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That the Son (in regard to his Deity) should have a relationship with his Father, which is a matter of filial and voluntary subjection, does not mean that he is not equal in Deity to the Father. Equal in Divine nature, or 'form', as we see in Philippians : who, being in the form of God, thought it not robbery to be equal to God, [Philippians 2:6 YLT] Yet ...


4

What is the difference between God and the Spirit of God? What is the difference between Christ and the Spirit of Christ? What is the difference between the Father and the Son? We could go on and on. If we understood this perfectly, we would be God and that is untrue so we can never understand this question finally. The church fathers simply asserted (in ...


4

When we read of the Spirit doing this or that, we should include all references to this 'feature' of God - is it a person, a force, a power, an influence or what? We should begin with the bible and then use that revelation to compare other ideas against - not the other way around. (having an idea or tradition and looking for biblical support for it) 10 ...


4

Pascal's wager looked at the consequences of belief in God versus unbelief against the possibilities of God versus no God. In 1 Cor. 15 Paul dealt with Greek philosophy that looked at death as releasing the spirit from the body and looked that the idea of a bodily resurrection as foolishness. Paul was not looking at God versus no God. He was looking at the ...


4

The prophets (inspired preachers) spoke to groups, for general attitudes and ideas, making them accountable to the gospel through Spirit inspired authority and conviction. In most old commentaries and theology there are two aspects of prophecy 'predicting the future' or 'declaring the mind of God' generally. Both when referring to them as a gift, to be a ...


3

What does 1 Corinthians 15:17-19 state? The apostle Paul wrote: "And if Christ be not raised, your faith is vain; ye are yet in your sins. Then they also which are fallen asleep in Christ are perished. If in this life only we have hope in Christ, we are of all men most miserable." What does 'Pascal's Wager' state? What later became known as '...


3

1 Corinthians 14:1 reads : διωκετε την αγαπην ζηλουτε δε τα πνευματικα μαλλον δε ινα προφητευητε [TR undisputed] The word 'gifts' is not there in the Greek text and the KJV faithfully puts italics for the missing word which is a conjecture. Follow after charity, and desire spiritual gifts, but rather that ye may prophesy. [1 Corinthians 14:1 KJV] ... be ...


3

Remember that St. Paul said this in the context of listing eyewitnesses to Jesus's resurrection in which he was the last one to whom Jesus appeared, in contrast with the other apostles. St. Thomas Aquinas provided a natural reading of 3 ways of St. Paul's comparing himself to the other apostles as 3 aspects of a fetus untimely born: outside the proper time (...


2

26 Then God said, “Let Us make man in Our image, according to Our likeness. They will rule the fish of the sea, the birds of the sky, the livestock, all the earth, and the creatures that crawl[i] on the earth.” 27 So God created man in His own image; He created him in the image of God; He created them male and female. (Genesis 1:26-27) The confusion is in ...


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I am aware of several instances where something similar to this has happened--most of them private, a few of them public. A comment I shared on the related post on the hermeneutics site may be worth sharing here as well--Jesus did on occasion call people to repentance more publicly (e.g. Matthew 23), but this appears to have been at least in part to protect ...


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This is going to be a partial answer, but probably as good as you are going to get. There are certainly congregations that practice prophecy in their open worship services. Many Pentecostals do. There is at least the possibility that a member of the congregation will prophecy aloud something that "discloses the secrets of the heart" of an outsider ...


2

What is the difference between God and the spirit of God? We'll see that the 'spirit of God' is the same as the 'Holy Spirit'. The terms are interchangeable. God is the creator. The HS is not, but is prominent in God's creation process. we see from John that the logos is also prominent in creation, but God is still the creator. God alone is immortal, He is ...


2

The answer seems indeed to be John Chrysostom (meaning Golden Mouth), the famous fourth century church father, theologian, liturgist, and preacher, who wrote commentaries on almost every single book in the New Covenant, the main reason for this residing in the fact that none of the previous systematical exegetical works contain a commentary on the two ...


2

Interpreting 1 Cor 15 We have to read 1 Cor 15:17-19 in its larger context, at least at the paragraph level: 1 Cor 15:12-19. Then it becomes obvious that for verse 19, the "we" in "we are of all people" refers to Paul and the apostles, NOT the Corinthian church. Chapter 15 is about Paul's response to several Corinthians who believed that ...


2

There is a flaw in Pascal's Wager which 1 Corinthians 15 highlights. On its own terms, Pascal's Wager makes a reasonable argument for why people should be theists, but like many other apologetic arguments it does not lead people to specifically Christian faith. Pascal's Wager treats faith like a mathematical problem, inviting us to be actuarial scientists, ...


1

Both of the negative consequents are immaterial because the precedent is untrue. This is simple logic. Both statements reduce to this: If this thing that is true were not true, then (insert some arbitrary prognostication here). The fact is that the latter statement can never be evaluated, and will never be evaluated, because the purported condition that ...


1

Paul and Pascal are addressing different audiences. Paul is writing to believers to whom he has preached about the resurrection. Pascal is primarily writing to those who were trying to decide between atheism and Christianity. Pascal is making a broader argument about risk and reward with regards to eternity. If God exists, believing that he doesn’t entails ...


1

The question reminds of how I once heard a skeptical cessationist leaning theology professor described how he tested some so-called self styled interpreters of tongues. The story goes that the professor took charge by requesting that three of the interpreters present listen to a person who was engaged in the speaking of tongues. Then he requested that those ...


1

Speaking the same thing The full text of 1 Cor. 1:10 (KJV) reads: Now I beseech you, brethren, by the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, that ye all speak the same thing, and that there be no divisions among you; but that ye be perfectly joined together in the same mind and in the same judgment. [emphasis mine] From the context, Paul was not saying that the ...


1

It is not clear what percentage of full-preterists view the 'perfect' St. Paul is referring to here as events around AD 70. It is difficult to find significant full-preterist commentary on this particular passage. My natural reading of 1 Corinthians 13:8-12, and my best guess, is that St. Paul is referring to Heaven. In Heaven, it seems natural to say we see ...


1

What are the basis and larger connotations of the term “untimely born“ as St. Paul refers to himself in 1 Corinthians? The Douay-Rheims 1899 Catholic edition of 1 Corinthians 15:7-9 goes as follows: 7 After that, he was seen by James, then by all the apostles. 8 And last of all, he was seen also by me, as by one born out of due time. 9 For I am the least of ...


1

According to Thayer's Greek Lexicon, the word God has a wide range of meanings: STRONGS NT 2316: Θεός ... a general appellation of deities or divinities ... Whether Christ is called God ... spoken of the only and true God ... Θεός is used of whatever can in any respect be likened to God, or resembles him in any way: Hebraistically, equivalent to God's ...


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Contemporary English version 1 Corinthians 15:24 "Then after Christ has destroyed all powers and forces, the end will come, and he will give the kingdom to God the Father.." It's referring to the final outcome ie the end. Verse 25 "Christ will rule until he puts all his enemies under his power," Please note, it says 'until' he has ...


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These verses need to be understood in the greater context of the New Testament. In isolation, they could be misconstrued as denigrating marriage, which they certainly do not. Best modern exegesis on 1 Cor. 7:32-33: Ernest Bernard Allo, O.P. (1873-1945), Saint Paul: Première épître aux Corinthiens (1934), pp. 181-83. "is divided" The Greek verb ...


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I don't disagree with the two answers above, but we need to remember that most of the New Testament had not yet been written when Paul wrote this, including most of his own letters. However, his own example in the letter provides the context we need; he frequently quotes passages from the Old Testament and adds to this commands "from the Lord" (...


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