27

Of course this is more of a historical-archeological question as the Bible does not directly answer but I have stumbled across a fairly convincing argument that would place Thutmose II as the Pharaoh at the time of the Exodus. I first came across the argument in Alfred Edersheim’s Bible History. He typically pays attention to ancient monuments and secular ...


16

This issue will be debated for a long time. However, Henry H. Halley addresses this issue with great clarity. In his book, Halley's Bible Handbook, Zondervan Publishing House, Grand Rapids, Michigan, 113, "There are two leading opinions: Amenhotep II (1450-1420 B.C.), or Merneptah (1250-1220 B.C.). Merneptah was the son of Rameses II, who was a master ...


12

From a Biblical perspective, the Egyptians would have descended from Noah, but not from Abraham. Genesis 10 is considered the "Table of Nations" in the Bible as it details how the sons of Noah began to populate the earth. The tower of Babel in Genesis 11 is also a very significant event. God had commanded Noah (like He had Adam) to fill the earth. The ...


9

Here is a fascinating article about the history of the idea that the pyramids were grain stores. There is no mention of pyramids in the Bible's version of the story but in the Middle Ages people started to write them into the story. "If you go to St Mark's cathedral in Venice, there's a medieval depiction showing people using the three great pyramids of ...


8

The short answer is: No one knows. You might think it would be a simple matter of saying, "The Exodus occurred in such-and-such a year, look up who was Pharaoh in that year, problem solved." But in practice scholars debate just when the various Pharaohs ruled, and they debate even more when the Exodus happened. I've seen theories that range from Pepi II, ...


6

There may be the occasional Christian who who speculates that there is a link between the pyramids and Joseph's grain storage, but it's not part of any mainstream theology. Consider three problems: The dates don't match. The great pyramid of Egypt was built around 2560-2570 BC, and most other pyramids were earlier still, whereas the Genesis famine managed ...


3

The first problem Recall that the ancient Jews viewed the world as descended of three different bloodlines: Jaseph, Shem, and Ham. Jaseph went North, Shem largely stayed put, and Ham went South. But, before that could happen, Ham uncovered his father's nakedness and was cursed (see Gen. 9) and summarily was cursed. The story of Israel can be seen as a ...


3

No, the Nephites arrived in America around 600 B.C., long before Alexander Helios' days, with a much smaller group, on a single ship, and without their worldly treasures. The Nephites are considered Jewish, not Egyptian, except for a remnant of their written language which was reformed from the Egyptian.


2

Nobody knows for sure but modern speculations and depictions have centered on Ramses the II, Aka Ramses the Great. Here is an Egyptian news paper article on the subject. http://thecairopost.youm7.com/news/142273/culture/ramses-ii-pharaoh-of-exodus-researcher-says "In the Bible it never mentions Pharaoh's name but every other king/queen is mentioned by ...


2

Regarding Coptic doctrines on afterlife or any other topic, it is important to note that Orthodox in general (be they Chalcedonian or Miaphysite) generally place great stock in "keeping the faith of the Apostles," even more than us Latins — who have a principle of doctrinal development. Thus, if you ask a Copt about their theology in Late Antiquity, they ...


2

This question appears to assume there really was an Exodus from Egypt, as described in the Book of Exodus, although it should be noted that the strong consensus of scholars is that the Exodus did not really occur as described in the Bible. There is no mention of Moses or the Exodus in Egyptian records, but we can use the Egyptian king list to identify a ...


2

The ten plagues corresponded to ten of the major Gods of the Egyptians. The God of the Hebrews wasn't trying to convert anyone, but assert himself as the God above all other gods. 1) God of the Nile, Osiris & Hapi? Your river is blood. 2) Frog-Goddess of Fertility, Heka? You get frogs, you get frogs, everybody gets frogs. 3 & 4) Geb, the god of ...


1

I agree with Mike's answer that Thutmoses II was probably the Pharaoh of the Exodus for the reasons he stated and because it fits my possible timeline below.


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