9

The Old Testament and Hebrew linguistic background of this passage should be kept in mind. Recall: Matthew (or his source) was likely translating words that were spoken in Hebrew or Aramaic. Both Jesus and Matthew likely had a Semitic mother tongue. The Hebrew bible (both in its Hebrew and Greek forms) was frequently referenced explicitly by both, ...


5

The Catholic Haydock Commentary says this about Mt. 5:6: Ver. 6. Hunger and thirst; i.e. spiritually, with an earnest desire of being just and holy. But others again understand such as endure with patience the hardships of hunger and thirst. (Witham) --- Rupertus understands those to whom justice is denied, such as poor widows and orphans. Maldonatus ...


3

The Beatitudes are the promises beginning with "Blessed are..." at the start of the Sermon on the Mount in Matthew, Chapter 5. It is Jesus speaking: Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. Blessed are those who mourn, for they will be comforted. Blessed are the meek, for they will inherit the earth. Blessed are ...


3

You are roughly correct, but with a condition I'll highlight later. When you are beaten, stolen, poisoned, and the world reviles you, you have less and less that is in between you and God. It's very evident that the more gifts, accolades, status, riches one has of the world, they only serve to distance that person from God since it reinforces the notion ...


2

What does it mean to be “poor in spirit”? Mat 5:3 Blessed are the poor in spirit: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. poor = ptōchos = Thayer Definition: 1) reduced to beggary, begging, asking alms 2) destitute of wealth, influence, position, honour 2a) lowly, afflicted, destitute of the Christian virtues and eternal riches 2b) helpless, powerless ...


1

As stated already, the beatitudes are in the first part of Matthew 5. But what most don't realize is that they are not merely suggestions or invitations. They are commandments. They are making the Lord's will known and when we know the Lord's will it should never be assumed that He had nothing to say and so He was idly blabbering. No, when the Lord speaks it ...


1

Poverty of spirit is nothing more than humility. "First He lays down humility as a foundation," writes Theophylact.1 Since Adam fell through pride, Christ raises us up by humility; for Adam had aspired to become God. The "poor in spirit" are those whose pride is crushed and are contrite in soul.2 "The pauper in spirit," wrote the 19th century ...


1

The word ptōchos used means absolute poverty. Spiritually speaking, the poor in spirit are those who recognize their utter lack of the Spirit. This is the first step one must recognize during conversion - that he lacks and need the Holy Spirit. Thus the poor in spirit are the ones who are blessed, because, unlike the proud Pharisees, they recognize with ...


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