27

God and Stephen Hawking, by John C. Lennox, is a popular direct reply to The Grand Design. Alister McGrath calls it "a brilliant response," and the book won an Award of Merit in Christianity Today's 2012 Book Awards. Whether it "makes sense," as you say, to Hawking, is perhaps debatable. But Lennox is no slouch: he's a Professor at Oxford University, ...


26

There are many reasons why Catholics practice Marian devotion. One reason, given by Catholic Pam Brink, is that “If I ignore Mary, I am being disrespectful to Jesus”. Catholic apologist David MacDonald makes the same argument in Why do Catholics pray to Mary?: Is it not disrespectful to someone not to honour his mother? Another reason David gives is that, ...


22

Some background: what Purgatory is, and what it is not Before answering the question, it is necessary to understand exactly what the Church means by “Purgatory.” The Catechism of the Catholic Church (CCC) says the following: 1030. All who die in God's grace and friendship, but still imperfectly purified, are indeed assured of their eternal salvation; but ...


19

Theologically and historically the veneration of Mary is inseparably linked to an orthodox understanding of the Incarnation. The Council of Ephesus affirmed St. Cyril's defense of the earlier fathers' use of the term Mother of God -- in St. Cyril's account this is an important part of avoiding "the fallacy of speaking of two sons": The Word's becoming ...


14

Ravi Zacharias is a renown apologist for the Christian faith. I, too, enjoy listening to him. His account of his interview with the Grand Mufti of the Islam faith, which he describes as perhaps the most tension-fraught interview he has ever conducted, is unforgettable. Since Mr. Zacharias is an astute apologist, I am guessing that his phrase "Intent is ...


14

From what I recall, the major impact of the Dead Sea Scrolls is that it validated the accuracy of the Hebrew Old Testament scriptures. Prior to the discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls, the earliest Hebrew manuscripts of the Old Testament were dated around 920 A.D. The Dead Sea Scrolls date back to around 100 B.C. With this gap of about a thousand years, ...


12

Short answer: We don't know for sure. The rest of this answer explores various "Christian answers", but the conclusion is "we don't know for sure". This is a question that I struggled with when I was an atheist, and it's a question that Christians have grappled with and that has never been answered in a way that would have been intellectually satisfying to ...


12

Mary is totally integral to our faith. She is the Mediatrix of All Graces!* She is the Cause of our Joy! She is the Singular Vessel of Devotion! I think you'd have a more productive time talking about Mary with Protestants than avoiding her. She didn't say "All generations would call me a schmo for letting God walk all over me". She said: All ...


12

You might like to take a look at the related questions What does the Bible have to say about dinosaurs? and Are Dinosaurs mentioned in the Bible? for some dinosaur-specific ideas; and Do Catholics consider Job to be historical? for, well, exactly what the question title says. Job is a bit of a tricky book in many ways. It is certainly held up as a ...


12

That professor hasn't read the Bible, apparently. Eyewitness Account Luke 1:1-4 (my translation) Inasmuch as many have undertaken to compose a narrative of the things which have taken place among us, (even as it was handed on to us by those who were eyewitnesses from the beginning, and those who tended to [the matter of preserving] an account), it seemed ...


12

For mainstream Christian denominations (including Roman Catholics, Eastern Orthodox, mainline Protestants, and Evangelicals), Resurrection is NOT the key to Jesus's identity. Rather, the resurrection shows the VICTORY of Jesus over the power of death due to His obedience to God the Father. If you read the four Gospels, the speeches in the book of Acts, and ...


11

You are not the first person in history to make such observations. One person who articulated it well is the late Clive Staples: "I believe in Christianity as I believe that the sun has risen. Not only because I see it, but because by it I see everything else." -- C.S. Lewis Another man, circa the same erra and place, who argued emphatically that ...


11

According to the doctrine of the Trinity, Jesus being the Son of God means that He is fully God made manifest in human form (John 1:14). Jesus is simultaneously both fully God and fully man. As such, Jesus being crucified wasn't God sending someone else to be pusnished, but instead God taking the punishment Himself. This, therefore, does not compromise God'...


10

Opponents to the KJV-Only position generally don’t disparage the King James Version (KJV) or treat it as necessarily inferior to contemporary English translations, but instead point out that it faces many of the same challenges and errors that face any English translation. Depending on the opponent you ask, each will probably tell you one of any number of ...


10

Caleb mentions some great names. C.S. Lewis and G.K. Chesterston are good theologian philosophers who, I think, argue a strong rational support of Christianity. Cornelius Van Til is another good one, who, I believe, argues that apart from God, there is no rational basis for rationality. This kind of gets to Andrew Leach's comment; I don't disagree ...


