20

The word for "scripture" in the Greek text is (ἡ) γραφή, often occurring in the plural, (τῆς) γραφῆς, which literally means "writing(s)." The word occurs approximately 50 times in the New Testament (depending on the manuscript used it is 50 or 51) and it seems pretty clear to me from a word search that this almost exclusively refers to the Old Testament ...


14

In asking this question, you have added a layer of interpretation onto the text that I do not see there. You introduce the word "want" which does not exist in the text. In fact I don't see any indication in the text that Paul has a desire for personal vengeance or that he wants Alaxander to get what's coming to him. In fact is is quite likely based on what ...


9

We can identify several views regarding the suffering of Jesus. (1) That he did feel fear and grief, but did not sin. (2) That he did not feel fear, per se, but did feel grief. Within (2), there are differing understandings of why Jesus felt grief and agony. Those who (a) accept penal substitution will argue that he was suffering on behalf of his people, ...


9

No. Even as a Calvinist, one has to understand that it takes more than one verse to put together a complete picture of how we understand salvation to work. The verse you reference in Timothy is indeed very helpful, but it really only proves the part about his purpose as the author of salvation was conceived before we were. In order to defend the doctrine of ...


8

An interesting line of thought on the assembly of the NT from a liberal scholar, David Trobisch. In short, his thesis is that Paul selected some of his own letters to be published to the churches (cf. "Did Paul Himself Create the First NT Canon"). Some in the early church — notably Marcion — viewed Paul as in conflict with the apostles in Jerusalem (esp. ...


7

A better wording would be "Did Paul want God to repay Alexander the metalworker". For all we know, Paul is merely stating a fact that God will repay ("vengeance is mine, I will repay says The Lord") Alexander - but that repayment may or may not be "bad" ... it could just as easily be that Paul is leaving it up to God, and God may choose to save him. ...


6

We do not have to make ourselves acceptable unto God. God delights in us and has given us every spiritual blessing possible because we are in Christ (Ephesians 1:3). Indeed, we are known and chosen by Him and are viewed as holy and blameless in His sight (Ephesians 1:4). You cannot get more approved than that. In Christ we have all that the Son has been ...


6

Peter supports any letter submitted by Paul under his ministry, past or future, as scripture. The reason why there is no detailed argument for it in scripture is because it was obvious as his writings were the writings of an Apostle, which was greater than a Prophet. There are some things in them that are hard to understand [i.e. Paul's writings], which ...


5

An alternative interpretation of this passage is that it refers to corporate election. Corporate election is often used as an alternative interpretation of passages dealing with election. It is the belief that God elected the Church itself to be the body of Christ and to receive salvation. For example: For the grace of God that brings salvation has ...


5

I recommend you read Jesus' parable of the talents in Matthew 25:14-30. Stewardship is a common theme throughout the Bible. A steward is an employee--in Jesus' day a servant, or even a bond-servant--who is responsible to his employer (or master) for whatever his master has entrusted to him. A talent in Jesus' day was a large sum of money. In the parable ...


5

Just like teachers today, Paul is using an illustration. The form his illustration takes is three examples of people who work hard, to show what working for God in Christian ministry is like. There are slight differences in what each example tells us about ministry. To understand it you need to read it in context: 2:1 You then, my son, be strong in the ...


3

Because Jesus descended from the family line of David. As Isaiah says, Isaiah 11 English Standard Version (ESV) The Righteous Reign of the Branch 11 There shall come forth a shoot from the stump of Jesse, and a branch from his roots shall bear fruit. The Branch is Jesus. Jesse is the father of David. In fact many prophecies from Old ...


2

Perhaps Paul is saying that "God will repay him" meaning.....let God handle it. He warns them that he strongly opposed the message so they could not be harmed. Maybe one of the disciples was saying "let me at him" and Paul is saying "God will handle it.....don't try to handle it because of what he did to me." I remember once a girl stole my money at school ...


2

The sensus plenior would simply indicate that Paul was human. Ministry leaders have feelings, too! Paul is 100% committed, and when he gets crossed, I would assume he gets cross. Throughout the New Testament, all of the writers are forever on guard against false teachers. They talk about how much damage they do in the church. As one who loves his flock, I ...


2

I believe Adam Clark is correct when in his commentary he says, "This sentence is not well translated; the original - πασα γραφη θεοκνευστος ωφιλιμος προς διδασκαλιαν, κ. τ. λ. should be rendered: Every writing Divinely inspired is profitable for doctrine, etc." Notice there is no "is" between writing and Divinely inspired (or God-breathed) in any greek ...


2

Ellicot's commentary offers a different translation than what is commonly seen, which also sheds some light on the matter: Although this rendering is grammatically possible, the more strictly accurate translation, and the one adopted by nearly all the oldest and most trustworthy versions (the Syriac and the Vulgate), and by a great many of the principal ...


2

When considering the context of the passage you quoted from Hebrews, one will notice that the the passage is given within a broad discussion spanning several chapters. The focus of the discussion is the contrast between the Levitical Priesthood and the priesthood of Christ. This verse in particular points out that the regulation by which authority is ...


2

John Chrysostom, one of the Early Church Fathers, wrote, in his Homily 10 on Second Timothy, that Paul was referring to his trial when he said Alexander had done him much harm. The next verse relates that he (Alexander) greatly withstood Paul's words, opposing his message, and the verse after that is clearly about Paul's trial , saying he had nobody to ...


1

The earliest Christians revere what we now call the Old Testament as their inspired scripture (2 Timothy 3:16-17). The apostles preached from it. The context of 2 Timothy 3:16-17 shows us that the sacred scripture is salvific as it points us to have faith in Jesus Christ. Thus, referring to the gospel, the salvific message of Christianity that leads one to ...


1

In the quoted passage, the Apostle Paul is not writing about paying back Alexander, but that he trusted that justice will be administered by the Lord. Paul was consistent with Jesus' command to exercise charity, which is defined by current Catholic teaching as: CCC 1822 Charity is the theological virtue by which we love God above all things for his own ...


1

Is there a logical flow in 2 Timothy 2:4-7? Sometimes Paul can write what sounds like a staccato of bullet points that seem a little disconnected. In context Paul sounds like he is writing in view of only a little time left to him. In a way that many who face the end of their life do, he tries to summarize things for Timothy. In so doing he hits points ...


1

I have always understood it as being connected with the Mystical Body of Christ. If we endure, stay firmly connected to the Mystical Body, then just as Christ is the King of the Universe, we are also part of that kingship by our connection to Him.


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