19

It's very easy to look back thousands of years, once time has had plenty of time to change things, and say that there's no evidence for something and so it must be false. But it's a very different matter when there aren't thousands of years in the way. The Gospels were written in the first century AD, by people who experienced it personally, to their ...


15

Douglas Boin addresses the two main reasons given for the lack of archaeological evidence of Christianity during the period in question: Theological: Christians applied a Biblical prohibition on idols to "Christian" objects Economics: Christians were from the lowest class and couldn't afford to make these objects In addition to evidence attributed to ...


13

The Wailing Wall was not part of the Temple - it was part of the Temple Mount - and a giant retaining wall for the courtyard on which the Temple sat. Here is a model of what we think it would have all looked like: Basically, when Herod restored the Second Temple, he couldn't expand the building itself, since it's dimensions were fixed by Scripture. He ...


13

Minor clarification. While the Temple of Jerusalem was destroyed in 70AD, the city of Jerusalem retained its general street plan until 135 AD. In 135 AD, after the Bar Jakova Revolt, the already damaged city was razed to the ground. In its place, a Greek city called Aelia Capitolina was put in its place. As such, when Constantine's mother, Helena visited ...


13

Bible critics questioned the existence of Pontius Pilate, the Roman governor of Judea who handed Jesus over to be impaled. (Matthew 27:1-26) Evidence that Pilate was once ruler of Judea is etched on a stone discovered at the Mediterranean seaport city of Caesarea in 1961. Inscribed on the stone is: Pontius Pilatus, Prefect of Judea, has dedicated to the ...


11

Not a person, but an entire people: Critics believed for a long time that the Hittites, spoken of in the Old Testament, never actually existed, due to a complete lack of evidence of a civilization that the OT hints was a great power for its day. All that changed in the 19th century when a series of archaeological investigations began uncovering ruins of the ...


10

A very striking example is Belshazzar, the king spoken of in the book of Daniel. It was he who commanded that the gold and silver vessels which had been taken back to Babylon from the Temple in Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar be removed from storage so that he, "his princes, his wives, and his concubines" could drink from them. So they drank wine, and ...


9

Some commentators (such as the Institute for Creation Research) have suggested that Leviathan (otherwise a Hapax Legomenon) in Job 41 is a dinosaur. Not all agree, but it is at least "out there" as a theory. Prior to the 1820s, dinosaurs were unknown to (modern) man[1], so it is not surprising the are not mentioned in the Bible. (Indeed, the term would have ...


9

Why is there no archaeological evidence that Christians existed for 200 years after 70 AD? This is historically not true. To say there is no archaeological evidence that Christians existed for 200 years after the year 70 AD is absolutely baffling to the mind. There may not be a huge amount of archaeological proofs, but they do exist nevertheless. The Book ...


8

The consensus of modern scholarship is well described in the wikipedia article to which the question refers. Most scholars are committed to a view that the Old Testament for the most part contains myth possibly to bolster/justify Jewish claims on the land of Israel. Many are also committed to the Wellhausen Documentary Hypothesis or similar derivatives. ...


8

Boy is that wikipedia article riddle with citation needed around the part mentioning Joseph. The thing that points to Joseph being of the Hyksos, looks to be what I thought was the best evidence against it. If you didn't think of this yourself, permit me to state the obvious, The evidence is in where the bones went. Joseph wanted his bones buried where ...


8

In addition to the various other roles that Missouri has in LDS history and teachings (see What is the LDS meaning of the New Jerusalem?), it is believed by most to be the location of the Garden of Eden. The LDS basis for this belief is founded largely on the teachings of Joseph Smith in the context of Doctrine & Covenants section 57 which reads that ...


8

To answer your question, I would challenge you to learn as much about the American continent as you can for the date that the Book of Mormon was compiled (~400AD). You will quickly discover that there are no other surviving records from that time period at all.1 In fact, the oldest manuscript written in the Americas known by historians–the Dresden Codex–was ...


7

Since there was only one set of plates, we could never expect to find direct archaeological evidence of them, as they are now in angelic custody. However, there ought to be indirect evidence that suggests their likely existence, and that is all this question can seek. The Book of Mormon points to a highly literate culture that existed in the Americas for ...


