12

"Predestination" It is not that Arminians argue "against" predestination - that would be silly, since the term comes from Scripture; Arminians would have to cross out a whole bunch of verses in their Bibles if that were the case. Clearly "predestination" is a reality. The question is, what does that mean, and how does that work?...


12

If you do research on Calvinism, Jansenism, Pelagianism, etc., you might find the term "sufficient grace" bandied about. The trouble is, depending on who's using it, it's defined differently, which makes it a not terribly useful term. So I'll try here to clear up who uses the term and what they mean by it. Catholics and Arminians use the term "sufficient ...


11

Background Although Calvinism and Arminianism are often presented as polar opposites, they have a common heritage. Jacobus Arminius studied under Calvinist teachers and was himself a Calvinist when he began his ministry. So it's not a surprise that the two systems share a common framework. But Arminius eventually questioned some of the tenets of Calvinism, ...


10

Limited atonement brings with it the implication that not anyone can be saved by Christ - only those for whom he atoned. The language used in the Bible to describe salvation is inclusive. It is described as being presented to whosoever wills. In 1 Timothy, Paul claims that God desires all people to be saved. 1 Timothy 2:3-6 (ESV) 3  This is good,...


10

John Wesley was a five-point Arminian, but he accepted Calvinists as true Christians. He welcomed Calvinist preacher George Whitefield into the Methodist movement and sent him out to preach throughout the American colonies. In much of Wesley's own preaching he focused on the things that we have in common as Christians, but you can see examples of his ...


9

With all due respect to Mark Hausam, the logic just doesn't hold water. That sounds like a category error. Category Errors These fallacies occur because the author mistakenly assumes that the whole is nothing more than the sum of its parts. However, things joined together may have different properties as a whole than any of them do separately....


8

Because some things cannot be accomplished by the application of power. Suppose I asked you to draw a 4-sided triangle. You would presumably reply that this is impossible, because a triangle by definition has only 3 sides. Suppose I then say, Well, what if you had 10 really strong men to help? Then could you do it? Of course the logical reply is that it ...


8

The Wesleyan Arminians recognised the problem implied by your analogy and resolved it by proffering the Governmental Theory of Atonement. Applying this resolution to your analogy Christ has 'made' the payment at the cross - and He can't unmake the payment because the cost to Him was real) - but rather than a completed individual transaction on behalf of ...


8

In paragraph 480 of St. Thomas Aquinas' Commentary on the Epistle to the Hebrews, he explains that the way sacrifice was done in the past was to wipe out past sins. The people sinned, and then a priest offered an animal sacrifice in reparation for those sins. This verse states that by Christ's one sacrifice, past and future sins are being accounted for, thus ...


7

Yes, there are claims that both John and Charles Wesley were Arminians, but more often than not it is the theology of John that is under discussion. “And can it be” is a wonderful example of how Charles Wesley used hymns to present his theological views. The article in the first link below gives an interesting insight into the background and biblical basis ...


6

The doctrine of Prevenient Grace is seen by those who adhere to it as a natural outcome of sound Biblical exegesis. In one respect it's akin to the doctrine of the Trinity in that it resolves apparent discrepancies. With the Trinity, we have clear teachings in Scripture that there is only one God, other clear teachings that Jesus is God, and others ...


6

When I first read your question my immediate thought was it is not what is said here that shows the conflict with Calvinism but what is 'not said'. Interestingly enough I was trying to find proof of this impression and found the very same observation made my a modern Remonstrant with respect to the seventh article of the Methodist church. Original sin ...


6

Whether or not you'll find a theology that rejects everything in Calvinism and Arminianism is going to depend on how broadly you define those terms (as Calvinism can also encompass such issues as infant baptism, eschatology, and the relation of the OT civil law and modern day governance). But the closest you'll find (at least in matters of salvation) is ...


6

Arminius on the Church Fathers, and Orthodox Doctrine Jacob Arminius did in fact believe that his doctrines were in line with the ancient church fathers. In Arminius' Dissertation Of The Seventh Chapter of Romans, we find the following quotation: If, lastly, I shall prove that the other opinion [regeneration] as it is in these days explained by most ...


6

The strongest defenders of penal substitution are going to be conservative Calvinists: that is, those who hold to the "five points" of Calvinism and reject modernist approaches to Scripture. Outside this group, many nonetheless hold to penal substitution, but there is more diversity of opinion. A few examples of conservative Calvinists who hold to ...


5

There are a few that attempt to do so. Both Calvinists and Arminians would say that any such attempt is internally inconsistent. I don't know of any "universally acknowledged system" of theology that does so, except perhaps for Amyraldism, which denies limited atonement but affirms the other four points of Calvinism. (Any Protestant denying a point of ...


5

One of the best illustrations I have seen in support of the Arminian concept is a "Dennis the Menace" cartoon in which Dennis has a boy on the ground and is sitting on him with his fist poised to punch him in the face. The caption is, "Alright Dennis, I'll be you're best friend." Anybody who knows anything about love knows it cannot be taken, it can only ...


4

Christ is not only the propitiation for the sins of Christians: 1 John 2:1-2 (ESV) My little children, I am writing these things to you so that you may not sin. But if anyone does sin, we have an advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous. He is the propitiation for our sins, and not for ours only but also for the sins of the whole world.1 Even ...


4

John Wesley, in his explanatory notes on John 17, says, "The son of perdition signifies one that deservedly perishes; as a son of death, 2 Samuel 12:5; children of hell, Matthew 23:15, and children of wrath, Ephesians 2:3, signify persons justly obnoxious to death, hell, wrath. Psalms 109:8." To say someone deserves to perish is not the same as saying they ...


4

Arminians and other varieties of non-Calvinists reconcile the all-powerful nature of God with His allowance of free will to men, within the limits of physics he has given them, as God constrains Himself to His own purpose and character. In so keeping, it is God's character and not His power that is the 'limiting factor' in why, though it is His desire that ...


4

Baptists have historically combined the two perspectives as described in this answer. While the terms "General" and "Particular" Baptists don't have as wide a currency as they once did, they speak to the strains, as I described here: Eventually, there were two main camps of Baptists - "General" Baptists who believed in General atonement, i.e. anyone who ...


3

The idea that God draws and offers salvation to all men, not only a chosen elect, comes from passages such as John 3:16-21 (emphasis mine (note that this passage can just as easily support a Calvinist view)) - “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life. For God did not send ...


3

From http://www.theopedia.com/Arminianism Arminianism is a school of theology based on the teachings of Dutch theologian Jacob Arminius, for whom it is named. It is perhaps most prominent in the Methodist movement and found in various other evangelical circles today. It stands in contrast to Calvinism, with which it has a long history of debate. ...


3

Being impatient for answer I looked up the works of Arminias and found right away in Volume 1 - ARTICLES XIII AND XIV,  P228 that he argues against the imputation of guilt on infants. For example, among many other statements against the imputation of guilt on infants, he says (in the words of his friend) "When Adam sinned in his own person and with his ...


3

What is the Biblical argument against Limited Atonement? Proponents claim that because not everyone is saved, God could not have intended that Christ die for everyone. There is an assumption in this logic regarding God's intentions. We get an insight into God's intentions from the these verses; 1 John 2:2 And he is the propitiation for our sins: and ...


3

Arminian and Calvinist compared The Arminian and Calvinist views on Total Depravity start out with similar points. The theory of Total Depravity forms the 'T' in the Calvinist five summary points TULIP, and the T in the Arminian five summary points of FACTS. It is one area where there is some crossover within the two theories. Both Calvinists and ...


3

Reformed Theology (Calvinism) does teach that God is absolutely in control over everything, which means predetermining every tiny detail. John Piper was asked the question 'Has God Predetermined Every Tiny Detail In the Universe, Including Sin?' (video and transcript), and he begun his answer with this: Yes. There's a great quote from Spurgeon about dust ...


3

Many interpret it in light of the rest of the larger section, Romans 9-11, which indicates that Paul's language of election is about Jews and Gentiles. In fact, cutting off that section at verse 23 is quite artificial, and even the Reformed-leaning ESV translation groups 9:1-29 into a single pericope. On this interpretation, election is not a choice by God ...


3

There are several views of the covenants within the Reformed/Calvinist camp, broadly defined. The traditional view is that the covenants are unified and that the New Covenant is new in the sense of "new and improved" rather than radically new (cf. Rom. 11 for how Gentiles are grafted into the continuing tree started with Abraham and in Gal. 3 how the law ...


3

You've mentioned one of the big points of disagreement between Arminians and Calvinists regarding the interpretation of Romans 9–11 – are nations or individuals in view? Romans 9:6–24 is a crucial text in this regard. Another related point of contention is who exactly is Israel in various places, culminating in Romans 11:26 – a Jewish remnant only, the ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible