10

To bless is related to to consecrate. Both imply an act of recognizing and/or declaring and devoting something to have a particular purpose or holiness. If a father blesses his son's decision in a matter, we mean that the father supports and acknowledges the decision. If a priest blesses a marriage, he declares, with the approval of the whole Church in the ...


10

It is a good when a new person comes into existence; God still creates a rational soul out of nothing even for those conceived as a result of sin. But it is never moral to use evil means in the case of IVF: depriving a child of his or her right to be conceived in an act of marital love masturbation to obtain semen killing many people by subjecting them to ...


7

This is an ancient custom which predates Christianity. Pliny (Natural History 28.5) records a custom among the Romans of greeting someone who sneezes: Why is it that we salute a person when he sneezes, an observance which Tiberius Caesar, they say, the most unsociable of men, as we all know, used to exact, when riding in his chariot even? Some there are, ...


6

TL; DR - essentially, it is a method of praising God and bringing him glory. This article addresses the very issue: There are two main things that we do when we bless the Lord. The first is synonymous with giving thanks and praise. Some translations actually say, “Give thanks to the Lord,” where others say, “Bless the Lord.” So, blessing the Lord is ...


6

Blessing expresses the basic movement of Christian prayer: it is an encounter between God and man. In blessing, God’s gift and man’s acceptance of it are united in dialogue with each other. The prayer of blessing is man’s response to God's gifts: because God blesses, the human heart can in return bless the One who is the source of every blessing. (Catechism ...


6

Your question is interesting and it is something that I have talked about a lot Since I was part of that movement in the early 90s and left it only to eventually begin studying Early Church history and theology later. It is very difficult (possibly impossible) to find anything like the Faith and Prosperity Movement in the Early Church. While the Early ...


5

"Bless you!" is short for "[May God] bless you!" So, you are not blessing a priest, but asking God to.


5

I'll handle these questions in two parts: first, the connection between the words blessed and elect (including, as you request, a definition of blessed), and second, if the qualities listed are somehow indications of whether someone is elect or not. Connection between blessed and elect It's very clear to Calvinists, and, I suspect, to at least most ...


5

Yes, it is completely valid to attribute any blessing to God from a variety of Christian perspectives. In short, all things are ordained by God. As for the "less attractive" person, God has most likely blessed her with other attributes. And if not, a perfectly Christian answer to why some are blessed with certain things and other are not is the one God ...


4

Blessing of an item is sort of a "package for prayer". The blessing is essentially a prayer for something to remind us Christ and our faith. For example, water reminds especially baptism and everything Jesus did about it in the events recorded in Bible (not only in New Testaments, there are some images pointing to baptism in Old Testament, like passage ...


4

All baptized persons may bless, even non-Catholics. But not all blessings may be given by all people. As a vague rule, blessings involve things and persons over which one has been granted spiritual authority by God. For this reason, parents can appropriately bless their children, persons their homes, and those with appropriate Holy Orders can bless water, ...


4

The practice is not Christian, by doctrine, but became Christian by circumstance. During the Black Death, a plague which killed approximately 25% of the Earth's population in 14th century, sneezing was thought to be a first symptom of the infected. But the practice can be traced to long before that, however, it is still related to the Black Death. Gregory I ...


4

The Pope can bless objects and people implicitly during his audiences - any prayer and speech of the Pope gives Apostolic or Papal blessing to those listening and seeing the pope and to their loved ones unable to participate but connected through prayer. Any "holy symbol" the blessed people have with intention to have it blessed is blessed too (I guess that ...


4

Searched the raccolata for bacon and came up empty. So I'd suspect if there is any bacon blessing, it is a private devotion. Although its adherents are clearly numerous. The official organization who evaluates popular piety is the Congregation for Divine Worship. And you can read tons about its rules here. I'd imagine that if this prayer were made ...


4

The page linked to in the question shows two versions of the Prayer over the Water which were introduced in 2015. These are alternatives, in "accessible language", to the main Prayer over the Water in the Common Worship baptism liturgy. The Common Worship baptism liturgy is itself an alternative to the Book of Common Prayer baptism liturgy which, alone, is ...


