15

Protestants believe in the Priesthood of all Believers, which is to say that protestants believe that all Christians have a direct connection with God--there is no need to go through a Priest. That's not to say that they don't have Priests or Pastors or other figures of leadership, but they don't fulfill the role of mediator between man and God, that they ...


9

The policy for who presides at sacrament meeting is found in Handbook 2, 18.2*: The bishop oversees ward meetings. He presides at these meetings unless a member of the stake presidency, an Area Seventy, or a General Authority attends. His counselors may conduct ward meetings and may preside if he is absent. Presiding authorities and visiting high ...


9

From Brittanica.com: Tyrant, Greek tyrannos, a cruel and oppressive ruler or, in ancient Greece, a ruler who seized power unconstitutionally or inherited such power. In the 10th and 9th centuries BCE, monarchy was the usual form of government in the Greek states. The aristocratic regimes that replaced monarchy were by the 7th century BCE themselves ...


8

Speaking as a lifelong Protestant, I would say that in genuine Protestantism, the Head of every man is Christ. There is no hierarchy. None is above another. The greatest is as the least. But it is true that a man's gift will make room for him and spiritual men will appreciate and be voluntarily subject to others more spiritual than themselves. I have added ...


7

Does the English text Book of Mormon have just as much authority as, say, the Greek text of Matthew's Gospel ? The New Testament part of the Holy Bible, that is to say the collection of volumes contained in, for example, the Authorised Version, from Matthew to Revelation, is compiled from thousands of manuscripts, either partial, fragmented or (rarely) ...


6

The era of the Crusades certainly coincides with a dramatic increase in the authority of the Pope, both in practical terms and in the development of doctrine. It is a bit hard to untangle how much of this is due to the Crusades themselves. First, a word of warning! It is very easy to slip into anachronistic habits when thinking about the medieval papacy. It ...


6

The Deuterocanon quoted (or referred to) in the New Testament Other answers give lists, but here's a quick one with the cross-references in the Protestant King James Bible (1611). Matthew 6:14-15 and Sirach 7:14 Matthew 27:43 and Wisdom 2:15,16 Luke 6:31 and Tobit 4:15 Luke 14:13 and Tobit 4:7 John 10:22 and 1 Maccabees 4:59 Romans and Wisdom, clay and the ...


6

How can Protestants authoritatively declare something as wrong or heretical under Sola Scriptura? Actually, we have a perfect example in Jesus. Jesus, when he lived on earth as a man, constantly quoted the scriptures of the Old Testament as a way to rebuke the errors of His days. Even as a child, who "grew, and waxed strong in spirit" Luke 2:40, the rabbis ...


6

The authority given to the resurrected and glorified Christ includes his role as mediator for sinful humans, just as he also has the roles of Priest and King. Since ascending to heaven, sinful humanity still needs intercession, because they cannot approach a holy and righteous God. The authority granted to the Son of God includes his role as intercessor in ...


5

Matt. 6:19-20 - Jesus' statement about laying up for yourselves treasure in heaven follows Sirach 29:11 - lay up your treasure. Matt.. 7:12 - Jesus' golden rule "do unto others" is the converse of Tobit 4:15 - what you hate, do not do to others. Matt. 7:16,20 - Jesus' statement "you will know them by their fruits" follows Sirach 27:6 - the fruit discloses ...


5

Some of the other answers have highlighted the Evangelical and Mainstream Protestant positions on the interpretation of scripture. I wanted to draw attention to a different position adopted by Anabaptist churches, specifically Mennonite, Amish, Brethren and some related churches. In those churches interpretation of the scriptures is done by the community. ...


5

[The Law of Common Consent] is that in God’s earthly kingdom, the King counsels what should be done, but then he allows his subjects to accept or reject his proposals. Unless the principle of free agency is operated in righteousness men do not progress to ultimate salvation in the heavenly kingdom hereafter. Accordingly, church officers are selected by the ...


5

Perhaps another way to answer the OP is to say that it is based on a false contrast. As an analogy, consider the following sentences: Jazz is the best kind of music and country is the best kind of music. Jazz is the best kind of music and the trumpet is the best instrument. In the first sentence there is a contradiction because the contradictory ...


5

I think your question stems from a misunderstanding of the nature of authority. To have authority does not simply mean to have absolute control over something. Authority is often - even usually - given to someone by someone else, and is exercised on their behalf. An army officer has authority over his men, but he also receives his own orders and is expected ...


4

As others have remarked, Protestantism doesn't recognize a central authority, or any intermediary but Christ between the faithful and God. This (like other Protestant teachings) is a reaction to the perceived abuses of the Catholic Church of the time (the mere naming of the faith is a witness to its reactive origins). Others have expounded the doctrine of ...


4

Unlike the Roman Catholic Church, in Protestant Churches there is no central single authority for interpreting scriptures and to layout fixed doctrines to follow. This is why there are many denominations among the Protestants. Denominations within themselves have their own doctrines to follow but it's always slightly different from other Protestant ...


4

Why is the matter of women's authority determined by Eve's acts in her life? 1 Timothy 2:14 And Adam was not deceived, but the woman being deceived was in the transgression. Paul is not describing a penalty on women in general because of something the first woman did. Paul is using Eve as an example of one of the the differences between men and women....


4

The morality of secession is related to the tyrannicide (killing of tyrants) thesis of the Spanish scholastic Jesuit Fr. Juan de Mariana, ch. 5 of his De Rege. The economist Jesús Huerta de Soto, who specializes in Spanish scholasticism, describes Fr. De Mariana's thesis in his article "Juan de Mariana and the Spanish Scholastics" (cf. his related lecture): ...


4

No, the Church does not have to submit to private revelation, even if they are approved and are deemed worthy of belief. Private revelation is outside the deposit of faith and thus the Catholic faithful is not obliged to submit to a particular revelation. Nevertheless some prudence must be applied in whether or not the faithful should believe a particular ...


4

Jesus says, As the Father has sent Me, even so I send you. so the question to start, How did the father send Jesus? John 12:49 For I have not spoken on My own authority; but the Father who sent Me gave Me a command, what I should say and what I should speak. john 5:19 19 Then Jesus answered and said to them, “Most assuredly, I say to you, the Son ...


4

There is a particular problem with using the Westminster Confession of Faith (WCF) to either defend, or attack, doctrinal positions. It is that the Westminster Assembly (in the mid 1600s), and I quote: “…was rather reluctant to include texts and only added them after the catechism had been completed. In other words, the original catechism was not ...


4

The entire line of reasoning you're following, from the quotes themselves to your re-statements of what the quotes mean to your final conclusion, takes some alogical jumps that end in a flat-out contradiction. The contradiction becomes plain if you start with the first quote: When a Confession corresponds to Scripture as an account of the Church’s ...


4

To be honest, I'm not sure what leads you to ask the question. Almost all Christians and almost all Christian denominations/movements have a positive view of textual criticism. The facts are that humans are fallible document copiers, and we therefore have thousands of manuscripts with minor differences. And as much as classicists and historians value the ...


4

When you start by claiming, “Within Protestantism there is no universal definition of theology or how to understand the Bible…” that risks distortion of the facts. Good though the question is, it needs to be pointed out at the outset that the definition of theology is not a problem, let alone a question, among Protestants. All Protestants are agreed that ...


4

The Deaf and Mute. God loves all people. Some cannot utter a word and use sign language, so pronunciation must not be a showstopper for God. A Different Jesus. The meaning behind the name – personality, character, teachings, actions and relationship to the Father, to Israel and its history (as savior) - is more important than the name. 4 For if someone ...


4

I'll assume this question is based on Acts 4:12 Nor is there salvation in any other, for there is no other name under heaven given among men by which we must be saved. The word "name", G3686 - onoma, is defined by Outline of Biblical Usage as: the name is used for everything which the name covers, everything the thought or feeling of which is ...


3

The teaching of both Roman and Eastern traditions is that the Bible can only be understood in the context of culture and traditions which birthed it. The reader must take into account the conditions of their time and culture, the literary genres in use at that time, and the modes of feeling, speaking and narrating then current. "For the fact is that truth ...


3

Perspicuity probably isn't gonna be a terribly popular word in the Catholic world. The Catholic Church doesn't hold any scripture to be self-interpreting, not even the things that seem obvious; this is a safeguard to preserve one authentic teaching authority of the Church. In a document promoting unity between Christian Churches in the 1970's this difference ...


3

In the fascinating article "Catholic Sources and the Declaration of Independence," Rev. John C. Rager, S.T.D., lists some parallels between the U.S.'s Declaration of Independence and St. Robert Bellarmine's and St. Thomas Aquinas's thought. Regarding "The right to change the government," he writes: Declaration of Independence: “Whenever ...


3

Protestants trust what Paul and Luke wrote for the same reason Catholics, and all other Christians, believe what they wrote is correct: because the rest of the New Testament testifies to the veracity of what they say. Peter asserts Paul's writings are scripture in 2 Peter 3:14-16. The first several chapters of Acts are about everyone but Paul. And, from ...


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