7

Lita Cosner and Robert Carter (Creation.com) say: First, we find it rather curious that this site is being used as if it’s something that should be a big challenge to creationists because of the date. Our response to that is the same as the dates that put the earliest Egyptian pyramids before the biblical date for the Flood and those that claim dinosaurs ...


6

As an archaeologist of Central Europe and adherent of processual paradigm, I'd argue that it's (almost) impossible to prove existence of a person archaeologically. But here we can join study of historical texts with archaeology and ignore the boundaries between these two disciplines. Archaeology itself without aid of written texts can say very little on ...


6

Tradition holds that Moses lived sometime around the 15th century B.C. This would put the oldest use of the tetragrammaton (the Hebrew word "YHWH", anglicized to "Yahweh") to the same time frame, as Moses wrote the oldest portions of the Bible. Outside the Bible, the oldest known inscription of the tetragrammaton appears on the Mesha stele, which has been ...


6

When God commissioned Moses from the burning bush in the wilderness, when Moses asked God his name he was given the name of Yahweh, Exodus 3:13-14: And Moses said unto God, Behold, when I come unto the children of Israel, and shall say to them, The God of your fathers has sent me to you; and they shall say to me, What is his name? what shall I say to ...


5

Well, there are still no records of Joseph himself. From an objective perspective, these Hyksos could only be considered proof of the possibility of Joseph, not of Joseph himself. Yes, there is a record which says that it is quite possible that the stories of Genesis and Exodus represents some sort of mytho-symbolic truth, but that does not mean that the ...


5

The lack of evidence of early Christianity has been noted by many scholars. Edward Gibbon, in The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, said :"The scanty and suspicious materials of ecclesiastical history seldom enable us to dispel the dark cloud that hangs over the first age of the church.". William Fitzgerald, in Lectures on ...


4

For the New Testament, yes. Though Wikipedia may not be a "scholarly" source I find it good for this sort of thing. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biblical_manuscript#Listings Also, in at least the UBS and NA, there is a list of manuscripts used to compile the "Greek New Testament." I think that the BHS contains something somewhat similar for the Hebrew ...


4

The most common response of conservative Christians is to attempt to refute the evidence of archaeology. 1 Kings 6:1 places the Exodus from Egypt approximately 1440 BCE, because this verse dates the Exodus 480 years before the fourth year of Solomon's reign, and the Bible dates this year of Solomon's reign at 960 BCE. This would place the Battle of Jericho ...


4

We have a great deal of evidence for the histricity of the Book of Mormon but nothing comparable to what exists in support of the Bible. This is because archaeology in the Middle East is far in advance of archaeology in mesoamerica. The arid sands of the Middle East are an ideal environment for the preservation of artifacts. The humid Central American ...


4

The original Hebrew term is yam suph, and the correct English translation is Sea of Reeds, as explained by this article: The translation "Red Sea" is simply a traditional translation introduced into English by the King James Version through the second century BC Greek Septuagint and the later Latin Vulgate. It is possible that this "Sea of Reeds" was ...


4

Today, as well as in ancient times, it depends on where you are. A grave example is Romania. Under Ceaucescu the country underwent a forced industrialization that resulted in people flooding the cities. To make room they tore down houses and built high-rises. But as apartments (generally) was small etc. dogs were left on the streets where they was left to ...


4

Yes. 29 homilies of Origen were discovered in 2012 in the Bavarian State Library in Germany. Some of them were already available in Latin translation, but others were completely new discoveries. Origen scholar Lorenzo Perrone judged them to be genuine. In 2015 the homilies were published in a critical edition, the front matter of which is available on ...


4

In a tomb at Ketef Hinnom in Israel, the oldest text of the Hebrew Bible was discovered. The text, inscribed on a silver scroll in the old Hebrew script dating to the 7th Century B.C., is the Aaronic blessing (Numbers 6:24-26), which begins, "yeverekh'kha YHWH Vayishmarekha" (May Yahweh bless you and keep you). Source: http://ancient-hebrew.org/...


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