use the word "saint" to mean "one who is canonized by the Catholic Church," or only "one who is either in Heaven or Purgatory," or "one whose salvation is not in doubt anymore." If you mean "first saint" as in "first canonized," or "first recognized as a saint," I'm afraid I don't know. However, if instead, you mean "the first, chronologically, to ...


3

Fergusson doesn't appear to understand Catholic mariology. Mary is not a "feminine expression of deity"; she is not a feminine aspect of God; she is not God, as Protestants often blasphemously allege Catholics believe. Although St. Gertrude the Great was not canonized, that doesn't mean this holy Benedictine is not a saint. Her feast was celebrated ...


3

St. John Vianney was not the first "parish priest" to be raised to the altars. I am sure that one can find several with time permitting, especially in groups of martyrs. St. Ivo of Kermartin (1253-1303) was also a parish priest. Ivo Helory, a legal scholar from Kermartin, France, served as an ecclesiastical judge in the dioceses of Rennes and Treguier, ...


3

Has Peter Lombard ever been venerated in the Catholic Church? Has Peter Lombard ever been officially been given the title of venerable, as in the second step towards being canonized as a saint in the Catholic Church, the simple answer is no. There seems to be no formal documentation to support the fact that he was venerated as such. One of the biggest ...


3

Yes, by the: Ethiopian Church with a feast day on June 19 Coptic Church with a feast day of June 25 Why? The above churches believed that Pilate became Christian, was baptized, and even tried to save St. Stephen from being executed, and built a church in honor of Stephen. Source: Wikipedia on Pontius Pilate See also: Pontius Pilate, a saint?


2

But wait, is it not that Atheists and Agnostics are going to hell? Why not declare them, once dead, officially members of Hell? (a self-made rethoric question just to bring up two more reasons) No, for two reasons: Declaring someone to be in Hell is equivalent to say that God's forgiveness was not sufficient enough to save that person. It is clear that ...


2

The Popes as successors of St. Peter hold the keys to bind and loosen things on earth as well as in heaven (Matthew 16:19 and 18:18). The Popes have not even pronounced on the question as to the demise of the apostle Judas Iscariot and we all know the grave words that Jesus spoke about him shortly before the Passion: "Better for this man that he had never ...


2

There is no one unique answer to this question. The Saints are given to the Church so that the many may have examples to follow. In addition to this, the number of martyrs beatified and/or canonized by Pope John Paul II is staggering. The first saints of the Early Church were all martyrs. Martyrdom was an exceptional way of being united to Jesus on the ...


2

The opinion on this issue seems to be divided. According to the Catholic Encyclopedia, at least by the beginning of the XX century (i.e. pre Second Vatican Council) "most of" theologians thought canonisation involved an infallible claim. This is partly based on St. Thomas Aquinas's view: "Since the honour we pay the saints is in a certain ...


2

Blessed Pope John Paul II of happy memory changed the process of beatification and canonization dramatically. Pope John Paul II changed this process dramatically. First, he put the responsibility for gathering evidence into the sole hands of the local bishop. More importantly, he abolished the entire legal system that had grown up around the canonization ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible