14

In essence you are asking an epistemological question: How can one side "know" that it is correct in a theological debate? The question could just as well apply to any Christian body, let alone the Eastern Orthodox Church. Within the eastern Church exists a notion called prelest. It is a Russian word that basically means "deception", but it is a kind of ...


13

According to the Catholic Church, the short answer is that he never lost it. In fact, in the strict sense, Martin Luther never participated in apostolic succession to begin with. Apostolic succession refers to the fact that all bishops can trace their holy orders all the way back to the Apostles. That is, the Apostles ordained certain men bishops (or what ...


13

I am not really satisfied with any of the answers given here, because they do not seem to answer the question. First of all, apostolic succession refers to the fact that all bishops (that is, all those who have received the fullness of Holy Orders) can trace their Holy Orders all the way back to the Apostles. (See Catechism of the Catholic Church [CCC] 77-...


11

Apostolic succession and Papal succession are not one and the same. Is the nature of apostolic succession meant to be an unbroken succession of valid popes? No. Rather the nature of apostolic succession is meant to be an unbroken succession of valid bishops. Not just the pope, but all Catholic bishops have unbroken apostolic succession. In other words, ...


8

The Catholic Church teaches that Apostolic Succession is necessary because it was instituted by the original Apostles. Other denominations claims are similar. From the Catholic Encyclopedia: It remains to consider whether the so-called "monarchical" episcopate was instituted by the Apostles. Besides establishing a college of presbyter-bishops, did ...


8

The same way that the Catholics do. Anglicans consider themselves catholic and reformed. The Anglican church was the Catholic Church in England until the reformation when they stopped recognizing the authority of the Pope. "The roots of the Church of England go back to the time of the Roman Empire when Christianity entered the Roman province of ...


6

You would have the succession, since the Pope would be the valid successor to his predecessor. So there is no break in succession. But the Church would be limping, as it were, until its proper order is restored. You don't need a Pope to be Catholic; it's just that Christ instuted the Church with a Pope, and so it is definitional to the heirarchical structure ...


6

Protestants are not generally against the idea of certain individuals having been called and gifted by God to exercise authority over a local assembly of believers, nor a hierarchy within that assembly, nor even a limited regional hierarchy within a denomination. If this authority were what the idea of apostolic succession detailed there would be little ...


5

I believe that Catholic Hierarchy is currently the best tool for showing apostolic succession. Keep in mind that written records only exist going back to the Renaissance, and they get spottier as we go back in history. However, looking at (for example) the page for Cardinal Timothy Dolan of New York, scrolling down past the “events” table and “micro-data ...


5

Up until the time of the Reformation, the line of apostolic succession is the same between the Church of England and Roman Catholicism. The English Reformation initially had more in common with the historic schisms* than with other iterations of the Reformation, though through the influence of Thomas Cranmer, the first post-Reformation Archbishop of ...


5

Yes a number of churches other than the Roman Catholic Church believe in the Apostolic succession. A good example is the Church of England, which also follows the commonly accepted definition of Protestant (though it considers itself somewhat different from most other Protestant churches, largely because of the belief in Apostolic Succession). Specifically ...


5

I won't be able to give a complete answer as I'm not that familiar with the Catholic and Orthodox church structure, but Biblical church structure is something I've been looking into recently so here is what I've found out. The Pope I believe the argument for having one man overseeing the entire church comes from Jesus statement to Peter in Matthew 16:18 "...


4

Christ gave St. Peter the "power of the keys" to bind or loose. Addressing the question of "Whether priests alone have the keys?," St. Thomas Aquinas writes: There are two kinds of key. One reaches to heaven itself directly, by remitting sin and thus removing the obstacles to the entrance into heaven; and this is called the key of "order." Priests ...


4

John Calvin, whose theology heavily influenced every Reformer (here I exclude the Anabaptists and other such groups), has a chapter in his Institutes of the Christian Religion which discusses the clergy generally, and has some paragraphs on the ordination of clergy. I suggest you read the entire chapter for better context (and the entire book for good ...


4

One concept of Apostolic Succession, sometimes called "tactile succession", is that bishops derive their position by being consecrated by other bishops, who were themselves consecrated by earlier bishops, and so on right back to the apostles, and so to Christ Himself. A valid bishop is someone in this chain. A valid priest is someone appointed by a valid ...