10

The answer to your question is really quite simple. God said that what He created was very good indeed (or really good, or better than good) prior to the fall of man and woman. With the fall of our first parents, both they and the world they inhabited were spoiled permanently. Paul wrote that ". . . the creation was subjected to futility, not willingly,...


10

One argument of the Christian presuppositional apologists is that only the Bible is self-authenticating. Other sacred texts, like the Quran, are not. Consider the way Ten Bruggencate's tract on Islam addresses the issue. To Muslims who claim that they could not be wrong, he presents "contradictions in [their] source of knowledge"; that is, he claims that ...


10

I'm going to preface this by reminding the community that whether or not a theory is true is off-topic. What is taught is what's at hand, and also what's asked. The following is only addressing what is asked: "What reasons are given". Refrain from debates over what is more "plausible", please. Unlike skeptics, Christians are willing to believe in the ...


8

Regarding your first question, there is a key difference between your two examples. They would be more parallel if you framed the first one like this: God is the most perfect possible being that can be thought of. Non-existence or a lack of regular competition in barbecuing championships would be an imperfection. Therefore, God exists and regularly ...


8

Claims There are no sources that claim Moses and Sargon of Akkad are the same person, but many sources do claim that the stories are similar enough to suggest one borrowing from the other. The most notable being that the information we have about Sargon places him in a basket sent down a river, just as Exodus does with Moses. Similarities between the Neo-...


8

וַיְהִי יְהוָה אֶתּ־יְהוּדָה And the LORD was with Judah וַיֹרֶשׁ אֶת־הָהָר and he took possession of the hill [country] ...כִּ֣י לֹא לְהוֹרִישׁ אֶת־יֹשְׁבֵי הָעֵמֶק but he could not drive out those living in the valley... The pronoun "he" in the final line is of interest. In fact, the Hebrew has no pronoun, nor does it have a form of "could". ...


8

Its hard to understand why you should think for a minute that Jesus taught anyone to follow any other god than the God of the Jewish Tanakh (ie the Old Testament). If you can add to your question to show how Jesus's teaching differs from the Tanakh then that would be helpful. As far as the Christian is concerned nothing Jesus taught contradicts the Tanakh, ...


7

Yes, your arguments are correct. Here is some expansion and support… The first and best answer to suffering is the freewill defense. For God to make free creatures is worthwhile; truly free creatures are able to act for good or evil. People who cannot do certain things are not truly free. A person needs no other response, but other responses are available ...


7

The question is based on a false premise, that omnipotence means the ability to do anything. Rather omnipotence means posessing infinite power: almighty or infinite in power, as God. having very great or unlimited authority or power. source Having infinite power does not give one the ability to do anything. It only gives them the ability to do ...


7

Why can the Catholic Church not simply ignore the Virgin Mary? Why can it not simply drop Marian devotion altogether? That is like asking the question, Why did God not decide to become incarnate by another means? Why did He pass through Mary? Surely God is omnipotent, and thus can do anything that He wills. So why did He come to us through Mary? ...


7

Speaking as a Protestant, I suggest that one of the main "sticking points"--if not the sticking point--between the Protestant and Catholic perspectives on the personhood of Mary can be traced to our differing perspectives on Holy Scripture. Generally speaking, Protestants (and particularly Evangelical Protestants, of whom I am one) consider the Holy Bible ...


7

There's a lot of baggage that comes with belief, but it's simple to explain: God exists and he is pure spirit God made Angels which are pure spirit Some Angels are good Some Angels are bad God made the world God made people with a body and a spirit Humanity's ability to comprehend this ends at "people with a body". Philosophers can come up with the rest ...


7

Jesus is Risen All of Christianity rests on the resurrection of Jesus from the dead. If He is indeed risen, then He is indeed the Christ, the Son of God. From this, it follows that the Christian God is, in fact, the true God. Paul affirmed this in his opening statement to the Romans: Paul, a bond-servant of Christ Jesus, called as an apostle, set ...


7

Local-flood proponents generally fall into one of two camps: That the narrative is told from the point of view of the author, and from the author's point of view, the flood covered the entire (known) earth. (One example). In this view, I believe the only logical explanation for your question would be that God's promise was taken to mean that this would not ...


7

While how much philosophy has influenced the church on this can be debated, one only has to look to Scripture to see that God clearly operates outside time. The term "outside time" may mean different things to people. To to clarify I'm saying that in order to be considered outside time one must display the ability to Control time. Independent of time, ...


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