Hot answers tagged

10

There are two common ways to explain this: The "third year" refers to the third year of Elijah's stay in Zarephath, following a stay of some months at the brook Cherith (Adam Clarke, Barnes, Haydock, Keil and Delitzsch) The "third year" refers to the time of Elijah's exile, which did not begin until the dry period had already been underway for six months (...


10

70 years David was thirty years old when he became king, and he reigned forty years. 2 Samuel 5:4


9

The following books are referenced in the King James Version of the bible but are not found in that text.(source) book of the Wars of the Lord (Num. 21:14); book of Jasher (Josh. 10:13; 2 Sam. 1:18); book of the acts of Solomon (1 Kgs. 11:41); book of Samuel the seer (1 Chr. 29:29); book of Gad the seer (1 Chr. 29:29); book of Nathan ...


8

This looks like a reference to the manslaughter provision in Exodus: Exodus 21:12-14 12 He that smiteth a man, so that he die, shall be surely put to death. 13 And if a man lie not in wait, but God deliver him into his hand; then I will appoint thee a place whither he shall flee. 14 But if a man come presumptuously upon his neighbour, to ...


7

You need to read the rest of the passage. Verse 14 reads: For thus says the Lord, the God of Israel, ‘The jar of flour shall not be spent, and the jug of oil shall not be empty, until the day that the Lord sends rain upon the earth.’” Thus we can assume that once the rain came, and there was no longer a need for the flour and oil to be provided directly ...


6

For what it's worth, I once heard a sermon in which the preacher said it was not the same fellow. My bible has the following intro to Obadiah: Obadiah wrote this shortest book of the Old Testament probably soon after 586 B.C. when the armies of Babylon destroyed Jerusalem. During this conquest, the people of Edom helped capture fleeing Israelites ...


5

Many people do not realize that believers and non-believers alike receive a default protection from God. They have a "hedge" around them similar to the hedge described as around Job. If it were not so, Satan and his evil spirits would do be able to do as they please. "Have you not put a hedge around him and his household and everything he has?" (Job 1:10) ...


4

As far as we can tell, the old prophet wanted some company for a meal. When he hears the man of God reply that the Lord had told him not to have such a meal, he does not believe and is dismissive, as if saying "sure, sure, I'm a prophet too, and I was told to ask you just now". This was a lie: God did not cause the old prophet to choose to lie in this way, ...


4

Compare a number of English versions here. Nearly all have the form 700 and 300. The Bible in Basic English (BBE) specifically reads, He had seven hundred wives, daughters of kings, and three hundred other wives; and through his wives his heart was turned away. There is no real reason to think the numbers don't add together to make 1000 total, and in ...


3

This is one place where the NIV translation falls short. The quoted passage says “[David did not fail] to keep any of the LORD’s commands.” However the Hebrew word used here is soor, which means to turn aside. Note that the NIV cross-references Deut. 5:32 and 1Ki 9:4, which both talk about turning away from God’s commands. This is one passage where other ...


3

David chose Solomon as his successor because “the word of the Lord came to [him]” telling him to do so. David, due to his many sins, was unworthy of building God’s temple. God chose Solomon from before his birth as the one who would build the temple and reign over Israel. 1 Chronicles 22:6-10 6 Then he called for Solomon his son and charged him to build ...


3

Because the LDS don't believe the Book of Mormon contradicts itself ("the Book of Mormon was the most correct of any book on earth", Joseph Smith), it must be referring to other materials which weren't mentioned in 2 Nephi 5:15. Here are some examples of materials which were used in the temple of Solomon that Nephi could have been referring to, which were ...


3

I found an article that explains the meaning of the name Belial and the use of the expression "sons of Belial" in the Old Testament. Belial is a compound word, believed to have been taken from the Hebrew beliy, meaning “not,” and ya'al, meaning “profit” or “benefit.” It is used twenty-six times in the Old Testament, usually translated as “worthless” in ...


3

David did not take it for granted that one of his sons would become king after him. This is because he knew that God chose him (and not any of Saul's sons) to become king of Israel after Saul. It was the prophet Nathan who conveyed that David's descendant would be king after him. Quoting 2 Samuel 7:12, from the prophecy of Nathan, "When your days are ...


