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Believer's baptism (aka. credo-baptism) was revived by the Anabaptists on January 21, 1525, when Conrad Grebel baptized George Blaurock. These Anabaptists believed that only believer's baptism was legitimate and effective. There is no agreement on when believer's baptism ceased to be practiced in early Christianity. It continued to be widespread through at ...


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According to Alexandre Ganoczy's Calvin’s Life and Context, chapter 1 in The Cambridge Companion to John Calvin there is no scholarly consensus as to the extent of Calvin's involvement in Nicolas Cop's speech "made on the Feast of All Saints in 1533 at the opening of the academic year": Who was behind this speech? Scholarly opinions differ. Some attribute ...


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This is from Calvin's treatment of Psalm 56:3. The most common translation of this work, by James Anderson (published 1846), is available online for free, and the relevant section reads: The true proof of faith consists in this, that when we feel the solicitations of natural fear, we can resist them, and prevent them from obtaining an undue ascendancy. ...


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I found a compilation of John Calvin quotes on the topic of God's love. Here is one that struck me as relevant to your question: Sermon #28, Deut. 4.36-38, p. 167, this quote was compiled by Andrew Myers. It is true that Saint John says generally, that [God] loved the world. And why? For Jesus Christ offers Himself generally to all men without ...


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Yes Luther denied we had the ability to choose to respond affirmatively to the Gospel and so save ourselves. He held that it was only through God's intervention that we could be saved. God had to convert a person through the Word, by means of the Holy Spirit changing our hearts and leading us to embrace Christ as our Saviour, in order for us to be saved. ...


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