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The angel of the Lord in Judges 2:1 speaks as Deity. Not as a representative of Deity but speaks as Deity, personally. The conclusion of what is laid out, competently, in the above question can only, logically, be that the 'messenger of the Lord' (the word is malak in Hebrew) is the same 'messenger of the Lord' referred to in, for example, Malachi 3:1, which ...


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The background is Israel rejected God as her Husband and as her King and “went about as harlots after other gods and worshipped them” (2:17). In dealing with this situation, God as the Angel of Jehovah, came in to admonish the children of Israel (vv. 1-5). So it is an admonition. First, He reminded them of Jehovah’s delivering them out from Egypt and His ...


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There are different opinions about the details of this within Christianity. Some say that the Angel of the Lord is in fact God himself, or specifically God the Son. Others say the Angel of the Lord is one who speaks for the Lord, and so when he says "I" he means the Lord. This would be considered a normal way of speaking in that day when a king ...


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