3

I agree with gwofatlanta's conclusion and would put it in even stronger terms - it is highly unlikely that the servant in 1 Kings 18 refers to Obadiah. Firstly, "your servant" was a common polite form of address in biblical times, and it is extremely common for it to be used in this non-literal sense. Secondly Obadiah is specifically described as a palace ...


2

In the context of Hebrews, the writer made references to the Tabernacle only, not the Temple. In the wilderness wanderings, at the time of the Tabernacle, the contents in the Ark of the Covenant were the stone tablets, the pot of manna, and Aaron's rod. If the manna and the rod were not transported in the Ark, scripture would have specified how they were ...


2

If God cannot tempt anyone, what is the meaning of the following scriptures? James 1:13 Let no man say when he is tempted, I am tempted of God: for God cannot be tempted with evil, neither tempteth he any man: 1 Kings 22:20-22 And the LORD said, Who shall persuade Ahab, that he may go up and fall at Ramothgilead? And one said on this manner, ...


2

There is a key difference between the story of Abraham's "sacrifice of Isaac" in Genesis 22:1-19 and the story of the man of God from Judah in 1 Kings 13. Abraham heard directly from the angel of the Lord that he was not to sacrifice his son Isaac after all (see Genesis 22:11-12). The man of God in 1 Kings 13 did not hear any countervailing word directly ...


2

Throughout his reign, David was surrounded by enemies, schemers and plotters, including his own sons. The first three sons died. Adonijah was to succeed David, until his plot to overthow his father was uncovered. Taken from 2 Samuel 3:2-5 are the names of the sons born to David in Hebron: Amnon the son of Ahinoam of Jezreel (David’s wife) – raped his ...


1

Probably not. This unnamed servant was left in Beersheba by Elijah ( I Kings 19:3). After naming Obadiah specifically and detailing his conversation with Elijah in the first half of I Kings 18, it would be unreasonable not to name him in the interactions with Elijah later on, if had been Obadiah again.


1

Though what you are saying may be true, it doesn't necessarily have to be so. A son of Belial doesn't need to be a direct Satan worshiper, but simply stray from God's commands, from God's Word. The Jewish Leaders had all the truth, but did not live according to it. In talking to them Jesus said: Ye are of your father the devil, and the lusts of your ...


1

There are two "Sheba"s in the Bible. One is a descendant of Cush (Ethiopia). This Cush is probably somewhere near there. The other is a decendant of Shem. The Semite Sheba's brothers include Ophir and Havilah. Ophir and Havila are places accessible from King Solomon's Red Sea port Etzion Geber (near Eilat/Aqaba today) It would make sense that the Semite ...


1

Oooor it could have just been the fact that this old prophet plainly lied about seeing an angel just to manipulate the man of God from Judah to disobey God and eat with him. Hospitality was a big thing in Middle Eastern times back then. But, most importantly, it seems this was a test for the young prophet, not the old prophet, as the former was the focal ...


1

Calmet recognized this. As it says in the Catholic Haydock Commentary for Luke 9:62: Christ seems here to allude to the call of Eliseus by Elias. The former was at the plough, and the latter called him. Immediately Eliseus quits his plough, runs with Elias's permission to bid adieu to his father and mother, sacrifices two of his oxen, roasts them with the ...


1

While Yahwistic temples and worship sites outside Jerusalem may appear to violate the Deuturonomic prohibition, this is only so because we often think of the history of ancient Israel and Judah backwards. The broad consensus of scholars is that the Book of Deuteronomy – though set by its authors in an earlier era – was actually written several centuries ...


1

Many places in the Old Testament show the people of Israel either being directed by God, or of their own accord, building altars to Him that were not either in the tabernacle, or (much later) the temple. A sampling of passages: Deuteronomy 27:4ff, "So when you have crossed over the Jordan, you shall set up these stones, about which I am commanding you ...


1

The final "tempted" in James 1:13 means "test." (http://www.blueletterbible.org/lang/lexicon/lexicon.cfm?Strongs=G3985&t=ESV) It does not mean to lure someone to sin, which is the popular meaning of the word. None of the examples given are God luring people to sin against him.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible