28

In Amos 8, the prophet declares (NIV trans.): 11 “The days are coming,” declares the Sovereign Lord, “when I will send a famine through the land— not a famine of food or a thirst for water, but a famine of hearing the words of the Lord. 12 People will stagger from sea to sea and wander from north to east, searching for the word of the Lord, but ...


18

Wikipedia does a good job of summarizing the heresy, but I want to pull out some source material. Some of the sayings do attest to the synpotic Gospels, but there is a lot of heresy in there too: From the top, selected parts of The Gospel of Thomas: These are the secret sayings that the living Jesus spoke and Didymos Judas Thomas recorded. 1. And he ...


18

When Jesus said that the scribes and Pharisees would be charged for the murder of all the prophets, that is, from Abel to Zechariah, he indicated what he considered to be the Hebrew canon. He was speaking according to the traditional Jewish canon, in which Chronicles is listed as the last book and in which Zechariah is killed at 2 Chronicles 24:20, 21. Luke ...


12

Neither of your options is correct. Catholics typically refer to what Protestants call the Apocrypha (1-2 Macabees, Sirach, etc.) as deuterocanonical books, and they do include them in the Bible as inspired, God-given writings. They were in use in the church from before the NT times, and IIRC, it was Jerome that gave them the name "apocrypha" and the ...


12

It would make sense angels have wings if you are to accept that cherubim and seraphim are indeed angels. I don't. You are hard pressed to find anything in Scripture that indicates they are. It just isn't there. C andS beings are not messengers, comforters or have any attributes of the other angels except to say they worship and obey God. The common accounts ...


10

Some historical background regarding the Canon of Scripture The books that non-Catholics (generally Protestants) call the Apocrypha are called by Catholics the Deuterocanonical books (from the Greek δεύτερος, second; and κανῶν, literally a straight rod or bar, hence a unit of measure, or, by extension, a list). They are called the “second” canon because, ...


10

There's a few notions, but no doctrine, as the domain of doctrine in the Catholic Church is encompassed entirely by the New Testament insofar as it is the fulfillment of the entire Old Testament. But, here's a sampling off the top of my head: Tobit Archangel Rapahel in the heavenly host Respect for burying the dead as a corporal work of mercy Maccabees ...


8

In the Catholic tradition, there 3 types of historical writings dealt with here: biblical writings and/or non-biblical writings known as Apocrypha. Canononical works Deuterocanonical works Apocrypha (non-biblical works) The OP states that there are several books "used in addition to the same Old Testament canon used by Protestants", but also calls these ...


8

This question would not have even made sense to anyone prior to Copernicus, let alone to anyone who originally heard or received this image. When this story was first received, there would have been no other body for him to land on. The earth was the center of all, and the "wandering stars" aka other planets, were just lights in the sky. One of the most ...


8

Interesting question (which gets an up-vote from me), and although I am not a “King James Version Only” Protestant, I was curious enough to go looking for a possible answer. Here is part of what I found... King James (VI of Scotland and I of England) authorised his translation in 1604 and it was completed in 1611, 85 years after the first translation of ...


8

The Protestant view has been taken from the Jews. It was the Jews who did not recognise the apocryphal writings as inspired. A personal view is that the 62 weeks in Daniel 9:25 is 434 years of prophetic silence from the end of the OT (with the completion of Nehemiah) in 408 BC, to the start of the ministry of John the Baptist. This is based on a crucifixion ...


7

tl;dr> Patterson Brown, in particular, has argued the disunity within the Nag Hammadi Corpus. That's about the best you're going to get without defining a positive corpus, as opposed to the inverse of the canon. The problem with answering this question is that you are asking a question akin to "Are the books not on the NY Times Best-seller list as unified ...


6

There are two considerations. One is to establish the fact of roughly 400 years of silence based on writings of that time area. In other words, this is in fact how those of that time understood that there was silence. Two is to then establish if this is shown in Scripture and specifically the Old Testament. In other words, since we know they believed ...


6

It is true that the Jews ultimately did not accept the apocryphal books you listed in their canon, in a gradual process over several centuries at least spanning 1st century BC and 1st century AD. There was no definitive answer, but a lot of pointers showing the development, shown in the BIBLE CANON article of the 1906 Jewish Encyclopedia. Especially after ...


5

Many of the Reformation confessions (statements of belief) mention an Apocrypha, but most do not explicitly give a list of non-canonical books. Two do however, which I have quoted below. Most of those non-canonical books are in the Catholic canon, but three are not: the Prayer of Manasseh and 3rd and 4th Esdras (sometimes confusingly called 1st and 2nd ...


