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Yes! Errr... NO! There are three competing theories on this. Jesus went to Hell with the damned. Jesus went to paradise in Hades Jesus went to heaven. All of these beliefs are based on a few critical verses. Verse 1: 1 Peter 3:18-20 In 1 Peter 3:18-20 (NIV), we see: 18 For Christ also suffered once for sins, the righteous for the unrighteous, to ...


14

The two are not contradictory at all. The common understanding is that Jesus is unique and the only begotten son of God. The rest of us are heirs to God - children of God via adoption. From Adopted Children of God The term “Son of God” refers preeminently to Jesus Christ’s deity (Matt. 11:25-27; 16:16-17). He alone is one in substance and glory with ...


13

Piotr Ashwin-Siejkowski in his book, The Apostles's Creed: and its Early Christian Context, argues that Pilate was specifically mentioned primarily in order to argue for and defend the humanity and real death of Jesus. He first emphasizes the historical importance of Pilate to Christianity: Certainly the Scriptural detail that Jesus of Nazareth was ...


13

The wording of that creed has caused confusion among untold thousands of people over the past millennium and across scores of languages. For as much consternation as it has spawned, the intended meaning is really very simple. The word catholic in the a Apostle's Creed is being used as an adjective, not a proper name! A quick English dictionary search will ...


12

Latter-day Saints reject the doctrines of the Trinity as taught by most Christian churches today. These creeds were canonized in the fourth and fifth centuries A.D. and do not reflect the thinking or beliefs of the New Testament church.1 That said there isn't too much with the Apostles Creed(in bold) that LDS beliefs differ from. I believe in God, the ...


11

First, it's important to understand that a biblical understanding of hell is not as cut and dry as we might like it to be. That's another discussion. Second, the Nicene creed, which is most widely used creed across Catholic, Orthodox and Protestant, simply says: he suffered death and was buried. with no mention of hell. Third, any orthodox (that's ...


10

Jehovah’s Witnesses beliefs kind of line up with the text of the Apostle’s Creed, but their interpretation of it largely diverges from common trinitarian interpretations. Here is the ELLC translation of the Apostles’ Creed, phrase by phrase: I believe in God, the Father almighty, Watchtower teaches that God is omnipotent and omniscient​, but not ...


9

A satisfactory answer requires that we examine the development of the Apostles' Creed through history. We'll deal with the question in three parts: Does today's version match that of the apostles? Does any version come from the apostles? When did today's version first appear? Does the current form of the creed come from the apostles? The strongest ...


9

It was a creed that was developed by the early church. It came into existence after the age of the apostles. However, it finds its biblical basis in the apostles. The Theopedia article says "its current form" is "more likely post-Nicene Creed in the early 4th Century AD." The Wikipedia article indicates it was a later form of the Old Roman Creed. The ...


8

Swedenborg himself had no problems with the Apostles' Creed and he did address it in his writings. It is to be observed, that in the Apostles’ Creed it is said, “I believe in God the Father, in Jesus Christ, and in the Holy Spirit”; in the Nicene Creed, “I believe in one God, the Father, in one Lord Jesus Christ, and in the Holy Spirit,” thus only ...


8

YES, He did. 1 Peter 3:19-20 (NIV) 19 After being made alive, he went and made proclamation to the imprisoned spirits— 20 to those who were disobedient long ago when God waited patiently in the days of Noah while the ark was being built. In it only a few people, eight in all, were saved through water, Those disobedient spirits are obviously in ...


7

For the larger context of the authorship and development of the creed, please see my answer to this question: Did the Apostles' Creed originate with the Apostles? Church historian Philip Schaff provides a summary of the development of the Apostles' Creed in his book, The Creeds of Christendom. A helpful table, showing the creed's gradual formation in the ...


7

There is a fundamental misunderstanding here. The original word which is translated "church" in the English scriptures did not refer to a building. It referred to the community of believers. In New Testament times there were no buildings dedicated to Christian worship so the word could not have referred to it. The English word 'church' did not always refer ...


6

As a Big 'C' Catholic I'd have to disagree with Caleb's post on principle. But no holy wars or anything, I promise. Catholics, like some Protestant congregations, truly consider themselves the Universal Church. Unlike other Protestant congregations however, we do not consider non-Catholics (or not-us'es) to not be Christians. But, when Catholics say ...


