12

This question has long been of interest to me, and I've investigated it on a number of occasions in the past -- never quite in a "scientific" way, though. This looks to be a fruitful question, even if it is one of those "opinion based" (but hopefully "good subjective") ones that are not ideal for a Q&A in the StackExchange model. Impressions My own ...


12

“Calcibus” is the ablative or dative plural of calx, which means “limestone” (from which we get the term “calcium”) or, alternatively, “heel.” I believe the translator mistook “calcibus” for “calicibus.” If we take the “limestone” meaning, based on the context, the phrase almost certainly refers to the fact that many prophets were stoned to death because ...


10

It appears that Augustine believed that purgatory was real, but didn't believe the matter was settled. His agnosticism seems clearest in this passage: It is a matter that may be inquired into, and either ascertained or left doubtful, whether some believers shall pass through a kind of purgatorial fire, and in proportion as they have loved with more or less ...


9

Gerald Bonner, in Augustine of Hippo (page 36), says, "There is no reason to suppose that he was of any but Berber stock." Mark Ellingsen writes in The Richness of Augustine (page 7) that there were three main ethnic groups in the region of Augustine's birthplace: Three significant ethnic groups populated the region: Italian immigrants; Children of ...


9

There is a certain amount of freedom within the various Christian Churches to employ or ascribe certain titles to particular saints or blessed in their own way (or traditions). The title of Doctor of the Church was first instituted officially on September 20, 1295 by pope Boniface XIII, when he accorded this title to four saints, Pope Gregory the Great ...


9

Augustine addresses this question in at least the Confessions and the City of God. In book 11 of the Confessions he deals with the subject of time extensively, and ultimately he decides that it is inherently associated with change. In City of God he writes: Time does not exist without some movement and transition, while in eternity there is no change. (11....


9

The problem with references to church fathers is that they get paraphrased from time to time. Sometimes you will just have to look in Augustine for similar terminology and see if you can find the concept alluded to. That being said this seems the closest citation I've encountered to how you worded it, in Augustine's Marriage and Virginity from the Works of ...


9

This quote does come from Augustine, but its application to the doctrine of purgatory seems to be the work of Thomas Aquinas. Aquinas (who mistakenly attributes it to Gregory the Great) quotes similar language in his second article on purgatory from the appendices of the Summa, saying: On the contrary, Gregory says, "Even as in the same fire gold ...


8

The ecclesiology of Augustine and the ecclesiology of the Reformers were both very much products of the times they lived in: In Augustine's case as well as sourcing a basic understanding on ecclesiology from scripture and tradition, any development of his thinking in this area was greatly influenced by the problems the Church had been facing - especially in ...


8

This quote is often attributed to one of the early church fathers, usually to Bernard of Clairvaux or Saint Augustine, although the earliest reference in print was in 1896. There is no historical evidence that links the quote to Clairvaux or Augustine. It is part of a textbook on human anatomy by Joseph Hyrtl


7

1,000 years before John Calvin was an idea. After His apologetic battle with Pelagius. Augustine wrote a book called On Grace and Free Will. This was necessitated by two extremes that he saw and had concluded (in agreement with all the fathers before him) that both extremes were in error and he would not be accused (as some were saying) that because of his ...


7

Two church fathers who (a) reject Origen's universal salvation and (b) are not influenced by Augustine are Basil (d. 379) and Chrysostom (d. 407). Their theological systems, however, are not nearly as well-developed as that of Augustine with respect to the interaction of divine and human will. More speculatively, Pelagius (d. 420?) may also have assumed ...


6

Luther and Augustine seem to have disagreed on: Ecclesiology Purgatory: Augustine believed it, though Luther claimed he "held nothing at all of purgatory." Sacraments: Luther claimed three sacraments, but Augustine expressly called at least six of the seven Catholic sacraments a "sacrament." The canon of scripture: even disregarding ...


