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In Matthew 13, Jesus reveals that it is God's will that some people understand and others be confused: 11 He replied, “Because the knowledge of the secrets of the kingdom of heaven has been given to you, but not to them. 12 Whoever has will be given more, and they will have an abundance. Whoever does not have, even what they have will be taken from them. 13 ...


7

Why God allows ambiguities and what He does to help us Most denominations hold that the Holy Spirit inspires not only the Biblical book authors but also the Individual Bible reader, and/or the Church Councils (producing canon, creeds, documents), and/or the Church teaching authority (such as the Catholic magisterium, producing guidelines) so that ...


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The strongest, if not the only, argument is prophecy fulfilled. Prophecy is a prediction, a forth-telling of something to happen in the future. Matthew's book alone, for example, lists about 27 fulfilled prophecies from the Old Testament about Jesus Christ's fulfillments. This site asserts there's been about 2,000 of 2,500 prophecies already fulfilled. This ...


4

One part might be that God wants to reveal hearts. A determined critic can always find a creative way to misunderstand. In politics for instance, it's surprising how creative people can be at misrepresenting, spinning, and "misunderstanding" something. God could have spent an inordinate amount of space in His Word trying to "correct" ...


4

Others cited fulfilled prophecy, which I will not dispute, as it has provided a significant boost to my faith at times when I needed it. However, it was another supernatural feature of the Bible that even more powerfully touched my life as new Christian. If a person learns a new truth and understands it with their mind, it can help them. Mathematics helps ...


3

I'll offer a survey of 6 arguments I have seen used to establish that the Bible is inspired. Subsequent to this, I'll offer my own evaluation of the merit of these arguments--if you'd like to derive your own conclusions, skip the "Evaluation" part of this post. 6 Arguments 1. Archeology Many defend the Bible on the basis that so many of its ...


3

The Best Answer was chosen before I read this question (within 24 hours of it being posted) and, having read all the answers, I wish to point out that the scriptures of the Bible tell us exactly why many parts seem ambiguous (and thus why no end of different interpretations are made.) There is no need to go seeking Christian philosophers, theologians, or ...


3

The Christian group called Swedenborgian, which also now goes by the name of The New Church, rejects Paul’s writings. Many New Thought era (1860 to 1920) founded sects can be considered anti-Paulist to one degree or another: Unity, Unitarian, Christian Science, Science of Mind, Church of Divine Science, and perhaps a couple more. There are communities to be ...


2

If we can agree that such confusions and contentions are undesirable, as Ephesians chapter 4 strongly suggests, then the question of why God would allow it simply reduces to the old question of The Problem of Evil. The most common answer given by various Christian denominations is that God considers free will paramount; that without the ability to make wrong ...


2

Do Messianic Jews accept the entire New Testament as a base of their belief? Yes. The Holy Bible is the main religious text for Messianic Jews. They follow the teachings of the Torah (Old Testament) while also holding the New Covenant (New Testament) as God’s Truth. They believe Old Testament prophesies about the coming Messiah were fulfilled in the New ...


2

I’m trying to compile the History of the Bible, at least the Christian recognition of what was inspired and what wasn’t in the Old Testament. Best way to see what Christians recognized as inspired and what wasn't is to let them speak for themselves. Let's review what the early church quoted as inspired scripture. ~80 AD: Clement of Rome Quotes from Book of ...


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The earliest Old Testament canon is mentioned by Josephus circa 95CE, as well as the reason why they considered it "from God". From there, it's history is shown by Melito of Sardis circa 175CE. These earliest canons never included what came to be called the apocrypha. Josephus Although he does not name specific books, it is quite clear to which ...


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I have not found any Christian denominations that reject the 66 books of the Protestant Bible -- it would be particularly difficult to claim to be a Christian without some teachings of Christ to go with it -- but there are individual Christians and groups of Christians who reject much of the Bible. I'm not referring to people who reject all but one Biblical ...


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The best answer to this is that where there are ambiguities--true ambiguities--the answer to the burning question is not necessary for us to know. The doctrinal disagreements are generally based on doctrines which are clear in Scripture, but which are interpreted in false ways by many. The Bible says nothing of anything being God-breathed (inspired) except ...


1

I strongly doubt there's been any of them around for >1500 years, but the 2nd century Marcionites fit the bill (source for quotation): [Marcion's] canon consisted of two divisions: the Gospel, containing an abbreviated copy of Luke, and the Apostolicon, containing ten Epistles of Paul As to the justification: The main points of Marcion's teaching were ...


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