40

The issue with copyright translations. One translation that was produced with the specific intention of avoiding copyright entanglements is the World English Bible. It is modernization of the American Standard Version (ASV) placed into the public domain. A paragraph from the site's FAQ is worth quoting: The copyright laws of most nations and the ...


31

Yes, it is absolutely possible for editions of the Bible to contain errors. There is no magical mechanism to prevent this. There are some notorious printing mistakes, for example: A 1631 printing of the King James version is now called the "Wicked Bible", owing to its rendering of Exodus 20:14, Thou shalt commit adultery In 1763, the "Fool's Bible" said ...


31

In the United States, Copyright law has two basic categories - protected works and public domain. When a work has been around long enough (currently 95 years after the first publication or 70 years after the author's death) it enters the public domain, and is therefore allowed to be reproduced at will. According to the "Copyright Act", any work published ...


29

What is the significance of the awkward spacing (on the right below) when songs are printed in the bible? First, to state the obvious: the translators have determined that this represents poetry. Within the domain of poetry, the "awkward spacing" you ask about has a technical name: stichometric division. Unfortunately, neither what constitutes poetry nor ...


28

There are specific reasons that can be identified in each instance, but the three you mention share one important feature: they are Semitic (i.e. Aramaic or Hebrew) words amid the (otherwise) Greek New Testament. The most basic reason for an English translation to transliterate1 rather than translate these terms, then, is to reproduce what a Greek reader ...


24

It is important to understand that we do not have an "original copy" of any book of the Bible. What we have are copies of copies of copies... (manuscripts), from which "Textual Critics" seek to ascertain the original wording. It is the original wording that most Bible scholars hold to be perfect and inspired by God. Many modern Christians view "The Bible" ...


22

That's a very tricky question which deserves some bullet points. The scripture used during Mass and liturgical events and prayers (Benediction, Liturgy of the Hours) should always come from the Vulgate (Latin) Bible. In the United States we use the older New American Bible, with the revised edition waiting in the wings to be implemented at some future date (...


21

A convention in many Bibles is to do exactly as you say - convert the Tetragrammaton (YHWH) into LORD. To be sure, you should look at your Bible's preface. In the New Testament, which was composed in Greek, the word Kurios (e.g. Kyrie Elesion) is a title as opposed to a Proper Name. To be clear: יהוה (Yahweh) = LORD - specific name, אֲדֹנָי (Adonai) = ...


21

The reason is that "Jehovah" (or any transliteration) does belong there, and in these specific cases, the replacement would sound strikingly incorrect. Exo 6:3: And I appeared unto Abraham, unto Isaac, and unto Jacob, but the Name of God Almighty, but by my name LORD was I not knowen to them If both occurences were to be understood as "title", "authority"...


21

The apparent wordplay of Bathsheba bathing in the story of David and Bathsheba in 2 Samuel 11 is purely an artifact of English translation. In the original Hebrew, the "Bath" in "Bathsheba" has no connection at all with the word translated "bathing" in some translations of 2 Samuel 11:2. The Hebrew name בַּת־שֶׁבַע (bath-sheba) is a compound word composed ...


20

One of the reasons for the variance in names is that languages often don't share the same sounds as Greek or Hebrew. For instance, Russian has no "th" sound. Consequently, the sound of that name cannot be reproduced in Russian. In Greek, it is ματθαιος, or /Mat-thaios/. Russian translates this as Матфей, or Matfay. So, the "th" becomes an "f". Also, ...


20

Some major problems with "KJV-onlyism" lies in the assumptions it makes and some of which you enumerated. From an evangelical perspective, we accept the idea that the Bible is, indeed, the word of God. Specifically, "men spoke from God as they were carried along by the Holy Spirit." 20 knowing this first of all, that no prophecy of Scripture comes from ...


20

First of all, these two translations are extremely different. Here's Genesis 1:1 in The Street Bible: First off, nothing. No light, no time, no substance, no matter. Second off, God starts it all off and WHAP! Stuff everywhere! And in the KJV: In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth. There's obviously a significant difference between ...