5

I'm not sure which specific councils you're referring to, but for the sake of this answer I'll assume it's the first four ecumenical councils. The Apocryphal writings were not the primary focus of these councils; doctrinal concerns were (the Trinitarian and Christological heresies). Here is a brief summary of these councils: Nicaea I (325 CE): Summoned ...


5

After a bit more research, I found reference to the "Testament of Hezekiah." It appears, that it a component of the larger pseudegraphical text, "Ascension of Isaiah." Perhaps why I couldn't find info at first, is that it is smack in the middle of a Jewish text. "The Testament of Hezekiah" is believed to be redacted into the text by later Christians. ...


5

While I can't speak on behalf of my EOC brothers, I may be able to offer some insight as to why the Coptic Orthodox Church considers it apocrypha, and for that matter, give some reasons as to why the EOC considers it the same. There are certain criteria for canonization that each book of the Holy Bible must follow in order to be accepted by the Church as ...


5

In the New Testament, Jesus never prescribes or approves of any particular canon Jesus doesn't anywhere speak of the canon,1 except to refer to common ways of dividing them: "the Law and the Prophets" (Matthew 5:17), "the Law, the Prophets, and the Psalms" (Luke 24:44; cf. 24:27). This latter one is significant for our purpose becaues among the Jews, the ...


4

"Condones the use of magic" Tobit is the subject of an extensive commentary by Venerable Bede, who is accepted as a Church Father by both east and west. He explains that Tobit is to be understood in an allegorical sense and not a literal/historical sense. Regarding things like smoke from a burnt entrails driving away evil spirits being "superstitious" and ...


4

William Whitaker's Disputations on Holy Scripture is a classic Reformation-era work that goes into great depth regarding the reasons that the apocrypha were rejected. He deals with Sirach (Ecclesiasticus) beginning on page 90. He begins by arguing that the "common" reasons for rejecting the apocrypha also apply to this book, such as not being part of the ...


4

Just from a cursory examination of the subject it appears that none of the bodies which gathered to consider the canon of scripture - the Catholic gathering at the Council of Trent in 1546, the Church of England's convocation resulting in the thirty-nine articles in 1563 and again resulting in the Westminster Confession of Faith in 1647, and the Orthodox ...


4

Did Jesus' disciples celebrate His birthday? A valid question to say the least, but the short answer seems to be simply: no. The Catholic Church has no such tradition from the Early Church or Church Fathers. The known Apocrypha are equally silent on this issue. The big problem with the Ancient Jews celebrating birthdays at the time of Christ is that the ...


3

Having been a Mennonite for all my adult life, and attending a Mennonite Brethren church for the last 8 years or so, I have never heard of The Shepherd of Hermas, or any of the other books you mentioned. However, Mennonites, and many other denominations, often use written resources in sermons, corporate worship (recitations, hymns, songs), etc, that are ...


3

The simple answer is that is was God’s permissive will to send the Devil to where He placed Adam and Eve in the garden. If Adam was on Mars then the Devil would have been sent there. So the answer is similar to ‘Why did God create the tree?’ ‘Why did God allow sin?’ ‘Why did God not turn the Devil into jelly-beans?’ ‘Why did God not prevent the temptation ...


3

The best answer comes Scripturally. Today, the painters of the Middle Ages have given us a picture of Jesus as a grand, handsome man. In fact, the Bible tells us the opposite - Jesus was very plain and normal looking. Let's look at some verses to support this. Emphasis added. Isaiah 53:2 (ESV) tells us the Messiah wouldn't be "beautiful" on the ...


3

This story is preserved in Menologion of the Holy Tradition, When Joseph, after returning from Egypt, began to divide his land among his children born of his first wife,1 he also wished to give a portion to the Lord Jesus Who was born supernaturally and without corruption of the all-pure Virgin Mary, and Who was then but a little child. But three of ...


3

The Douay Challoner version renders Ecclesiasticus 42:14 as: For better is the iniquity of a man, than a woman doing a good turn, and a woman bringing shame and reproach. The Catholic Haydock Commentary says regarding this verse: Better, &c. That is, there is, commonly speaking, less danger to be apprehended to the soul from the churlishness, or ...


3

St Thomas Aquinas covers this question (more-or-less) and I don't think you're going to find this in the Catechism. I think someone smarter than me will have to interpret it for you. Therefore those who are ordained to possess eternal life through divine predestination are written down in the book of life simply, because they are written therein to have ...


3

Here is the list of Catholic Deuterocanonical books. For each book, I researched the most accepted dating by scholars, consulting mostly the Dictionary of New Testament Background, IVP Press, 2000 edited by Craig A. Evans and Stanley E. Porter, Jr. (indicated by DNTB) and Wikipedia. Tobit: Story is set in 8th century BC, currently accepted dating is 225-...


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