10

Origen's commentaries do indeed appear to be the earliest surviving line-by-line, self-contained biblical commentaries. This becomes evident when we examine his closest competitors. We'll look first at Greek-speaking authors, and then at Latin. Greek About a hundred years before Origen's commentaries were written, Papias of Hierapolis wrote a lengthy work ...


9

John Wesley himself explains in the preface to his notes that he very highly regarded Matthew Henry's commentary and that much of his notes were abridgements of Henry's Work. Addressing those who owned a copy he wrote: . I do not advise these, much to trouble themselves about any other exposition than Mr Henry's: this is sufficient, thro' the assistance of ...


9

Perhaps not surprisingly, in light of Ephesians 5, church fathers widely connect Eve with Christ's Church. This seems to displace other interpretations, like a connection between Eve and the Holy Spirit. However, it is at least hinted at in Chrysostom, when he compares the Old Testament man to the New Testament man: Then [i.e., OT times] He said, “Let ...


6

A number of different answers to this question have been given by Christians through history. Broadly speaking, the reasons for the extensive detail given by Moses might be categorized as follows: (1) to foreshadow future events and entities, (2) to demonstrate the importance of religious worship, and (3) to display God's glory. Foreshadowing Christians ...


5

Well, it would indeed be burdensome if it was taken in a way not intended by the words, namely, literally. Jesus uses hyperbole a lot in His teaching, so that it would be very memorable to his disciples, who were chosen to convey His teaching to the nations—and even to their audience. The meaning of 'cut off rather than' is a hyperbolic way of teaching us to ...


4

And he came to Nazareth, where he had been brought up: and, as his custom was, he went into the synagogue on the sabbath day, and stood up for to read. Luke 4:16 KJV. Luke records that it was Jesus' custom to attend synagogue on the sabbath in the town where he had been brought up by Joseph and Mary, and to read from the scripture in public. Once ...


4

Although Jesus didn't write about the Bible (which at that time would of course be just the Old Testament), He did teach about it. In addition to the specific quotations listed in Ruminator's answer, there's Luke 24:27 about the discussion on the road to Emmaus: Beginning at Moses and all the prophets, he expounded to them in all the scriptures the ...


3

If Exodus 25-27 is a literal, eyewitness report of what Moses was told by God to do, then this must remain a mystery. However, the Documentary Hypothesis holds that the Book of Exodus was written over a period of centuries during the early to middle parts of the first millennium BCE. While the old Documentary Hypothesis is no longer seen as immutable, this ...


3

Jewish commentators like Rashi, Ibn Ezra, etc. write comments on the Old Testament(Torah). Jews only have the Torah while Christians have one more set of books, the New Testament. Jewish commentators write explanations based on Jewish traditions and oral traditions, some of which are unknown to Christians. There are also Christian Bible commentators. For ...


3

This answer will draw on two published Christian commentaries on the construction of the Tabernacle: The anonymous book of Hebrews (traditionally attributed to Paul) in the New Testament, a first century Christian work, which provides a broad-strokes exposition of the Tabernacle as referring to heaven and Christ's work there. Arcana Coelestia ("Secrets of ...


3

It would appear that the two don't relate at all. I suspect that these verses in the resource that you've linked to are as a result of a transcription error as they don't appear at all in this version nor even in the version that studylight claims for it's source.


3

The only recorded instance of Jesus writing anything that I'm aware of is this account which has an uncertain provenance: [Jhn 8:2-11 NKJV] 2 Now early in the morning He came again into the temple, and all the people came to Him; and He sat down and taught them. 3 Then the scribes and Pharisees brought to Him a woman caught in adultery. And when they had ...


2

The evidence supports the conclusion that the Wolfius referred to by John Owen, Vicar of Thrussington, in his footnotes to Calvin's Commentary is Johann Christoph Wolf (1683-1739); and that the references made are to his book "Curae philologicae et criticae in Novum Testamentum". This is a copy. He studied at Wittenburg and amassed a library of some ...


1

He did not have a written commentary at all. But as Jesus was a Jewish boy who grew up in Jewish culture, every young Jewish child grew up familiar with the Law and the Prophets from at least 2 years old until He reached 13 (adulthood back in their day). This was why when He visited the Temple (when He stayed behind) boy Jesus amazed even temple teachers ...


1

Much of the apparent contradiction/paradox appears to result from careless renderings of the Greek text for 1 Jn 5:3, particularly the verbs and prepositions. A stricter, more careful rendering would read more like. "Because this, the agape-love of-the God is-being/existing, in-order-that we-might-be-guarding/watching-over the commandments of-Him, and they-...


1

Christ was always elevating the old testament law. Remember when he said if you look at another woman in lust you've already committed adultery, or that if you hate a man you've already committed murder. Remember the rich man that kept the commands since his childhood but went away sad because Christ said he had one thing left to do, to sell all that he ...


1

St. Thomas Aquinas's commentary on St. Matthew 5 says: And if thy right eye scandalize thee. Here the Lord shows how this precept [not to "look on a woman to lust after her" (Mt. 5:28)] can be easily observed, namely as follows: by avoiding occasions of sin. Placing oneself in occasions of sin is a sin, and this unnecessarily burdens oneself.


1

The Great question, I had heard the same thing (Eve / paraclete) so was searching Google and found this thread. The connection is not as founded as I had hoped it turns out. I think I was told at some point that the Greek word used in the LXX for the Hebrew "ezer" was "paraclete", but that's not the case after looking into it myself. What I did find in my ...


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