14

Ehud was a Benjamite and the phrase translated "left handed man" is a very interesting Hebrew idiom. It literally reads "a man bound/restricted in his right hand." The same phrase is used in Judges 20:16 to describe 700 slingers (also of the tribe of Benjamin). These two verses are the only places where this idiom is used. Judges 20:16 Among all this ...


10

God's plan had very little to do with the tactics employed. Indeed, God's purpose in downsizing Gideon's army was specifically to de-emphasize the role of man in the conflict. To wit, Judges 7:2 states: The Lord said to Gideon, “The people with you are too many for me to give the Midianites into their hand, lest Israel boast over me, saying, ‘My own ...


10

This is an odd passage, since, as you noted, he would certainly have known his household. Also, the Law of Moses strictly forbade human sacrifice, particularly the sacrifice of one's own children, categorizing it as an abomination before the Lord, so such an offering would never have been acceptable to God anyway. It's interesting to note that the mourning ...


8

Jewish and Christian scholars alike present many opinions and interpretations of the story of Jephthah and his daughter. The ambiguity of the text and the fact that her sacrifice is not described in detail have led to much debate. Some believe that she was literally sacrificed; some maintain that she was dedicated as a living sacrifice to God. Some ...


7

וַיְהִי יְהוָה אֶתּ־יְהוּדָה And the LORD was with Judah וַיֹרֶשׁ אֶת־הָהָר and he took possession of the hill [country] ...כִּ֣י לֹא לְהוֹרִישׁ אֶת־יֹשְׁבֵי הָעֵמֶק but he could not drive out those living in the valley... The pronoun "he" in the final line is of interest. In fact, the Hebrew has no pronoun, nor does it have a form of "could". ...


5

Justin Martyr is probably the strongest early advocate for the view that the "Angel of the Lord" in the OT often refers to Christ. In his Dialogue with Trypho, he argues that many supernatural appearances in the OT are manifestations of the second member of the Trinity. One such example is that of the burning bush in Exodus 3:2-4, where reference to the "...


5

The short answer: no, Paine's opinion is not widely accepted. First of all, Thomas Paine's opinions on Christianity should be taken with a few grains of salt. He was not a particularly religious person: I do not believe in the creed professed by the Jewish church, by the Roman church, by the Greek church, by the Turkish church, by the Protestant church, ...


5

As you correctly pointed out, it would have been against God's will for Jephthah to sacrifice his daughter. (Deuteronomy 12:31) Yet the account shows that God approved of his vow. This is seen in that God’s spirit was acting upon Jephthah when he made his vow. (Judges 11:29) Right after Jephthah made the vow, God blessed his endeavor. (Judges 11:32) The ...


5

To me the most convincing argument against Jephthah putting her daughter to death is the fact that she lamented her virginity, not an imminent death. Jephthah may have had an opportunity to redeem his daughter as per the rules laid out in Leviticus 27. But he didn't do it, making him essentially respect the vow even while it wasn't easy. There's an entire ...


4

My study bible (The NIV Study Bible by Zondervan) notes that it was a common ancient practice to "telescope" a genealogy -- i.e. to skip over generations when building the list. In the introduction to 1 Chronicles (where you'll also find a number of "missing" generations in its numerous genealogies), it states: The most common type of fluidity in ...


4

St. Thomas Aquinas gives this precise objection in his question on "Whether it is lawful to kill oneself?" (Summa Theologica II-II q. 64 a. 5 arg 4): Samson killed himself, as related in Judges 16:30, and yet he is numbered among the saints (Heb. 11:32). Therefore it is lawful for a man to kill himself. To which he replies (ibid. ad 4): As Augustine ...


4

Not being able to read God's mind I cannot answer your question as to what his plan was, but I will tell you why I believe he did it. God told the Israelites that if they would serve him he would give them the ability to overcome 100 to 1 odds. Lev 26:7 through 9 KJV 7 And ye shall chase your enemies, and they shall fall before you by the sword. ...


4

I believe the English Expositor Adam Clarke clarifies this matter: [And the Lord was with Judah, and he drave out the inhabitants of the mountain; but could not drive out the inhabitants of the valley, because they had chariots of iron.] "Strange! were the iron chariots too strong for Omnipotence? The whole of this verse is improperly rendered. The ...


3

The emphasis is on the fact that he used his left-handedness to trick Eglon. The narrative is highlighting the intelligence or wisdom involved in this trick and is not accusing him of cowardice. In fact, the narrator clearly views God as behind this, and sees the wisdom involved in this maneuver as being on God's part, in choosing to use a left-handed man as ...


3

I don't have a specifically Catholic perspective but by the time of the events in the book of Joshua, the physical people Judah, Simeon, and the other 10 patriarchs that the tribes of Israel were named after were long dead. Here's what's going on: The 12 tribes of Israel were named after the sons of Jacob (their births in Genesis 30). One of those sons, ...


2

According to other scholars the "and" can be translated "or" as well. So he promised to dedicate "whstever" came out the door OR if it wasnt a person the make burnt offering... which is also a dedication.


2

Folk songs are about the context as much as the text. Bruce Jackson writes in the introduction to his book Wake Up Dead Man: Hard Labor and Southern Blues: There is an important difference in our approach to art song and folk song. Art song requires that we perceive the nature of the art involved; folk song requires not only perception of the art but ...


2

I would tell you, but I have not the time: Hebrews 11:32-38 What more shall I say? I have not time to tell of Gideon, Barak, Samson, Jephthah, of David and Samuel and the prophets, who by faith conquered kingdoms, did what was righteous, obtained the promises; they closed the mouths of lions, put out raging fires, escaped the devouring sword; out of ...


2

in early books of the bible, the ephod was a special piece of clothing that was made for Aaron the High priest to wear when he served the Lord (Exodus 28:5) “They shall take the gold, blue, purple, and scarlet thread, and the fine linen, 6 and they shall make the ephod of gold, blue, purple, and scarlet thread, and fine woven linen, artistically worked. 7 ...


2

The book of Judges, in both 17:6 and 21:25 explains why society was so different at that time of Israel's history: In those days there was no king in Israel, but every man did that which was right in his own eyes. This book describes a period when people had lost the laws that Moses had delivered to them, and had set up their own society run by judges. ...


1

I'm with JDM-GBG and yourself: the genealogy here is telescoped, i.e. generations have been omitted, and this is common practice in the Scriptures. Rather than repeat the work of Dr John Millam I will just refer you to his online article "The Genesis Genealogies - are they complete?" which looks at many genealogies in Scripture. An especially interesting ...


1

God promised to drive out these nations completely on condition; Deutronomy 11; 22 "For if you are careful to keep all this commandment which I am commanding you to do, to love the LORD your God, to walk in all His ways and hold fast to Him, 23 then the LORD will drive out all these nations from before you, and you will dispossess nations greater and ...


1

The Significance of his being left handed is not that being left handed is an important message. It is significant because it shows the utter deception in the assassination. Throughout History emptying the right hand and presenting it to show that it has no weapon, has been a sign that they come in peace, with no ill intent. That signal is still in use ...


1

The answer is NO, he did not literally kill her and use her for the burnt offering. It is figurative use of language. She bewailed her virginity for two months and she knew no man after that. There is no human sacrifice. It is sometimes best to not read into the text something that is not there. Using the bible only you cannot gather that he ...


1

There are numerous tantalising fragments in the Old Testament referring to traditions of human sacrifice by the early Hebrews. Mark S. Smith examines the biblical record in The Early History of God and says that child sacrifice was Judean practice as late as the seventh century BCE. He says that the denials in Jereremiah 7:31; 19:5 and 32:35 that human ...


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