4

I don't have any documents to show you, but I do want to point out some linguistic aspects to this question that can lead to confusion. In English, the word priest comes from a contraction of the word presbyter. In other languages, the word used for Catholic priests today is the word presbyter, so this question as worded doesn't really work in an early ...


4

First of all, the Catholic Church admits that both Rome and Antioch (Orthodox) have a line of succession starting with St. Peter. Speaking of the apostolic succession of Antioch, the Catholic Encyclopedia says : "The first Bishop of Antioch after St. Peter..." [...] Evodius Second of all, the Orthodox Church, which is not in union with the ...


3

Instances of popes being involuntarily deposed by conquering sovereigns and replaced with one sympathetic to that conqueror. A specific example is need to answer this question. See below. Instances of contention over the papacy by two or even three popes simultaneously, accompanied by multiple colleges of cardinals and bishoprics. Ah, the Great Schism. At ...


3

Paul says that he received his calling direct from God and not from man (flesh and blood), then went to Arabia, then Damascus and met Peter only after a further three years, in which he had already taken on the role of the apostle to the gentiles: Galatians 1:15-18: But when it pleased God, who separated me from my mother's womb, and called me by his ...


3

There is no contradiction to the claims Joseph Smith made. The Holy Ghost is the convincing power of God unto [them] of the truth of the Gospel (from Joseph Smith quote) Cornelius and other's in the house felt the Holy Ghost witness to them of the truth. Verse 47 tells us that they felt the convincing power of God and Peter feels like there should now ...


3

Christ gave the power of "binding and loosing" to Peter alone with this saying; however, a little while later He also told all the apostles: Amen, I say to you, whatever you bind on earth shall be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on earth shall be loosed in heaven. (Matthew 18:18) Similarly, Paul states that All this is from God, who has ...


3

Gee, so many posts by people who have so little knowledge of this absolutely crucial matter (crucial for churches with sacramental theology --seven ecumenical councils, seven sacraments, visible church / hierarchy of bishops, priests and deacons). What is apostolic succession? TO clarify the term: apostolic succession has nothing to do with unity with the ...


3

An apostle is, per the Greek ἀποστέλλω (apostollow) - that is, sent out. It is a job, not necessarily a title. Jesus, in the Great Commission of Matthew 28, literally apostolt (ie commissioned and sent out) all of his followers by telling them: Go ye therefore into all the world... While Matthew 28:16 says there were only 11 people there (all his ...


3

To answer the question, no the early church did not reject "apostolic succession". But to understand the answer, it is necessary to define exactly what the question is; what precisely is "apostolic succession"? For the early church, it meant "teach the same as apostles". It did not mean, what it came to be later redefined as, some sort of sacerdotal ...


3

Another answer has already cited Irenaeus (130-202). The passage cited from Against Heresies - III.III.1 - appears as a reference in Pope Paul VI' Encyclical, Dogmatic Constitution on Divine Revelation: Dei Verbum, which itself is quoted in the Vatican Catechism entry on the subject (I.I.II.75-77). Tertullian (c 155-240), a contemporary of Irenaeus also ...


3

Firstly, lets acknowledge that a lot of Protestants do practice apostolic succession, including the Anglicans, which is how some of their priests are able to be accepted as Catholic Clergy, but also Presbyterians, Lutherans, Methodists, and more. But many Protestants, including people who belong to such denominations, would say that while it is helpful for ...


2

There must be a perpetual line of successors of St. Peter. The First Vatican Council defined (Pastor Æternus ch. 2) the dogma that there will be a perpetual line of successors of St. Peter, the first pope: If, then, any should deny…that blessed Peter should have a perpetual line of successors in the Primacy over the universal Church…: let him be anathema.Si ...


2

The early overlap in the three offices was primarily between bishop (ἐπίσκοπος - episkopos) and presbyter (or "priest", "elder"; πρεσβύτερος - presbyteros). "In the Apostolic writings," writes Russian Orthodox Protopresbyter Michael Pomazanski, "the two names of 'bishop' and 'presbyter' are not always distinguished." Thus, according to the book of Acts ...


2

The first century writing known as the Didache only mentions apostles, or missionaries. However, Paul's use of the Greek term for deacon ('servant') indicates that this office dates from the early years of Christianity. Commentators continue to debate whether the role of priest also arose during the apostolic era. Certainly, the Shepherd of Hermas talks of '...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible