13

The source appears to be mostly St. Athanasius, who was a deacon in Alexandria at the time the Arian controversy broke out (and later the bishop of the same see). He writes in his Discourses Against the Arians (Discourse 1, Chapter 1, 4) For of the one [i.e., a certain Sotades, who apparently wrote songs] has Arius imitated the dissolute and effeminate ...


12

From Arius' own hand: We believe in one God the Father Almighty, and in the Lord Jesus Christ his son, who was begotten of him before all ages, God the Word through whom all things were made, both things in heaven and on earth; who descended, and became human, and suffered, and rose again, ascended into heaven, and will again come to judge the living and ...


11

This answer is based on the following 3 resources I found: A 2015 article Was Constantine the Great Baptized An Arian? A 2012 paper The Spread Out of Arianism. A Critical Analysis of the Arian Heresy published in the International Journal of Orthodox Theology A 2005 article How Arianism Almost Won by Christopher A. Hall published in Christian History Issue ...


11

Some background regarding Arianism To answer the question, it is important to understand that Arianism is a Trinitarian heresy that denies the divinity of the Second Person of the Trinity. Specifically, Arius held that the Son, or the Word, was created out of nothing, and that there was a time when He did not exist. The Son was, therefore, the Father’s first ...


9

In the early fourth century, many Christians were divided over how best to understand the relationship between God and Jesus. Emperor Constantine called for an ecumenical council of bishops to settle the matter: the Council of Nicea, in 325 AD. The result was a condemnation of 'the Arian heresy'. Letter to Emperor Constantine A few years later, in 327 AD, ...


7

Thomas Pearne, of Peterhouse, Cambridge, was also a Shakespeare critic. The article explores the criticism of William Shakespeare by Thomas Pearne in his book review of "Shakespeare," edited by Issac Reed and published in 1785. The review was originally serialized in the 1786 British periodical the "Monthly Review." The author compares Pearne's comments ...


6

St. Thomas Aquinas discusses various errors of Arius and his followers in his Commentary on Chapter 1 of Gospel of John that are connected to Prologue of Gospel of John. If Arius had something to say on that part of Gospel of John it is very reasonable to believe that Aquinas would mention it. Aquinas does not mention Arius in commentary on John 1:1, however ...


6

Like @curiousdannii pointed out in his comment, Arian influences do not equal an Arian viewpoint or verbatim parroting. In Qur'anic teaching, worship or veneration of anything besides God is strictly forbidden, or haram. This helps define what a Muslim (or a Christian or Jew or Sabean for that matter) can be and cannot be. "Say: 'O People of the ...


6

Fr. Hardon's Modern Catholic Dictionary gives this definition of Semi-Arianism: The teaching of certain theologians who, after the Council of Nicaea (A.D. 325), sought a compromise between Arianism and the doctrine of Christ's consubstantiality with the Father. They were led by Basil, Bishop of Ancyra, and their sympathies were toward orthodoxy, although ...


5

If I’m understanding you correctly, this is your central claim: If God’s λόγος was created, then it did not exist before it was created. The corollary is that God at one point lacked λόγος, or was ἄλογος. The Greek word ἄλογος means “without reason, logic; irrational; illogical.” Er, no. It doesn’t quite work like that. Here’s Witness theology, as I ...


5

To answer this, one must first define what Arianism is. Any denomination which holds that Jesus Christ is a subordinate entity to God. He is not one with the Father. Christ is not truly divine but a created being can be considered as 'Arian'. In Arius's words, "there was [a time] when he (the Son) was not." Holy Arian Catholic and Apostolic Church in claims ...


5

It seems to me that Newton is 'sitting on the fence' and acting as a spectator to the arguments regarding the Person and the Deity of Christ. He writes that he can observe in the early Church (due to the presence of what he calls 'Nazarenes') that two camps existed and accepted one another's presence in the early Church, so he maintains : The Nazarenes, as ...


5

The records of the 1st Ecumenical Council do not, I believe, include the discourse that preceded the condemnation against Arius and his followers. We do know, however, that Athanasius of Alexandria was key in the condemnation. He had written extensively against Arianism in his Four Discourses Against the Arians. We can assume, I think, that many or all ...


5

Yes, there appears to be a link between Socinianism and Sir Isaac Newton’s views on the Trinity. I say “appears” because Newton was careful to conceal his theology. Extracts taken from this link https://isaacnewtonstheology.files.wordpress.com/2013/06/theology-of-general-scholium.pdf present evidence from recent studies to show that Newton supported ...


