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My study bible (The NIV Study Bible by Zondervan) notes that it was a common ancient practice to "telescope" a genealogy -- i.e. to skip over generations when building the list. In the introduction to 1 Chronicles (where you'll also find a number of "missing" generations in its numerous genealogies), it states: The most common type of fluidity in ...


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St. Thomas Aquinas gives this precise objection in his question on "Whether it is lawful to kill oneself?" (Summa Theologica II-II q. 64 a. 5 arg 4): Samson killed himself, as related in Judges 16:30, and yet he is numbered among the saints (Heb. 11:32). Therefore it is lawful for a man to kill himself. To which he replies (ibid. ad 4): As Augustine ...


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The book of Judges, in both 17:6 and 21:25 explains why society was so different at that time of Israel's history: In those days there was no king in Israel, but every man did that which was right in his own eyes. This book describes a period when people had lost the laws that Moses had delivered to them, and had set up their own society run by judges. ...


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I'm with JDM-GBG and yourself: the genealogy here is telescoped, i.e. generations have been omitted, and this is common practice in the Scriptures. Rather than repeat the work of Dr John Millam I will just refer you to his online article "The Genesis Genealogies - are they complete?" which looks at many genealogies in Scripture. An especially interesting ...


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