6

Here is the short version of the answer: The Orthodox church believes that Augustine gave a personal tint to his theology, thus deviating from the rest of the earlier patristic fathers, especially regarding the Trinity and the nature of sin and grace. The Orthodox think Augustine was greatly influenced by neo-platonism, thus he is more "philosophical" than ...


6

Your question is interesting and it is something that I have talked about a lot Since I was part of that movement in the early 90s and left it only to eventually begin studying Early Church history and theology later. It is very difficult (possibly impossible) to find anything like the Faith and Prosperity Movement in the Early Church. While the Early ...


6

This quote from catholic.com sums up why a Catholic group considers it unorthodox pretty well: Christian Science purports to be a Christian organization. It borrows heavily from the Christian vocabulary but denies all the fundamental Christian dogmas. It rejects the belief in a personal God, the Trinity, the divinity of Christ, the existence of sin ...


6

The reference is probably to Augustine's Sermon 61, on Luke 13:21–24 – in which Jesus compares the kingdom of God to leaven in bread, and references the narrow gate. Augustine says: “The three measures of meal” of which the Lord spake, is the human race. Recollect the deluge; three only remained, from whom the rest were to be re-peopled. Noe had three sons,...


5

Though it was historically attributed to Augustine, this letter was actually written by Fulgentius of Ruspe in the early 6th century. It appears in English in volume 95 of the series The Fathers of the Church, page 59. The introduction there notes the historical context and briefly discusses the authorship debate. In answer to Peter's request [for a ...


5

The Old Testament points forward to the coming of the promised Redeemer, the Serpent-crusher of Genesis, the Prophet like Moses, the Suffering Servant of Isaiah, the Son of David, the Messiah of Daniel, and the Humble King of Zechariah. Four hundred years after God spoke to the prophet Malachi, God spoke again. The message was that the prophecy of Malachi 3:...


4

Angels and humans are not of same essence. Humans are composed of physical bodies and immortal spirits.Humans experience human death.Human death is separation of body and spirit. James 2:26 (NIV) As the body without the spirit is dead, so faith without deeds is dead. On the other hand, angels are just immortal spirits without physical bodies. ...


4

It is my understanding that "Black Africans" are sub-saharan in origin. See: Bantu Migration Theory. Look at the appearances of ancient Egyptians and whatnot. They were not black --- they considered blacks from Nubia, the country to the south of them corresponding to the far southern Nile between Egypt and Ethiopia, to be foreigners. Carthaginians were not ...


4

Augustine is found on the calendar of saints of the Orthodox Church, although some of his teachings are viewed as simply theological opinion, and these are generally rejected by the Orthodox Church. For further reading, see Father Seraphim Rose, The Place of Blessed Augustine in the Orthodox Church, from Saint Herman Press.


4

Augustine wrote hundreds of letters to priests and bishops in the Church. Many of the letters are written in response to questions that he had received from them, some of which Augustine did not necessarily think were worth his time and effort, but were a burden to address, and provide responses to: ~I have not at my disposal sufficient leisure to enter on ...


4

Yes - the wikipedia article on sola fide baldly asserts that Augustine is among the "Church Fathers whom Protestant apologists believe taught the doctrine of Sola Fide (although Catholic and Orthodox apologists quote the same fathers as supporting a justification that includes works)." Confusion in this regard, results from differing definitions of ...


4

Christian Science contains elements of four heresies that were condemned in the early Church, especially gnosticism: Gnosticism: the denial and/or denigration of the material world There is no life, truth, intelligence, nor substance in matter. All is infinite Mind and its infinite manifestation, for God is All-in-all. Spirit is immortal Truth; ...


4

I will enumerate all of Mr. G.K. Chesterton's (the man who wrote the book on Orthodoxy) differences here: It is a "purely spiritual" form of Christianity. the essential difference between Mrs. Eddy's creed and mine is that she anchors in the air, while I put an anchor where the groping race of men have generally put it, in the ground. FAITH ...


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