6

Like many other non-trinitarian groups, Oneness Pentecostals tend to be hesitant to align themselves too closely with any ancient creed, even one like the Apostles' Creed that is less clearly trinitarian than others (like the Nicene or Athanasian creeds). Still, some, like Steve Joel Moffett, apparently find trinitarianism within the creed: [The] common ...


5

Christadelphian beliefs impact on their view of the Apostle’s Creed, though that Creed is not something mentioned much (if at all) in their literature. Their literature does make it clear how antagonistic they are towards all the fundamental doctrines of what they call ‘Christendom’, so that we can conclude they would never subscribe to that Creed. To ...


5

On the contrary, the word "church" does appear in the Scriptures, and in a meaning completely congruent with the idea of "the church universal". Initially, it appears that congregations of "followers of the Way" - as Christians were called early on - gathered in individual houses; it wasn't until perhaps the early third century that buildings began to be ...


4

Emanuel Swedenborg (1688–1772) made several references to the Apostles' Creed in his theological writings, none of them negative. In general, he saw it as supporting his beliefs and teachings by demonstrating that they were held to among the earliest Christians. The more substantive references to the Apostles' Creed come late in his theological works, as ...


4

Wayne Grudem is probably the most prominent theologian who has provided a detailed argument on this topic.1 He first disputes the common interpretations of five passages: Acts 2:27, Romans 10:6–7, Ephesians 4:8–9, 1 Peter 3:18–20, and 1 Peter 4:6, and argues that none of them clearly teach any form of the "descent into hell" doctrine. He then proceeds to ...


4

Wikipedia has a good article on the concept. The phrase means that Christians are united in the Body of Christ, a teaching based on 1 Corinthians 12 (and some other passages).


4

First, be careful with your statement "The Christian understanding that everyone was born with origin[al] sin". Yes, this is a common Christian belief, and it is indeed a Catholic one, but it is not universal. This is irrelevant to the rest of your question, but worth noting. And yes, there does indeed exist the idea that Jesus descended into "Hell" between ...


3

This will take a bit of work...But thankfully, the work has already been done :) If you go to Volume 2 of Charles Hodge's Systematic Theology, p 591, you will there see a pretty good treatment of Christ's Death and Burial. (Search for "Christ humbled Himself even unto death, and continued under the power of death for a time." minus the quotes in the pdf) ...


3

Abel was the first to offer sacrifice pleasing to God. cf. You Shall Worship One God: The Mystery of Loving Sacrifice in Salvation History by Fr. Philippe, O.P., ch. 1, §"Sacrifice Before the Law" Adam did offer sacrifice (to offer sacrifice as part of our nature), but it seems it was not pleasing to God on account of his Original Sin. According to St. ...


2

First, the Creed does not say Pilate killed Jesus. As you point out in your question, there was plenty of blame to go around for Jesus' death. Biblically, we (i.e., you and me and every person who ever lived) are partly to blame. Let's also not forget that God the Father . . . did not spare His own Son, but delivered Him up for us all . . .. This ...


2

The "Communion of Saints", (stated in the Apostles Creed), in reading the passages in 1 Corinthians 12, seems to mean the sharing of those spiritual gifts afforded us from the Holy Spirit to strengthen and complete the body of believers who make up the church. Although God could create one individual who might possess all the spiritual gifts, our Father, ...


2

I regret I was unable to find any information on how Oneness Pentecostals view the Apostles’ Creed, although I did find a booklet written by the Rev. Wm. H. Carey – How Many Is God? It was revised in 2008 and copyright belongs to Lighthouse Ministries. Unfortunately, I could not find any link to the article. In it, he explains why Oneness Pentecostals ...


2

I think that the other answer you received, though it contains useful information, gives a misleading overall impression. Latter-day Saints don't use the Apostles' Creed, simply because it's not part of the revealed canon of Scripture. Most LDS are unaware it exists. (There are some more 'traditional' Christian churches which take a similar position on the ...


2

It is true that orthodox Christian denominations uphold the Trinity doctrine and denominations that reject the Trinity are considered to be outside of orthodox Christianity. That would include Jehovah's Witnesses and Latter Day Saints who deny that the Trinity is biblical. A June 2015 Watchtower article said that all Trinitarian churches that do not ...


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