4

Constantine The Great was not an Arian at all. In fact he was quite orthodox in his thought and to further this notion he is considered a saint in both the Catholic and Orthodox Churches. Regarding Eusebius of Nicomedia’s confession of faith prior to the baptism of Constantine and during the First Ecumenical Council of 325, John Karmiris writes: ...


3

Yes. As St. Alphonsus of Liguori writes in "Article 2: The Arian Heresy" §8 of his The History of Heresies p. 56: Noel Alexander says that these errors [of Arius] are taken from an impious work he wrote, called Thalia, and from an Epistle of his to St. Alexander, referred to by St. Athanasius, and from the Synodical Epistle of the Council of Nice, ...


3

First of all, there was no Arianism prior to Arius because Arianism started with Arius.Arius began to teach a new teaching. He taught that the Logos had a beginning of existence.Although some scholars like Alexander Vasiliev refers to Lucian as the Arius before Arius.This merely shows that Lucian hold onto a proto-Arianism (source). Arius was condemned ...


3

The Jehovah’s Witness religion teaches that there was a time when God was utterly alone and decided to create, as his first creation, a being known in the Bible both as the Word of God, and Michael the Archangel. Then the Word / Michael created all the other angels plus this universe and planet earth and all life on it. He is said to have been subordinate ...


3

There is no evidence that Arius was influenced by Revelation 3:14 or Psalms 8:5-6, but he appealed to Bible verses such as Jesus saying that the father is "greater than I" (John 14:28), and "The Lord created me at the beginning of his work" (Proverbs 8:22). He was also influenced by Origen. Richard Smoley says in Forbidden Faith, page 45, Origen held an ...


2

I'm not a JW, but I've gone through just about every christological position at some point in my life, so I'll give you the answer I would have given when I was an Arian. Does anyone really view the "logos" as being God's logic or reasoning faculty? Certainly Trinitarians DO NOT since they view it as a PERSON. So why would you think Arians view it as his ...


2

In the middle of the first volume of his five voluminous work on the history of Christian theology, as a Lutheran historian Jaroslav Pelikan writes, The truth, even the truth of the Gospels, is never pure and clear, and rarely simple. Jaroslav Pelikan, The Emergence of the Catholic Tradition, vol. 1, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1971, p. 266. It ...


2

The most complete collection of texts on Arianism I know of is listed on the FCC website, but they are Mostly letters from and to Arian Auxentius. Most of the texts have links in the translation column. The online book "Arianism: Historical and Theological Reassessments: Papers from The Ninth Century" contains source texts and commentary on the liturgy ...


2

There appears to be a misapprehension of what the Trinity actually teaches. So that to answer some of the questions here posed would be to implicity accept as true something never posited for belief. For instance, What proof does anyone have that Christ was the same and identical as the one He called "Father" No trinitarian Christian believes that ...


2

To answer this question properly, we must begin by clarifying the terms of discussion. The doctrine of the Trinity, properly speaking, does not touch upon the subject of the incarnation (i.e. the Word of God having become flesh - John 1:14) or of anything relating to Christ's human nature. It only deals with the nature of the Godhead per se, and teaches that ...


1

The Jehovah's Witnesses believe that Jehovah God has existed from eternity past, and that around a few billion years ago he created a Son, a god (Jn 1:1 NWT) named Michael the Archangel (Is Jesus the Archangel Michael? Watchtower 10 4/1 p. 19), who existed in God's form (Phil 2:6 NWT) as the exact representation of Jehovah's very being (Heb 1:3 NWT). ...


1

Arius was a 4th century priest in Alexandria, Egypt. He denied the deity of the Son of God, holding that Jesus was created by God as the first act of creation and that the nature of Christ was anomoios (“unlike”) that of God the Father. Arianism is the view that Jesus is a finite created being with some divine attributes, but He is not eternal and not ...


1

Muslims are not Arians They do not believe God became a man. They do not believe Jesus to be God. They also do not believe that the Holy Spirit is a separate God from the Father. They do not give religious praise to Jesus, for they only give such to God. They believe Jesus is the Son of God, or in this case, Allah. They believe God was the one to send ...


1

Islam is as opposed to Arianism as it is to orthodox Christian teaching on the person of Christ and his relationship with God. That is why Islam makes no distinction between modern-day Arians (such as the Jehovah’s Witnesses) and the bulk of Christian denominations that eschew Arianism. They all believe in God as “Father” and as Christ as “the Son of God” ...


1

The earlier fathers did sometimes make statements that later came to be recognized as formally heretical. But since no one called them on those statements during their lifetimes, we didn't get to see the debate play out. They didn't have a chance to say, "Oh yeah... good point," and explain, revise or qualify their statements. And on the negative side, they ...


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