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19

No, there is no reliable historical evidence to support such a claim. Before going into the question significantly, I should point out that the number of Baptists killed by the Catholic Church depends on how one defines "Baptist" - apparently, there are some who consider any early sect of Christianity which did not practice infant baptism to be a "proto-...


15

The United Methodist Church is a denomination that uses grape juice instead of wine. I am using them as an example because their reason is explicitly stated in the Book of Worship: Although the historic and ecumenical Christian practice has been to use wine, the use of unfermented grape juice by The United Methodist Church and its predecessors since the ...


9

I agree that Baptism is an outward expression of an inward change and isn't what saves you, yet even so, it is important to be baptised for three excellent reasons: It is a rite of initiation into the Christian community - Although our confession before God (of our faith in Christ and his Lordship over us) is of primary importance, Public confession of our ...


9

Laying the Groundwork The Transformation of Salvation It is important to note that, according to the Bible, the following things occur at the moment of salvation by faith alone: We, who were once dead, are made alive in Christ: When you were dead in your transgressions and the uncircumcision of your flesh, He made you alive together with Him, having ...


9

In fact, Baptists do have a catchecism. As John Piper writes here: Written in 1677, "The Baptist Catechism" was patterned after the Heidelberg and Westminster catechisms to teach Reformed doctrine from a Baptist perspective. The problem isn't the existence, but rather how many Baptists are willing to "cede my author-ITAY" (imagine your best Cartman ...


9

Baptists*, in particular, are fond saying "We have no creed but the Bible." As this wonderful video shows, that is a creed, but it gets to the heart of your question - why do Baptists view creeds negatively? [Really - go watch the video. It does a better job than I will of explaining the reasoning, and debunking it!] There is one scriptural reason and ...


9

According to an article on one of the ABC-USA's regional websites, "ordination is the process that a church enters to affirm the calling, giftedness, and service of the candidate, ordination cannot be detached from a place of service," and it is "a public affirmation of what God has already done." The article, as well as the SBC FAQ, says that ordination is ...


8

I know that personal opinion matters don't typically count, but as a Baptist that's had a conversation with other Baptists on this exact subject... I have yet to run into one that has a problem with Jeopardy or other game shows for the following reasons... It's not gambling because it doesn't rely on luck but rather knowledge and skill. It' more like ...


8

Baptists practice baptism because it is something taught in Scripture. Your question hits exactly on the distinction between those denominations that believe that baptism is necessary for salvation, and those that don't. Baptists don't see it as necessary for salvation. Instead, it's seen as an outward expression of obedience. The analogy is graduation....


8

Although the Pentecostal movement originated from Wesleyans (an infant baptism movement) these days the large majority of Pentecostal churches are adult or believers' baptism, and is it reasonable to say that Pentecostalism is a sub-branch of the Baptist movement. (My guess is that they shifted to believers' baptism because of their strong focus on being ...


8

Baptists in the main are part of the Reformed Protestant church, subscribing to the Westminster Confession of Faith, and you quote what C.H. Spurgeon said in 1866: “You remember how our Lord, who is the true Michael, the only great Archangel, said at the beginning of the preaching of the Gospel, ‘I beheld Satan as lightning falling from Heaven.’” (Our Lord’s ...


8

The closest equivalent to the British Strict Baptists in the US is Primitive Baptists, also called 'Old School Baptists' or 'Hardshell Baptists'. Like the Strict Baptists they practice believer's baptism and closed communion, take the Bible as their only doctrine, and eschew seminary training (they also oppose non-local missions). This theological statement ...


7

In 1 Corinthians 5:12-13 Paul says 12 For what have I to do with judging outsiders? Is it not those inside the church whom you are to judge? 13 God judges those outside. “Purge the evil person from among you.” Church membership is how we know who is and isn't a believer. The church, as a whole, is charged with the task of declaring who is and isn't a ...


6

No (though it does vary by church) One very influential Southern Baptist church is Capitol Hill Baptist Church, where Mark Dever is the Senior Pastor. Dever is well known as the author of Nine Marks of a Healthy Church (and founder of the associated ministry). One of the nine marks is church membership, in a much more prominent way than I've heard of in any ...