3

Is there really a Catholic “blessing for bacon?” There seems to be no liturgically known prayer for bacon that I am able to locate, but I do believe the one named above is real, especially if it comes down to a permitted English translation of the official Latin Rituale Romanum of the Roman Rite. It should be pointed out that Latin word lardum may be ...


3

The Lord is blessed in His very being as part of His condition or state of being (along with timeless, omnipotent, omniscient, good, etc.). We can simply announce that as a way of blessing God. “Blessed be the Lord” may by our desire that all know His "condition," or let all celebrate His blessed "condition." Noah, Abraham, et al., blessed others with a ...


3

Each passage was written for its times and its own purpose. The threats of intergenerational accountability (Exodus 20:5, Exodus 34:7, Numbers 14:18, Deuteronomy 5:9) were written to make the Jews really think about the consequences of worshipping other gods - they might not have been worried about their own fate, but what about their children and ...


3

The reason is: The Church provided a special blessing of wine in honor of the Saint. According to legend St. John drank a glass of poisoned wine without suffering harm because he had blessed it before he drank. The wine is also a symbol of the great love of Christ that filled St. John's heart with loyalty, courage and enthusiasm for his Master; he ...


3

Granmirupa is correct. Going to add a little more info. According to the St. Anthony Messenger: BOOK "According to Francis X. Weiser in the Handbook of Christian Feasts and Customs (Harcourt Brace), as late as 1952 Catholics in Central Europe brought wine and cider to church for blessing on the feast of St. John. They then took it home and some of them ...


3

It's worth noting that even though IVF is a bad thing, this has no spiritual implications for people conceived in such a way. God is a master of making lemonade from lemons (Romans 8:28). In fact, if you trace the genealogies of Jesus, you'll find that in the genealogy according to Matthew, Jesus is said to be descended from Solomon, and in the genealogy ...


2

The priest blessing is a sacramental (not a sacrament). So it can confer to the person who receive it a special grace. Also it can bring indulgences as in the Urbi et Orbi blessing or the Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament. The paternal blessing is important and a very old tradition as stated in the Bible: "Benedictio patris firmat domos filiorum" (The ...


2

Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, what someone finds beautiful, another finds ugly. If they can use their beauty to help others it could even be a gift. I think of Queen Esther in these regards, she was blessed with beauty and that gave her the opportunity to become a queen. She used what she had (beauty) to become a queen. And she had courage enough to ...


2

Physical beauty is not ultimately subjective. Our notions of physical beauty are often tainted and perverted by sin, but they're ultimately and objectively based on health and procreative power. Numerous studies confirm this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Physical_attractiveness. And, particularly in Catholicism, procreative power and the act of procreation ...


2

My Dad used to have some words hung on the wall in his office that said, "I'm me, I'm wonderful, 'cause God don't make junk." I say that because I think this is what it's all about. Neither my Dad (nor I for that matter) are particularly attractive men. We're both stocky and somewhat short. That being said, I could consider my build to be a curse, or I ...


2

Short Answer: Biblically speaking, absolutely not. First, let me clarify that I do think a case could be made that disfigurement is the result of sin. For example, if a person were covered in warts, or scars, or had a cleft lip, or was missing an eye, or was obese, or malnourished, I think it would be safe to say that person had experienced the effects of ...


2

It's important to keep in mind that the stories about the patriarchs are both stories about individuals and "national origin" stories giving an identity to the whole nation of Israel. So in the case of Jacob (also known as Israel), the promises get borne out (a) in his great success as a herdsman for his uncle Laban, accumulating a huge amount of personal ...


2

I think what you did is rather good. Even pope Francis 1st, just elected, asked everybody to bless him: And now I would like to give the blessing, but first - first I ask a favour of you: before the Bishop blesses his people, I ask you to pray to the Lord that he will bless me: the prayer of the people asking the blessing for their Bishop. Let us ...


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