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The authenticity of the Johannine comma, found in 1 John 5:7, has been a subject of debate from the early sixteenth century. Wikipedia says the general consensus today is that the passage is a Latin corruption that entered the Greek manuscript tradition in subsequent copies. By the way, the Johannine Comma is not to be confused with the modern punctuation ...


10

Protestants actually provide a variety of interpretations of this passage. The "easy" answer, that this refers to the "unforgivable sin," is held by some, but others argue that the case for that interpretation is weak, and suggest several alternatives. A couple of notes to begin: Protestant definitions of the unforgivable sin vary significantly, and ...


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The Bible gives several ways. One of the easiest is if their predictions don't come true: When a prophet speaketh in the name of the LORD, if the thing follow not, nor come to pass, that is the thing which the LORD hath not spoken, but the prophet hath spoken it presumptuously: thou shalt not be afraid of him (Deuteronomy 18:22). Another is if ...


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Preface: 1 John 2:2 in Swedenborg's writings Emanuel Swedenborg (1688–1772) does not comment directly on 1 John 2:2 anywhere in his published or unpublished theological writings. He does quote 1 John 2:2 in one of his unpublished notebooks, traditionally titled Scripture Confirmations, which served as a specialized Bible concordance for the composition of ...


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Calvinists see the "whole world" in this passage as referring to the elect throughout the world, particularly emphasizing that Christ died for Gentiles as well as Jews. Examples Examples of this approach abound. John Gill: that is, not for the Jews only, for John was a Jew, and so were those he wrote unto, but for the Gentiles also (source) ...


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David, I admire your research into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, LDS, or the Mormons. :) In the Book of Mormon we read; Moroni 10:32 - Yea, come unto Christ, and be perfected in him, and deny yourselves of all ungodliness; and if ye shall deny yourselves of all ungodliness , and love God with all your might, mind and strength, then is his ...


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The Greek word used in both verses is ‘kosmos’ but, according to the context in which it is used, it has different meanings. The following explanation is from a Protestant perspective. Kosmos, or world, can mean the physical world, this planet; the present order of things; the secular world; the human race external to the Jewish nation; the heathen world;...


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I have never heard this questions asked of Mormons before. There are doctrinal differences regarding the nature of the Trinity, etc. but this is very basic doctrine for us unless I am not fully understanding the intent of the question. First of all, we accept this truth as found in the Bible. In the Book of Mormon, a prophet named Nephi, has a vision in ...


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The most important thing when interpreting a passage is the context: John 8:21-23 ESV So he [Jesus] said to them [Pharisees] again, “I am going away, and you will seek me, and you will die in your sin. Where I am going, you cannot come." So the Jews said, “Will he kill himself, since he says, ‘Where I am going, you cannot come’?” He said to them, “You ...


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Regarding the "last hour" language, dispensationalist Thomas Constable writes that it is the entire time between the ascension and the return of Christ: In the drama of human history, all of John's readers, including ourselves, play our part in the last act. Throughout the New Testament, the writers regarded the present inter-advent age, after the ...


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I recommend you read Zane Hodges' book "The Gospel Under Siege" for a full answer to this question, as he deals with 1 John. I am fully convinced that 1 John is a letter to believers and is a test of fellowship, not a test of life. When it says in the original greek that they are "not of God" it is referring to their fellowship with God, not whether they are ...


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What is “sin that leads to death” in 1 John 5:16? Earlier in John's letter he states that those who have no love for their fellow Christians "abide in death". 1 John 3:14 We know that we have passed from death unto life, because we love the brethren. He that loveth not his brother abideth in death. Even just a few verses earlier (5:12) John says that ...


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In verses 1–3, John speaks first of the "spirit of God VS the "spirit of antichrist". In verses 4–6 he speaks of the "spirit of truth" VS the "spirit of falsehood" ("error" in KJV). These are the same two spirits; the restating of same concept in different terms is common in OT and NT. So the spirit of God is the spirit of truth, and the spirit of ...


2

From the introduction to Tullian's book: The unintended consequence of this push [for a more radical expression of Christianity], however, is that if we're not careful, we can give people the impression that Christianity is first and foremost about the sacrifice we make for Jesus rather than the sacrifice Jesus made for us; our performance for him rather ...


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Metaphors are Rooted in Context In comparing these two passages, consider the context. In John 8:23, Jesus is comparing people to himself. By this comparison, we are all “from beneath.” Jesus was human, but he wasn’t only human. We are only human. In 1 John 4:5-6, John is comparing believers to false prophets and antichrists. The believers are from God (...


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Why does 1 John say Christians are unable to sin? 1 John 3:6 Whosoever abideth in him sinneth not: whosoever sinneth hath not seen him, neither known him. 1 John 3:9 Whosoever is born of God doth not commit sin; for his seed remaineth in him: and he cannot sin, because he is born of God. One of the problems in translating something between ...


2

"Protestantism" is rather broad, but generally "his commandments" would be all of God's commandments for Man that weren't given as part of a specific covenent. For instance, prohibitions against drinking wine or cutting hair were binding only on Nazarites. Similarly, circumcision was commanded of the Israelites as part of the Old Covenant, as a physical ...


2

The traditional Calvinistic understanding of the relationship between God's knowledge and God's decree relies on an important distinction, which I'll briefly explain, then present to you how Historically Reformed Confessions articulate the relationship. When we are talking about "time" before creation, we must understand that "time" in any traditional ...


1

The saying “my yoke is easy and my burden is light” is part of a larger passage (Matthew 11:28–30), in which Jesus tells all who are weary and burdened to come to Him for rest. He isn’t speaking here of physical burdens. Rather, it was the heavy burden of the system of works that the Pharisees laid on the backs of the people that Jesus was offering to ...


1

The "world" that John 3:16 is speaking of is the people, not the behavior. Look at the whole context. [John 3:14-21 NKJV] 14 "And as Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, even so must the Son of Man be lifted up, 15 "that whoever believes in Him should not perish but have eternal life. 16 "For God so loved the world that He gave His only ...


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I think that if one attempts to interpret this passage in the context of a taxonomy of sin, wherein some sins are "sins unto death" (e.g. "mortal" sins) and others are not (e.g. "venial" sins), then one will not arrive at a completely sensible meaning. Another interpretation is that sin is "unto death" occurs when one has neither the slightest bit of ...


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Bible Gateway has an electronic copy of the Mounce Concise Greek-English Dictionary of the New Testament. Here, you can find the meaning of Greek words used in various contexts of the Bible. The word, "spirit", used here is πνεῦμα (pneuma). Throughout the Bible, this word may refer to the Holy Spirit, a spiritual being, a foul spirit, spirit as a vital ...


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Of the Apostles, John was possibly the most concerned with the Spiritual aspects of the Kingdom of God. Most of Johns writings (John, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd John) are all primarily dedicated to exposing the Deity of Jesus and that The Kingdom of God is totally Spiritual. And with this in mind let us analyze Some Scripture starting with the Scriptures you quote. ...


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John 8:23 states: But he continued, "You are from below; I am from above. You are of this world; I am not of this world. Oh wait, what's right before that: This made the Jews ask, "Will he kill himself? Is that why he says, 'Where I go, you cannot come'?" So let's grammatically simplify that: "The Jews are from below..." Even ...


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There are different approaches through which Protestant theologians interpret this passage. The distinction of sin is of intensity. Venial and Mortal sins. The distinction of forgivable and unforgivable sins. Only blasphemy of Holy Spirit leads to death. Or apostasy alone leads to death. The distinction is of frequency of sinning. No distinction of sin, ...


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