19

Jehovah’s Witnesses use the standard 66-book Protestant Bible, but usually use their own translation thereof (they do reference other translations from time to time, but generally use The New World Translation). It’s fair to say that the NWT is quite, let’s say, distinctive in places, and has received a fair amount of criticism. The Witnesses do not in any ...


18

Yes, they do. It's called New World Translation. There are several verses with a completely different meaning than other translations, such as John 1:1 1 In [the] beginning the Word was, and the Word was with God, and the Word was a god Quite different than the NIV translation 1 In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the ...


17

The first five books are closely linked together - they are the "Torah" (Hebrew for "teaching" or "instruction") traditionally attributed to Moses. This explains why they can be called "The Five Books of Moses"; the Greek "Pentateuch" means "five books" and is another title for this section of the Bible. Calling the books after Moses makes sense, and avoids ...


17

According to the Online Etymology Dictionary, the word apple has, until recently, always meant simply "fruit" in English. This was certainly the case at the time of the earliest English Bible translations in the 1600s. In Middle English and as late as 17c., it was a generic term for all fruit other than berries but including nuts (e.g. Old English ...


17

The short answer to the question is: in museums and libraries throughout the world. The sheer number of fragments alone means that no one academic entity - let alone even one government or ecclesiastical authority - can "own" them all. There are over 5500 manuscripts, miniscules, unicals, papyri, parchments, and fragments that critical scholars have used ...


16

The usual criticism is readability. The KJV was originally translated in the 1600's, and even though it's been updated several times since then, there are still words that have different meanings now than they did in the English of the time. The literary style is clearly less modern than more recent translations. Another criticism is based on the ...


16

Yes there is. And like the KJV-only movement, it is not monolithic. For English speakers, it's important to recognize that the Reina Valera (RVR) is a group of Bible translations that continues to dominate the Bible translation market in Spanish-speaking countries. They primarily rely on the Textus Receptus, like the KJV, not modern critical Greek texts, ...


15

The New King James version is meant to be an update (circa 1975) of the vocabulary and grammar of the King James Version, while preserving the classic style and literary beauty of the original 1611 KJV version. 130 translators used the original King James version as well as Greek, Aramaic, and Hebrew texts including the Dead Sea Scrolls. The translators ...


15

From the Watchtower Organization's own "Reasoning From the Scriptures": "As a basis for translating the Hebrew Scriptures, the text of Rudolf Kittel's 'Biblia Hebraica' editions of 1951-1955, was used. The 1984 revision of the New World Translation benefited from updating in harmony with the 'Biblia Stuttgartensia' of 1977. Additionally, the Dead Sea ...


15

Of the non-public domain translations, the NET Bible has the most liberal licence for copying passages - you can read its licence. You can copy, but not alter or distribute commercially. If you wish to have complete freedom to act without legal restriction then you need a public domain translation. There are a number of translations which are out of ...


15

Overall, general accessibility to books was difficult for two of the reasons you mention: The were extremely expensive to make According to this source, we have the report of a book taking four weeks to copy (by hand, of course, and costing "53 shillings." At that same point in time, a pig was 10 pence, meaning that one book would have been equivalent to ...


14

From the ESV Wikipedia link (emphasis added): The result is a translation that is more literal than the popular New International Version, but more idiomatic than the New American Standard Bible. That's probably the main difference. So ESV is going to be more literal, less figurative and free from exaggeration/embellishment in it's translations and is ...


14

Your question seems to be referring to: And there is salvation in no one else, for there is no other name under heaven given among men by which we must be saved. - Acts 4:12 ESV Which in context is referring to the name given in verse 10: let it be known to all of you and to all the people of Israel that by the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth, whom ...


14

There are a few. Some of them are published as academic works, while others are intended for the common use and worship (especially in Eastern Orthodox Churches). The first was The Holy Bible containing the Old and New Covenant, translated by Charles Thomson in 1808 (though he did not include the apocrypha). It can still be bought today. The translation was ...


13

Before selecting a translation of the Bible for reading or study, it is helpful to understand the goals of the various translations available and how they relate to what you're trying to accomplish by reading the Bible. The way this is commonly categorized is "word for word" translations vs. "thought for thought" translations. Word for word translations ...


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