49

The issue with copyright translations. One translation that was produced with the specific intention of avoiding copyright entanglements is the World English Bible. It is modernization of the American Standard Version (ASV) placed into the public domain. A paragraph from the site's FAQ is worth quoting: The copyright laws of most nations and the ...


36

In the United States, Copyright law has two basic categories - protected works and public domain. When a work has been around long enough (currently 95 years after the first publication or 70 years after the author's death) it enters the public domain, and is therefore allowed to be reproduced at will. According to the "Copyright Act", any work published ...


30

What is the significance of the awkward spacing (on the right below) when songs are printed in the bible? First, to state the obvious: the translators have determined that this represents poetry. Within the domain of poetry, the "awkward spacing" you ask about has a technical name: stichometric division. Unfortunately, neither what constitutes poetry nor ...


27

There are specific reasons that can be identified in each instance, but the three you mention share one important feature: they are Semitic (i.e. Aramaic or Hebrew) words amid the (otherwise) Greek New Testament. The most basic reason for an English translation to transliterate1 rather than translate these terms, then, is to reproduce what a Greek reader ...


21

The reason is that "Jehovah" (or any transliteration) does belong there, and in these specific cases, the replacement would sound strikingly incorrect. Exo 6:3: And I appeared unto Abraham, unto Isaac, and unto Jacob, but the Name of God Almighty, but by my name LORD was I not knowen to them If both occurences were to be understood as "title&...


21

The apparent wordplay of Bathsheba bathing in the story of David and Bathsheba in 2 Samuel 11 is purely an artifact of English translation. In the original Hebrew, the "Bath" in "Bathsheba" has no connection at all with the word translated "bathing" in some translations of 2 Samuel 11:2. The Hebrew name בַּת־שֶׁבַע (bath-sheba) is a compound word composed ...


20

First of all, these two translations are extremely different. Here's Genesis 1:1 in The Street Bible: First off, nothing. No light, no time, no substance, no matter. Second off, God starts it all off and WHAP! Stuff everywhere! And in the KJV: In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth. There's obviously a significant difference between ...


19

According to the Online Etymology Dictionary, the word apple has, until recently, always meant simply "fruit" in English. This was certainly the case at the time of the earliest English Bible translations in the 1600s. In Middle English and as late as 17c., it was a generic term for all fruit other than berries but including nuts (e.g. Old English ...


17

The short answer to the question is: in museums and libraries throughout the world. The sheer number of fragments alone means that no one academic entity - let alone even one government or ecclesiastical authority - can "own" them all. There are over 5500 manuscripts, miniscules, unicals, papyri, parchments, and fragments that critical scholars have used ...


16

Of the non-public domain translations, the NET Bible has the most liberal licence for copying passages - you can read its licence. You can copy, but not alter or distribute commercially. If you wish to have complete freedom to act without legal restriction then you need a public domain translation. There are a number of translations which are out of ...


16

There are a few. Some of them are published as academic works, while others are intended for the common use and worship (especially in Eastern Orthodox Churches). The first was The Holy Bible containing the Old and New Covenant, translated by Charles Thomson in 1808 (though he did not include the apocrypha). It can still be bought today. The translation was ...


16

Yes there is. And like the KJV-only movement, it is not monolithic. For English speakers, it's important to recognize that the Reina Valera (RVR) is a group of Bible translations that continues to dominate the Bible translation market in Spanish-speaking countries. They primarily rely on the Textus Receptus, like the KJV, not modern critical Greek texts, ...


15

From the Watchtower Organization's own "Reasoning From the Scriptures": "As a basis for translating the Hebrew Scriptures, the text of Rudolf Kittel's 'Biblia Hebraica' editions of 1951-1955, was used. The 1984 revision of the New World Translation benefited from updating in harmony with the 'Biblia Stuttgartensia' of 1977. Additionally, the Dead Sea ...


15

Overall, general accessibility to books was difficult for two of the reasons you mention: The were extremely expensive to make According to this source, we have the report of a book taking four weeks to copy (by hand, of course, and costing "53 shillings." At that same point in time, a pig was 10 pence, meaning that one book would have been equivalent to ...