6

All Protestant churches that use grape juice instead of wine will attempt to show that it is either biblical to forgo wine or not unbiblical to do so; biblical, meaning that the terms "cup of wine", "wine", in the Bible do not necessarily mean the fermented wine, according to them. Once they state this proposition, they add that alcohol has the tendency to ...


6

The short answer is, they don't. They teach Sunday School. If you ask a Baptist, they'll probably tell you, we don't have a catechism. (Technically, they're wrong, but in practice, most haven't heard of it.) Furthermore, if asked to decribe what a catechism is, they will focus on the fact that it is a "rehearsed" set of formulaic questions and answers - ...


6

What are the main differences between the baptist and Pentecostal traditions? The main difference would be in how the spiritual gifts described in the New Testament operate today. There are three main views. Spiritual gifts were for the early church and none of them operate today. Some spiritual gifts still operate today. All spiritual gifts operate today ...


6

The Credo-baptists that affirm the Nicene creed, would argue that "baptism for the remission of sins" need not be interpreted as "baptism accomplishes the remission of sins", but more along the lines of "baptism witnesses the remission of sins" eg: ... The phrase, “We confess one baptism for the remission of sins,” does not mean that baptism leads to ...


6

I'll start out with the last part of your question. There is no explicit Biblical basis for this. Voting on membership into the Church is an outcome of several Baptist distinctives, the primary being the autonomy of the local congregation. From the Baptist Distinctives site's article on Church Governance Polity is how an organization, such as a church, ...


5

Many churches which do believe that baptism is symbolic also restrict participation in their services and church life to those who have been baptised: Many churches limit church membership to baptised people Some churches limit communion to baptised people (and some to members too) Some churches limit roles like service leading and preaching to baptised ...


5

I can only answer for my denomination (Baptist), but it was used as a supporting scripture for Immersion. During baptism, pastors would often say Buried in the likeness of His death, raised in the likeness of His resurrection or ...raised to walk in newness of life The idea is that baptism is a the believer's public confession of faith. And the ...


5

In most churches this is more a practical thing than a theological thing. Most people don't particularly want to appear in public in swimwear, and churches certainly don't want to leave open any possibility of being seen to be parading scantily clad people for baptism. Some traditions use baptismal robes, which are white and usually worn over regular ...


5

One of the key distinctives of Baptist churches is that they are congregationally governed and generally non-creedal. That means there's no overriding "Baptist" policy on who can and cannot teach in the church. You can be fairly certain that most Baptist churches will require a person to have been baptized as an adult in order to teach, but there are ...


5

I have not been able to find evidence of a Baptist argument for slavery that differs from other pro-slavery denominations. Baptist minister Richard Furman (for whom Furman University was named) published a philosophical defense of slavery that alluded to biblical support but did not elaborate on it. The proof texts would have been well known to his readers. ...


5

I think you would be hard-pressed to find any Baptists who "recognize" paedobaptism if by recognize you mean that they believe it is a valid and biblical practice. However, there are many denominations who distinguish between "essential" and "non-essential" doctrines. The essential doctrines are those that are essential to the faith so that to deny them is ...


5

The short answer is, "they know that baptism pre-dates Christ." Baptists are aware of the fact that baptism was practiced before Christ's incarnation, ministry, death, and resurrection. Baptists tend to a very literal interpretation of Scripture, and are well aware of the history behind baptism, and the fact that it's been practiced since well ...


4

This question is almost impossible to answer, as stated. As Baptists (by definition) have no unifying system of doctrine, the denomination as a whole has not made any kind of statement about how they deal with particular items, with the notable exception of baptism. That is to say, you'd have to ask each Baptist individual to find out what they believe. ...


4

Both the 2d London Baptist Confession of Faith of 1689 (often called "the 1689" by adherents) and the 1689 Federalism site provide great resources on this inquiry. In short, the main differences between a "reformed" baptist and a "general" baptist are: monergistic vs synergistic views of salvation a generally Calvinistic (ie "reformed") view of the state ...


4

First, "Baptist theology" is too general a term for a specific question which itself is a rather peripheral issue that is unlikely to see a uniform answer even from within one denomination. Therefore I do not think it can be answered except as regards general principals of theology. Baptist typically hold to either Arminian or Calvinistic theology. If ...


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