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21

My first answer wasn't very good; I want to take a different angle. I hope this approach helps make this issue more clear. TL;DR You don't have to stage a protest to be Protestant. It's a matter of heritage. Of fallacies and analogies... Your question commits some basic fallacies that can easily be addressed. cite an accurate historical reference that ...


19

No, there is no reliable historical evidence to support such a claim. Before going into the question significantly, I should point out that the number of Baptists killed by the Catholic Church depends on how one defines "Baptist" - apparently, there are some who consider any early sect of Christianity which did not practice infant baptism to be a "proto-...


15

The United Methodist Church is a denomination that uses grape juice instead of wine. I am using them as an example because their reason is explicitly stated in the Book of Worship: Although the historic and ecumenical Christian practice has been to use wine, the use of unfermented grape juice by The United Methodist Church and its predecessors since the ...


10

An important note. This topic is surely filled with material that is horribly offensive. In the text below, I am trying to describe various beliefs which I do not personally hold, and to which my denomination (regrettably, only since 1986) no longer subscribes. One Antichrist or many? The cited passage from 1 John does indeed talk about many antichrists; ...


9

I agree that Baptism is an outward expression of an inward change and isn't what saves you, yet even so, it is important to be baptised for three excellent reasons: It is a rite of initiation into the Christian community - Although our confession before God (of our faith in Christ and his Lordship over us) is of primary importance, Public confession of our ...


9

Laying the Groundwork The Transformation of Salvation It is important to note that, according to the Bible, the following things occur at the moment of salvation by faith alone: We, who were once dead, are made alive in Christ: When you were dead in your transgressions and the uncircumcision of your flesh, He made you alive together with Him, having ...


9

The idea behind the term "protestant" may have originated in those who literally protested the Catholic Church, but today it has a somewhat broader meaning. It has come to mean that a church believes that the Catholic Church lost its way, and that it is necessary to teach correct doctrine as described in the Bible, instead of Biblical doctrines mingled with ...


9

Hmm, I think Ignatius Theophorus has the most historically accurate answer, and yet as of my visit here he has the fewest votes. :-) Let me build on Ignatius. The term "Protestant" was coined when the Lutheran delegates to the Diet of Speyer protested against the pro-Catholic, anti-Lutheran decisions of that council. But from there the word "Protestant" ...


9

I believe you're confusing etymology with history. "Protestant" while it may have originally referred to a limited subset of non-Catholic Westerners (specifically, a very small group of Lutherans around the Diet of Speyer in 1529), now (generally) means "non-Catholic Christian" (Rome is not necessarily the definitive standard, however: "Protestant" or may ...


9

There is a teaching that is very common in Baptist Churches that the Baptist Church has its origins in the New Testament Church, long before the Reformation. A fair representation of the teaching is found at Providence Baptist Ministries. A summary of the teaching consists of the following points: There have always, since the time of the New Testament ...


9

In fact, Baptists do have a catchecism. As John Piper writes here: Written in 1677, "The Baptist Catechism" was patterned after the Heidelberg and Westminster catechisms to teach Reformed doctrine from a Baptist perspective. The problem isn't the existence, but rather how many Baptists are willing to "cede my author-ITAY" (imagine your best Cartman ...


9

Baptists*, in particular, are fond saying "We have no creed but the Bible." As this wonderful video shows, that is a creed, but it gets to the heart of your question - why do Baptists view creeds negatively? [Really - go watch the video. It does a better job than I will of explaining the reasoning, and debunking it!] There is one scriptural reason and ...


9

According to an article on one of the ABC-USA's regional websites, "ordination is the process that a church enters to affirm the calling, giftedness, and service of the candidate, ordination cannot be detached from a place of service," and it is "a public affirmation of what God has already done." The article, as well as the SBC FAQ, says that ordination is ...


8

I know that personal opinion matters don't typically count, but as a Baptist that's had a conversation with other Baptists on this exact subject... I have yet to run into one that has a problem with Jeopardy or other game shows for the following reasons... It's not gambling because it doesn't rely on luck but rather knowledge and skill. It' more like ...


8

Baptists practice baptism because it is something taught in Scripture. Your question hits exactly on the distinction between those denominations that believe that baptism is necessary for salvation, and those that don't. Baptists don't see it as necessary for salvation. Instead, it's seen as an outward expression of obedience. The analogy is graduation....