14

Your question seems to be referring to: And there is salvation in no one else, for there is no other name under heaven given among men by which we must be saved. - Acts 4:12 ESV Which in context is referring to the name given in verse 10: let it be known to all of you and to all the people of Israel that by the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth, whom ...


14

A brief history of events leading up to the publication of the King James Authorised version of the Bible may help to explain why the Catholic Church does not sanction this translation. Mary Queen of Scots gave birth to her son James in 1566 in Scotland. In June 1567 the Protestant lords rebelled against their queen. They arrested and imprisoned Mary in ...


13

Before selecting a translation of the Bible for reading or study, it is helpful to understand the goals of the various translations available and how they relate to what you're trying to accomplish by reading the Bible. The way this is commonly categorized is "word for word" translations vs. "thought for thought" translations. Word for word translations ...


12

The most word used is "porneia" (πορνεία), and according to Strong's means "illicit sexual intercourse" - particularly fornication, or sexual intercourse outside marriage. This of course is the real point here - Paul isn't slamming sexual desire and intercourse as a bad thing - look at Song of Solomon. What he is warning against is sex in the absence of the ...


12

The 'red letters' are not themselves part of the KJV translation. The red letters appear in many different translation of the Bible. To answer the question: no, there is not universal agreement about exactly what words in the Bible were spoken by Jesus. The New Testament languages did not include punctuation like quote marks. Most of the time it is pretty ...


12

The King James Version is not accepted by the Catholic Church. Primarily because it is translated to fit Anglican theology src1 src2. There is no Catholic edition of the NIV either. Not to mention these misses Deuterocanonical Books. Regarding NRSV make sure it is a Catholic edition. The correct bible that a Catholic is supposed to use is the Latin Vulgate ...


12

As a matter of fact, it appears from two etymological entries (in Etymonline.com) that "James" comes not from "Joshua" but from "Jacob": masc. proper name, name of two of Christ's disciples, late 12c. Middle English vernacular form of Late Latin Jacomus (source of Old French James, Spanish Jaime, Italian Giacomo), altered from Latin Jacobus (see Jacob). ...


12

The decisions you mention really are the major issues, but one other point has gotten notice as well. Inclusive Language The article The NRSV vs the ESV, while critical of both translations, says of the NRSV: The main change found in the NRSV, and that which has been the most controversial, is its elimination of masculine-oriented language. The NRSV was the ...


11

According to Wycliffe, this is the state of Bible Translation today: The worldwide status of Bible translation (2012): 6,800+ ...the number of languages spoken in the world today Under 2,000...the number of languages without any of the Bible, but with a possible need of a Bible translation to begin about 209 million...the number of people ...


11

The Southern Baptist Convention, while the highest authority within the Southern Baptist church, is not technically an authority amongst Baptists. It functions as a voluntary association with which member churches may choose to associate, but cannot dictate terms to anyone. While it does approve changes to the "Baptist Faith and Message," these are to be ...


11

It's not so much something lost in translation, though there may be some cultural factors coming into play. Jews considered the Words of the ten commandments to be minimum requirements, and beginning with Matthew 5:21, Jesus expounds on some the commandments pertaining to the relationship to other other people. The essence of the teaching in Matthew 5:21 ff ...


11

The app you're referring to is JW Library. Jehovah's Witnesses prefer using the New World Translation in general for several reasons, however that feature of the app is there because the full sense of some scriptures can often be better understood by cross-referencing with the wording of other Bibles. We use many translations in our personal study of the ...


11

In the prefaces of many Bible translations, there are notes that describe the origin of these headers: As an aid to the reader, sectional headings have been inserted. They are not to be regarded as part of the biblical text and are not intended for oral reading. It is the committee’s hope that these headings may prove more helpful to the reader than the ...


11

All languages change over time, all aspects of it are subject to change from basic orthography to fundamental meanings of words. It is highly unlikely that even you are actually using the KJV as published in 1611. Given the spelling and choice of words used in your question, you don't speak King James era English, you speak something quite a bit more modern....


10

Opponents to the KJV-Only position generally don’t disparage the King James Version (KJV) or treat it as necessarily inferior to contemporary English translations, but instead point out that it faces many of the same challenges and errors that face any English translation. Depending on the opponent you ask, each will probably tell you one of any number of ...


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