17

Yes, the Catechism and Canon Law are two separate things The Catechism is a teaching tool for the bishops and various catechists to instruct the faithful. (Why do we receive the Eucharist? What makes Easter so special?) The first Catechism worthy of the name came out of the Council of Trent (1545 - 1563). The more recent one, linked to on-line with some ...


17

No. Canon 844 says: Catholic ministers administer the sacraments licitly to Catholic members of the Christian faithful alone, who likewise receive them licitly from Catholic ministers alone. So Catholics may receive sacraments licitly from Catholic ministers alone. There are exceptions. In the case of Communion Whenever necessity requires it or ...


16

In an emergency where there is danger of imminent death, anyone (yes, anyone) who has the appropriate intention can baptize, by using the Trinitarian baptismal formula. In all other cases, Catholics are instructed to contact their parish. (Note that this only concerns who can baptize: not all persons should be baptized. There are certain restrictions ...


16

Perhaps surprisingly, Canon Law appears to allow it. Can. 959 In the sacrament of penance the faithful who confess their sins to a legitimate minister, are sorry for them, and intend to reform themselves obtain from God through the absolution imparted by the same minister forgiveness for the sins they have committed after baptism and, at the same, time ...


15

TR;DR So long as the persons have not rendered themselves impotent, there is nothing preventing two transgender persons from marrying one another. However, the Church essentially recognizes only the so-called biological sex of the persons. Hence, she would regard the transgender “man” as a woman, and the transgender “woman” as a man. In general, the ...


13

What a “dispensation” is First of all, a “dispensation” is a legal term, in which the competent authority relieves one of its subjects from having to follow a law (or part of a law) in a particular case. The Code of Canon Law describes dispensations as follows: A dispensation, or the relaxation of a merely ecclesiastical law in a particular case, can be ...


12

The Roman Church does recognise marriages outside the Church. See Canons 1055 and 1056: Can. 1055 §1. The matrimonial covenant, by which a man and a woman establish between themselves a partnership of the whole of life and which is ordered by its nature to the good of the spouses and the procreation and education of offspring, has been raised by Christ ...


12

The Catechism of the Catholic Church is a book, promulgated in 1992 by Pope St. John Paul II, which seeks to explain the doctrine (that is, the body of teachings) that the Catholic Church holds. It was envisioned as a document which the faithful can turn to if they are in doubt whether the Church teaches something, and whether Catholics must therefore ...


11

In the Catholic Church, laicization (sometimes called “defrocking”) of a priest is much more complicated and is imposed as a penalty much less frequently than, say, the removal of a minister in other denominations. That is because the Catholic Church has a properly sacramental understanding of the priesthood. According to Catholic teaching, once a man is ...


11

There is no prohibition of it in Canon Law. St. Thomas Aquinas, in Summa Theologica II-II q. 32 a. 7 ("Whether one may give alms out of ill-gotten goods?"), mentions three ways in which money may be "ill-gotten" (illicite acquisitis), the last being not because the taking was unlawful, but because it is the outcome of something unlawful, as in the case ...


10

A married person cannot be elected, because the pope is Bishop of Rome and married people cannot be bishops. Can 1042: The following are simply impeded from receiving orders: a man who has a wife, unless he is legitimately destined to the permanent diaconate; Canon law does allow married men to become deacons (as stated there), and also ...


9

The illicitness and the validity of Sacraments are canonical terms used to describe the effectiveness of the sacrament. Illicit means, roughly, “illegal”. In the case of a Sacrament, it means performed in a way that is not permitted by the rules or laws of the Church. (But the sacrament did happen). The term Illicit can also be used to refer to actions not ...


9

The Roman Ritual prescribes 24. An infant of infidel parents may be baptized lawfully even though the parents are opposed, provided that its life is in such danger that one can reasonably foresee it may die before attaining the use of reason. Outside the case of danger of death, it may lawfully be baptized, provided its Catholic rearing is ...


9

I believe I have the confirmation letter stating that I left the church.... This is a serious issue. From what you say, I am assuming that you have formally defected from the Catholic Church. By law, this act would have been entered in your baptismal register.Actus formalis defectionis ab Ecclesia catholica If this is true, then just going to confession ...


8

Pope John Paul II abolished the Promotor fidei (Promoter of the Faith) office, better known as Advocatus diaboli (Devil's advocate) in 1983 No, he did not abolish this office. There is still one Promoter of the Faith for every cause of canonization. What Pope John Paul II did was to reduce his power to a great extent and change his role in the process of ...


8

I am a priest who deals mostly with children. At schools, camps, and youth events we have penance services or just plain opportunities for confession. Quite a few non-catholics often come to confession. First, it is unlikely that any of the young people who come have done anything serious. It is mostly the usual childhood faults. If it becomes obvious that ...


8

You can certainly re-join the Catholic Church. Your baptismal record should not have been wiped out; I believe parishes are required to keep records of all baptisms that were ever performed there. I wouldn't be surprised if the same goes for confirmations, but I'm not sure. To the best of my knowledge, all you need to do is to go to confession, confess ...


8

Fr. William P. Saunders of Catholic Straight Answers gives the following reasons for fasting before Communion: The most important point regarding this question concerns why we ought to [ever] fast. St. Paul reminds us, "Continually we carry about in our bodies the dying of Jesus, so that in our bodies the life of Jesus may also be revealed" (II Cor 4:10). ...


8

The Catechism says this about Gambling. 2413 Games of chance (card games, etc.) or wagers are not in themselves contrary to justice. They become morally unacceptable when they deprive someone of what is necessary to provide for his needs and those of others. The passion for gambling risks becoming an enslavement. Unfair wagers and cheating at games ...


8

The USCCB website has several questions and answers about Lenten observances. The last one of these is: Q. Are there exemptions other than for age from the requirement to fast on Ash Wednesday and Good Friday? A. Those that are excused from fast and abstinence outside the age limits include the physically or mentally ill including individuals ...


8

There is no such thing as voluntary excommunication, in the strict sense of excommunication. There's a good answer by AthanasiusOfAlex which explains the purpose of excommunication; I'll restrict this answer to method, as asked by the question. However, the other answer is valuable in demonstrating that "voluntary excommunication" is absurd. Excommunication ...


7

Although it is true that any Catholic can become Pope they are typically chosen from higher level clergy such as a cardinal. These men are very likely not married because the Canon prohibits it unless the Pope allows it for his particular case. The catechism says this concerning marriage for the clergy: 1579 All the ordained ministers of the Latin Church,...


7

It generally means 'automatic excommunication'. Most people conceive of excommunication as something that happens to people, rather than something they do to themselves. That form of excommunication indeed happens (it recently happened when the Pope excommunicated an Australian priest), but is relatively rare. You cannot expect the Pope or the church to look ...


7

Code of Canon Law states: 766.0 Lay persons can be permitted to preach in a church or oratory, if necessity requires it in certain circumstances or it seems advantageous in particular cases, according to the prescripts of the conference of bishops and without prejudice to 767.1 767.1. Among the forms of preaching, the homily, which is part of the ...


7

There are only three mentions of the word impotence in the Code of Canon Law: 1) In Canon 1084, section 1. This is the impediment which you mention: Antecedent and perpetual impotence to have intercourse, whether on the part of the man or the woman, whether absolute or relative, nullifies marriage by its very nature. 2) In Canon 1084, section 2. This ...


7

Canon 1141 would appear to be relevant: A marriage that is ratum et consummatum can be dissolved by no human power and by no cause, except death. So, no, a consummated marriage cannot be ended simply because impotence has developed. The marriage existed, is known to have existed in its consummation, and annulment is tantamount to saying that it never ...


7

Disclaimer: Though I am a Catholic, I am not a canon lawyer, nor a theologian, nor a priest. I am reasonably certain that my answer is correct and in accordance with Church law; but if I am in error I will gladly receive correction. Unfortunately, it appears that such a couple as you describe is not eligible to be godparents at a Catholic baptism. The Code ...


7

The Church believes that it is important for a baptizand (in this context also called the catechumen) to have a sponsor, for a couple of reasons. The Church considers the newly baptized to be part of the community, and the community takes part in their post-baptism catechesis. The sponsors are there at least partly to represent the community's part in the ...


7

Church law does not explicitly prohibit revealing that a given person has been to confession or not. Here are the relevant canons from the Code of Canon Law: Can. 983 §1. The sacramental seal is inviolable; therefore it is absolutely forbidden for a confessor to betray in any way a penitent in words or in any manner and for any reason. §2. The ...


6

According to the 1983 Code of Canon Law, mixed marriages (where one party is non-Catholic) require permission from the "local ordinary" or bishop (Can. 1124). The children must be baptized and raised Catholic, and the non-Catholic has to be okay with this (Can. 1125). They must have a Catholic wedding and cannot "have another religious celebration of the ...


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