8

The closest equivalent to the British Strict Baptists in the US is Primitive Baptists, also called 'Old School Baptists' or 'Hardshell Baptists'. Like the Strict Baptists they practice believer's baptism and closed communion, take the Bible as their only doctrine, and eschew seminary training (they also oppose non-local missions). This theological statement ...


7

The modern Baptist denominations and adherents descend from the Anabaptist movement which was part of the 16th century Reformation. Several Baptist churches hold to similar creeds to the Nicene (or, more commonly in my experience, confessions of faith or faith statements). There are also hundreds of Baptist churches which call themselves "Reformed" (I grew ...


7

In 1 Corinthians 5:12-13 Paul says 12 For what have I to do with judging outsiders? Is it not those inside the church whom you are to judge? 13 God judges those outside. “Purge the evil person from among you.” Church membership is how we know who is and isn't a believer. The church, as a whole, is charged with the task of declaring who is and isn't a ...


7

Although the Pentecostal movement originated from Wesleyans (an infant baptism movement) these days the large majority of Pentecostal churches are adult or believers' baptism, and is it reasonable to say that Pentecostalism is a sub-branch of the Baptist movement. (My guess is that they shifted to believers' baptism because of their strong focus on being ...


7

Baptists in the main are part of the Reformed Protestant church, subscribing to the Westminster Confession of Faith, and you quote what C.H. Spurgeon said in 1866: “You remember how our Lord, who is the true Michael, the only great Archangel, said at the beginning of the preaching of the Gospel, ‘I beheld Satan as lightning falling from Heaven.’” (Our Lord’s ...


6

No (though it does vary by church) One very influential Southern Baptist church is Capitol Hill Baptist Church, where Mark Dever is the Senior Pastor. Dever is well known as the author of Nine Marks of a Healthy Church (and founder of the associated ministry). One of the nine marks is church membership, in a much more prominent way than I've heard of in any ...


6

All Protestant churches that use grape juice instead of wine will attempt to show that it is either biblical to forgo wine or not unbiblical to do so; biblical, meaning that the terms "cup of wine", "wine", in the Bible do not necessarily mean the fermented wine, according to them. Once they state this proposition, they add that alcohol has the tendency to ...


6

There's a belief among Baptists known as the "Trail of Blood," which traces Baptist beliefs back through the Anabaptists, Waldensians and various other groups all the way back to the pre-Nicene church. Take a look at "The Pilgrim Church" by E.H. Broadbent for more info on that. As far as I understand the claim, there's really no way to authenticate it one ...


6

The short answer is, they don't. They teach Sunday School. If you ask a Baptist, they'll probably tell you, we don't have a catechism. (Technically, they're wrong, but in practice, most haven't heard of it.) Furthermore, if asked to decribe what a catechism is, they will focus on the fact that it is a "rehearsed" set of formulaic questions and answers - ...


6

The Credo-baptists that affirm the Nicene creed, would argue that "baptism for the remission of sins" need not be interpreted as "baptism accomplishes the remission of sins", but more along the lines of "baptism witnesses the remission of sins" eg: ... The phrase, “We confess one baptism for the remission of sins,” does not mean that baptism leads to ...


6

I'll start out with the last part of your question. There is no explicit Biblical basis for this. Voting on membership into the Church is an outcome of several Baptist distinctives, the primary being the autonomy of the local congregation. From the Baptist Distinctives site's article on Church Governance Polity is how an organization, such as a church, ...


5

I can only answer for my denomination (Baptist), but it was used as a supporting scripture for Immersion. During baptism, pastors would often say Buried in the likeness of His death, raised in the likeness of His resurrection or ...raised to walk in newness of life The idea is that baptism is a the believer's public confession of faith. And the ...


5

Many churches which do believe that baptism is symbolic also restrict participation in their services and church life to those who have been baptised: Many churches limit church membership to baptised people Some churches limit communion to baptised people (and some to members too) Some churches limit roles like service leading and preaching to baptised ...


5

In most churches this is more a practical thing than a theological thing. Most people don't particularly want to appear in public in swimwear, and churches certainly don't want to leave open any possibility of being seen to be parading scantily clad people for baptism. Some traditions use baptismal robes, which are white and usually worn over regular ...


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